Humyara Mahbub: Intricate Golden Dome

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© Humyara Mahbub 2020


Humyara Mahbub is an illustrator in Sydney. She has been drawing comics for more than ten years. She’s in therapy, so don’t worry about it.

You can visit Humyara’s website here and Instagram here.


4A Digital is a platform for creative and academic exploration, giving artists, writers, academics and professionals the opportunity to experiment and investigate concepts and ideas outside of the exhibition and published journal formats. This is the first volume in an ongoing monthly series of webcomics by Australian authors and artists.

은미 | Eunmi

Hyun Lee

These photos are of Eunmi Pang, a Korean shaman based in Goyang which is a city just outside of Seoul. I shot these photos during a research trip last year. 

I first found out about Eunmi when I was researching Korean shamanism for a project. She was one of two English-speaking shamans that came up on Google. She stood out to me because she used to be a fashion model before she was a shaman. I emailed her and got a response right away. Although her English was great, there was a digital communication barrier that my terrible Korean couldn’t overcome. The back and forth of emails fizzled out quickly and I completely forgot about her soon after. I guess that’s the magic of the internet: it can throw something into arms reach and then straight back into the void.

Korean shamanism involves ghosts, spirits, fate and magic. There are 30,000 practicing shamans in Korea today. It’s been around since forever and is still a huge part of Korean society and culture, it’s not a dead historical thing. It’s hard to believe shamanism can exist in a modern country known for its K-pop and plastic surgery but I think that’s because Koreans actively hide it from the outside world. There’s a weird stigma around shamans and people are generally quite secretive about their relationships with them. I once asked my mum if she’d ever met one and she denied it with a suspicious defensiveness only to admit later that she’d visited one when she was younger “but it was only one time!”. It’s kept well hidden but it’s one of those things: if you know what you’re looking for, it’s easy to find. Or in my experience some kind of magic leads you straight to it.

After that failed email exchange with Eunmi I realised I needed to physically go to Korea to get any real research done. I committed myself to learning Korean properly and after a year I went to Seoul. I had no idea what I was going to do, my Korean was still pretty bad at that point (and still is now). Thinking about how I would manage anything with such poor language skills made me nervous so I procrastinated from preparing for the trip entirely. When I arrived I only had a vague plan to stay in a temple on a mountain because it seemed like an appropriate place to get rid of my anxiety.

Korea has a government-funded ‘temple stay’ program where a big bunch of temples are open to the public. You can stay at a temple for a few days, hang out in nature and do various Buddhist things. Most temples were closed or filled up by the time I was sitting in my Airbnb trying to book one on my laptop. With the power of internet magic I eventually found one that wasn’t too far away and two days later I was there. The temple was huge and empty. It probably housed many more monks in the past than it does now. Buddhism used to be the big thing in Korea but Christianity has taken over. There are churches absolutely everywhere in Seoul. There are also heaps of Buddhist temples but they’re hidden in the mountains and far fewer people go to them these days. Religions come and go but shamanism has always been there in the background.

When I arrived at the temple there was only one other person doing temple stay. She was a Korean-American woman and her Korean just as bad as mine. Talking to her filled me with more dread and anxiety because we were speaking in English and I felt like I should’ve been practicing Korean, let alone “researching”. I put my phone on airplane mode and spent the first day wandering aimlessly on the mountain by myself. On the second day I had lunch with the American lady. The temple dining hall had chairs and tables for a hundred people but we were the only ones there. It was eerily dark, quiet and empty.

I don’t remember how it came up in conversation but we started talking about Korean shamanism. I told her about my project and she said “Oh you should meet this shaman I know, she’s very interesting, she used to be a fashion model”. Naturally, the first person I met in Korea knew a shaman and would openly talk about this taboo topic with me. All of a sudden I remembered I’d emailed a shaman a year prior, ex-fashion model Eunmi, and that was exactly who the American lady was talking about. After lunch I turned airplane mode off, emailed Eunmi again and met with her two days later. It was like the magic of the internet, everything you need is right there if you just search for it.

It seemed so simple and obvious at the time but thinking about it now, it was actually an incredibly lucky chain of coincidences. Of all the places I could’ve been, of all the people I could’ve met, of the 30,000 shamans I could’ve encountered, I was led straight back to Eunmi. I later found out that the Korean-American woman had travelled to Korea to become a shaman herself under Eunmi’s teaching. It was as if I’d met her not by chance but by some force of fate. I was always at the right place at the right time and Eunmi later told me it wasn’t a coincidence. She said I had a sort of guardian angel: it was the spirit of my great grandmother who was a shaman herself and she was helping me with my research.

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All images © Hyun Lee 2019.


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Hyun Lee is a writer, director and photographer based in Sydney.


4A Digital is a platform for creative and academic exploration, giving artists, writers, academics and professionals the opportunity to experiment and investigate concepts and ideas outside of the exhibition and published journal formats.

Exhibition Opening: Eugenia Lim: The Ambassador, Bega Valley Regional Gallery

BEGA VALLEY REGIONAL GALLERY

8 MAY 2020

Note: Eugenia Lim: The Ambassador will be opening in a modified, digital capacity.

Eugenia Lim is an Australian artist of Chinese–Singaporean descent who works across video, performance and installation. In her work, Lim transforms herself into invented fictional personas who traverse through time and cultures to explore how national identities and stereotypes cut, divide and bond our globalised world.

This 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Museums & Galleries of NSW (M&G NSW) initiated touring project presents Lim’s most recent body of work, The Ambassador seriesIn this three-part project, Lim takes on a Mao-like persona who sits halfway between truth and fantasy –  dressed in a gold lamé suit and matching bowl haircut. Throughout each of her works, the Ambassador takes on new roles in uncovering the Australian-Asian narrative – drilling down into racial politics, the social costs of manufacturing and the role of architecture in shaping society.


Eugenia Lim’s (b. 1981 Melbourne, Australia) work has been exhibited internationally at venues including the Tate Modern, GOMA, ACMI, HUN Gallery NY, and FACT Liverpool. She has received a number of Australia Council for the Arts grants and residencies, including a residency at the Experimental Television Centre NY and exchange at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). Recent residencies include Bundanon Trust, 4A Beijing Studio and the Robin Boyd Foundation. Collaboration, artistic community and the intersection between art and society informs her practice: in addition to her solo work, she co-directed the inaugural Channels: the Australian Video Art Festival, is a board member at Next Wave, the founding editor of Assemble Papers and co-founder of interdisciplinary collective Tape Projects.

 

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Poetics of Light

Dr. Dacchi Dang

 

Since 2008, my artistic practice has been an exploration and investigation of cultural identity, experience and memories through a practical experimentation utilising the pinhole camera. My personal experience as a post-war Australian Chinese-Vietnamese refugee generates difference, with the question of otherness, diaspora, dislocation, displacement and liminality continually circulating around the tension of belonging, yearning and memory. This sense of difference informs how I use the pinhole camera and inspires multiple perspectives associated with the geographic, political and social landscapes of Australia and Vietnam.

The pinhole has played a prominent role in the history of Western culture. Artists, philosophers and scientists including Brunelleschi, da Vinci, Dürer, Raphael, Kepler, Newton, and Déscartes employed the pinhole as the starting point for some of their theories: crucially, the theory of fixed-eye point or single-point perspective described as a structured reality that holds our entire visual world together[1]. While many Western artists since the Renaissance have represented the world with a central or single-point perspective and focus on salient objects in a scene, their Eastern counterparts have concentrated on context information with multiple perspectives reading from Heaven to Earth in their paintings.

Increasingly, pioneering artists – da Vinci, Monet, Cezanne and Picasso – sought to challenge single-point perspective in 2D works, particularly from the mid-nineteenth century onwards. Contemporary artists have attempted to abandon the theory of single point perspective offered by the camera lens, “to reinvestigate the altering, destruction, or natural evolvement of one-point perspective, thereby creating another visual structure,”[2] as articulated by David Hockney in his endeavour to redefine space.

As pinhole photography is more about the experimentation involved in the process it permits certain freedoms in comparison with other image-making photographic approaches. Because its process embodies chance, pinhole photography is similar to the way many of us live our lives. As a result, this method of experimental photography presents the most interesting and creative modifications for low-cost film cameras, manual printing techniques and unconventional use of the medium. Photographers who successfully operate and create resolved images virtually master a knowledge of optics: the understanding of the interplay of light is a fundamental element for photographers in their visual creativity. Apart from placing the pinhole camera in a certain space or location and dictating the nature of the hole filtering the light, the user has little control over how light and emulsion interact with each other. Even if the camera is placed in the exact same position, at the exact time of day and using the exact same material, each resultant single image will be different. This difference runs the full spectrum, from subtle to substantial, to a point where what has been captured does not seem to bear any meaningful resemblance to other images.

A great deal of understanding about other cultures derives from our comprehension of visual language and capacity to recognise and interpret our relationship to space and time. The extent to which aspects of our inhabited space can be apprehended also depends on time: like an f-stop in the camera aperture, the wider your vision is open to the outside world the more you are able to take in. Like the flattened depth of field of the pinhole camera, there may be some confusion or incomprehension between new and old. By taking these observations in slowly and by not opening completely, you are better able to analyse the information in order not only to more clearly ascertain the difference between the old and new, but also to keep your vision open in the search for new information as you explore these temporal spaces. While other types of cameras are both equally important and valuable to my practice and conceptual concerns, the use of the ‘dot’ or pinprick of light in my pinhole camera is more capable of revealing these complex realities of the liminal space that Vietnamese refugees face in relation to their negotiation of diaspora identity and of home. My dot is not only a mark, it is also reference a point: a point in time, a point of departure or arrival, a point of dislocation and relocation, and a point of view or a fixed point of single perspective.

 

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Dacchi Dang, Fish of the Day from Full Circle series, 2009.                                                             Dacchi Dang, Morning Light on Biota Street from Full Circle series, 2009

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Dacchi Dang, Old Rock, 2009.                                                                                                                  Dacchi Dang, Landscape, 2009

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Dacchi Dang, Woman Hut, 2009 
Feature image: Dacchi Dang, Faith from the Full Circle series, 2009

[1] Eric Renner,1995, Pinhole Photography, ibid., p. ix
[2] Eric Renner, 1995, ibid., pp.157-158 dacchi-dang


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Dr. Dacchi Dang
is a Sydney-based photographic artist and independent researcher, specialising in alternative photographic processes.


4A Digital is a platform for creative and academic exploration, giving artists, writers, academics and professionals the opportunity to experiment and investigate concepts and ideas outside of the exhibition and published journal formats.

ANNOUNCEMENT: TEMPORARY GALLERY CLOSURE AND PROGRAM ADJUSTMENT

AN IMPORTANT UPDATE FROM
4A CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART:

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art will close our office and galleries from Wednesday 18 March to ensure the health and well-being of our staff, creatives, audience and wider community.

From Wednesday 18 March, 4A will also suspend all planned public programming and performances (at 4A galleries and with partners at the Chinese Garden of Friendship and through our touring program Eugenia Lim: The Ambassador) with a look to reschedule these programs upon reopening and deliver additional digital content where possible.

4A and International Curators Forum have decided to postpone the exhibition I am a heart beating in the world: Diaspora Pavilion 2, Sydney. With a desire to realise the exhibition at a time when our creative team can work together in Sydney and audiences can engage with the artworks and our planned public programs, the Diaspora Pavilion 2, Sydney project is at this time postponed from April 2020 until November 2020. The exhibitionThings That Fall Apart will be rescheduled to our 2021 program. The 4A Curators Intensive is now planned for November 2020 in line with the Diaspora Pavilion 2, Sydney exhibition.

4A staff will be working from home in this period and we are working to make sure that our program will return to our gallery and partner spaces better than ever, and that you can stay engaged with and support the important work of our creative community in this time of isolation.

While 4A will close our physical gallery space in this period, we are looking forward to engaging with you digitally – on our Instagram, Facebook, Mixcloud, YouTube – and through our website, archive and the 4A Papers. Stay tuned for updates about our public programming, events and exhibitions through these platforms, and stay in touch with our team through email and phone – details here:
http://www.4a.com.au/about-4a/people/ 

We look forward to staying in touch,

The 4A team

4A Curators’ Intensive Participants Announced

POSTPONED

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art will close our office and galleries from Wednesday 18 March to ensure the health and wellbeing of our staff, creatives, audience and wider community. The 4A Curators Intensive is now planned for November 2020 in line with the Diaspora Pavilion 2, Sydney exhibition’s postponement.


Anna Louise Richardson, Danielle Fusco, Emily Wakeling, Farzana Khan, Olivia Welch, Perri Sparnon, Priya Pavri, Sebastian Henry-Jones, Tian Zhang and Wilson Yeung have been selected as the participants of the 2020 4A Curators’ Intensive.

This is the fifth iteration of the Intensive program that has been offered biennially since 2012 with support from Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund. In 2020, the program aligns with the first iteration of 4A and International Curators Forum (ICF)’s exhibition, I am a beating heart in the world: Diaspora Pavilion 2, Sydney. With a focus on diaspora, the 2020 program will expand, complicate and even destablise the term itself engaging with the complexities, challenges and continued relevance that the diasporic experience and diasporic art have today.

 

About the curators:

Anna Louise Richardson

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Anna Louise Richardson is an independent, interdisciplinary curator and artist particularly interested in art practices concerned with place making, the archive and identity politics.

Living and working on a cattle farm in Western Australia, her drawing practice investigates rural identity and mythology through relationships with the natural world complicated by human intervention, intergenerational expectations and the role of animals in culture, commerce and ecology.

Graduating with a BFA from Curtin University in 2013, she is currently curator of The Alternative Archive, a survey of regional practice in Western Australia at John Curtin Gallery co-curated with Director Chris Malcolm; Refractive Realities: 2020 PICA Salon; and the John Stringer Prize 2020.

Richardson has curated independent projects at Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, Fremantle Arts Centre, Galerie Pompom, Moana Project Space, Chapter House Lane for Human Rights Arts & Film Festival, co-curated exhibitions at Arts Project Australia for Next Wave 2016, a touring exhibition for ART ON THE MOVE and worked for Artsource. She also participated in the Australia Council Emerging Arts Professionals Program for the Venice Biennale in May 2019.

Danielle Fusco

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Danielle Fusco is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and collaborator from Whadjuk Noongar Boodjar/ Perth, Western Australia. Danielle is passionate about supporting early career artists and producing innovative, exciting and engaging cultural experiences for the community, outside of an institutional framework where possible. In 2018 Danielle graduated from the University of Melbourne with a Master of Art Curatorship. Between 2018 and 2019 Danielle was the gallery manager for Perth based artist-run initiative Paper Mountain. Her independent curatorial projects include Trace-makers (2018), What makes a Mountain (2019), and Speak softly, carry a big stick (2020)Most recently Danielle has been working on a community arts project, Forward Bound, a roving exhibition program sponsored by the City of Vincent Perth (2020). By working in two ways simultaneously, Danielle reflects on her role as a contemporary curator, striving to contribute to meaningful change and genuine impact within the arts and cultural landscape.

Emily Wakeling

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Emily Wakeling is Assistant Curator at Artspace Mackay and recently held the role of Assistant Curator, Asian and Pacific Art, at the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art for the 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art. Working across curating, art writing, and museum learning, Emily spent six years in Tokyo in multiple arts-related roles including Editor of the arts website Tokyo Art Beat. As Co-director of Brisbane art space Boxcopy, Emily curated a program of local Indigenous and non-indigenous artists as well as “All We Can Do is Pray,” a group exhibition of Japan-based artists finding parallels between Japanese survivors of World War II and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami.

Her curatorial projects are spread across Japan and Australia, including solo exhibitions of Archie Moore and Courtney Coombs in Tokyo art spaces, and the Japanese group exhibition “Come Close: Japanese Artists within their Communities” at Bus Projects, Melbourne. Emily is also a long-serving freelance writer who has contributed to Artforum, ArtAsiaPacific, Japan Times, Tokyo Art Beat, Art Review Asia, Real Tokyo, Eyeline and Art Monthly Australia.

Olivia Welch

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Olivia Welch is an arts and cultural professional working as the Gallery Programs & Touring Exhibitions Coordinator for Museums & Galleries of NSW. Her research and curatorial interests are in sharing the stories of those culturally and linguistically outside of Australia’s advertised grand narrative, and looking into practices that interrogate the colonial foundations of the museum through the permanent collection and its collection policies.

Most recently she curated Our Common Bond for MAY SPACE, Sydney. She has also worked as an exhibitions and curatorial assistant, researcher and editor at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum’s Modern Collection in Lisbon, Portugal.

Perri Sparnon 

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Perri Sparnon is a curator and researcher based in Melbourne. She has been a research associate at The University of Adelaide’s Centre for Asian and Middle Eastern Architecture (CAMEA) since 2015, where she facilitated the development of a series of international conferences, exhibitions and publications including the landmark ‘Ilm: Science, Religion and Art in Islam. She has also contributed curatorial research to projects at the Art Gallery of South Australia, Art Gallery of Western Australia and Islamic Museum of Australia. She is currently the managing editor of Index Journal (www.index-journal.org), Australia’s only online peer-reviewed art history journal. Perri’s research focuses upon the art and architectural histories of the Islamic world in Western and Southeast Asia. Her publications in this area include ‘Science and Art: Anatomical illustration in early Islamic optics’ (2019). In 2018, she was awarded the International Council of Museums Australia’s International Museum Day essay prize for a paper on hyperconnected museums.

Priya Pavri 

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Priya Pavri is an independent curator currently based in Narrm/Birraranga (Melbourne, Australia). Her work explores how art can address issues of social and political importance and present layered and complex truths, while building empathy and understanding for experiences and stories outside one’s own.

With a background in Law and Arts, Priya has lead community projects in the not-for-profit and government sector in urban and remote Australia, the Middle East and Asia Pacific. She is currently the General Manager of Next Wave Festival, an Australian arts organisation that is committed to a world where artists and audiences from all backgrounds can come together to participate in ground breaking new art and ideas; the Director of Road to Refuge, not-for-profit organisation that provides platforms for refugee voices in their words and on their terms, and a co-founder of ‘I Had One Too’ an online platform to share stories about abortion, and discuss how laws and public perceptions impact safe and accessible women’s health services in Australia.

Priya has a history of growing community projects and organisations through unique and creative endeavours, and is committed to seeking alternative models of working with community that challenge existing leadership and governance structures.

In 2019, Priya received a Carclew Fellowship for Social Justice and the Arts, to develop a curatorial and film practice. Most recently, she curated Illusion a multi-venue exhibition on Kaurna Country (Adelaide, Australia).

Sebastian Henry-Jones

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Sebastian Henry-Jones is an emerging curator lead by an interest in writing, DIY thinking and the potential of the exhibition format to cultivate strategies of collectivity, social responsibility and tenderness that poetically communicate across cultural and social difference. He looks to embody these ideals in his work by centring the needs, ideas and requirements of those that he works with, and so his practice is informed by striving for a personal ethics with sincerity, generosity, honest communication and learning at its core.

Seb has staged group exhibitions and independent projects in Sydney and interstate, and is a co-founder of Desire Lines and Emerson. He is a board member at Runway Journal, and has most recently worked as a curatorial assistant for The 22nd Biennale of Sydney, titled NIRIN.

 Tian Zhang

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Tian Zhang is a curator and producer working at the intersections of art and cultural practice. Her work often involves a recalibration of rituals and cultural phenomena within our understandings of contemporary art and life. Her curatorial work has been nominated for a MGNSW Imagine Award, and presented at Customs House Sydney, Peacock Gallery in Auburn, Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Arts and Metro Arts, Brisbane.

Tian is a founding co-director of Pari, a new artist-run initiative for Parramatta and formerly Chair and co-director of Firstdraft (2018-9). She has experience working across disciplines, most notably as producer at Urban Theatre Projects where she created multiple award-winning socially-engaged and site-specific works for Sydney Festival (Bankstown:Live, 2015 and Home Country, 2017) and a documentary on ABC’s Compass (One Day For Peace, 2015). She is an alumni of the Australia Council for the Arts’ Future Leaders Program 2018 and the British Council’s INTERSECT Program 2019 for changemakers.

Wilson Yeung 

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Wilson Yeung Chun Wai is an artist-curator, researcher and creative producer. He is currently a PhD candidate at the School of Architecture and Urban Design at RMIT University. Wilson is a collaborator of Independent Curators International and an alumnus of Shanghai Curator Lab at Shanghai Academy of Fine Arts, Shanghai University.

Wilson’s special interest lies in collective curatorial practices and Asian contemporary art in an Australian context. His practice-based research ‘Curating the In-Between’ focuses on exploring the role of curators and curatorial practices in order to develop collective curatorial strategies and frameworks. This research articulates curatorial practice that interrogates the role of a curator in facilitating cross-cultural collaborations as a ‘cultural collaborator’.

Wilson’s works have been presented nationally and internationally, including Jogja Biennale, Shenzhen Bi-city Biennale of Urbanism/Architecture, Ballarat International Foto Biennale, Pingyao International Photography Festival, Fine Art Asia, Hong Kong Art Centre, Ox Warehouse Macau, International Multidisciplinary Printmaking Conference and AAANZ Conference.

LUNAR NEW YEAR // Moon Gates by Louise Zhang

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SYDNEY

DARLING HARBOUR

25 January – 9 February

To celebrate Lunar New Year 2020 in the Darling Harbour precinct, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) is creating a special installation to mark the festival. On 25 January 2020, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art will start celebrating the 2020 Lunar New Year with a series of colourful Lunar New Year Moon Gates designed by Sydney based artist Louise Zhang. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for the Lunar New Year, Louise’s work will see the Darling Harbour Precinct come to life with colourful facades that invite visitors to walk through and feel good fortune ahead of the year of the rat. A traditional architectural element of many Chinese Gardens and with different spiritual meanings, each of Zhang’s bright moon gate’s will feature highly detailed traditional floral motifs, celebrating Lunar New Year. Beautifully detailed lilies will feature prominently on each gate with the lily considered to be the most lucky flower for this year’s zodiac.

Louise Zhang (born 1991) is a Chinese-Australian multidisciplinary artist whose practice spans painting, sculpture and installation. Zhang explores the dynamics of aesthetics, contrasting the attractive and repulsive in order to navigate the senses of fear, anxiety and a sense of otherness reflecting her identity. Her work is inspired by horror cinema, Chinese mythology and botany, adopting and placing symbols and motifs in compositions of harmonic dissonance. Zhang’s solo exhibitions include Art eats its young, 2018, Artereal Gallery, Sydney; Soft Horror, 2017, Organhaus, Chongqing, (China); and Human Jerky: meatbags through the eyes of technology and Emotions invented by the Internet, 2018 Verge Gallery, Sydney. Her clients include City of Sydney, Apple, Lendlease and the Australian Embassy, Beijing. Zhang is represented by Artereal Gallery.

See the gates outside the Chinese Garden of Friendship in the Darling Harbour Precinct throughout the Lunar New Year festival from 25 January – 9 February 2020.

Image: courtesy Louise Zhang.

CLUB 4A: TROPPO GALAKTIKA PRESENTS: SALTY BITCH

From 5PM, 25 January, 2020, meet at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
$25 +bf. Buy tickets here

 

Club 4A returns for a third year in 2020, programmed as part of Sydney Festival. Club 4A is all about taking performance art back to the club.

 

CLUB 4A: TROPPO GALAKTIKA PRESENTS: SALTY BITCH

 

TROPPO GALAKTIKA is proud to present SALTY BITCH. Beginning at 4A we gather to move in performance procession to the club / SALTY BITCH is resistance and agitation / SALTY BITCH is sweat rimmed flavour / SALTY BITCH is stank face riding dancefloors / SALTY BITCH is cool breeze evaporation leading SALTY BITCH to invigilate on Barangaroo

 

Curated by the amazing Troppo Galaktika, as part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and UNSW Galleries exhibition Wansolwara: One Salt Water, for Club 4A’s third iteration expect performances, music, dance and just the right amount of salt. Meet at 4A at 5PM on January 25 to be taken to a secret location.

 

Starting the night with new work from artist Nadeena Dixon, make sure you arrive at 4A between 5-6PM to join us as we make our way from the gallery to the club – with the location for our night-long party only released on the day!

 

Club 4A: Troppo Galaktika presents: SALTY BITCH features performances throughout the night from Seini “SistaNative” Taumoepeau, Bhenji Ra, and STELLY G, wearable art from Luna Aquatica, a visual feast from VJ Vaxxx on the club screen, soundtracked by sets from DJ Sista Agz, DJ SOVTRAX, AYEBATONYE, KILIMI + more.

 

Tickets will sell out – so get yours now here.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Nadeena Dixon – Artist

Seini “SistaNative” Taumoepeau- OceaniaX Orator & Songwoman

Bhenji Ra – Performance Artist

STELLY G – Performance Artist

Luna Aquatica – Wearable Artist

VJ Vaxxx – VJ

 

ABOUT THE DJs:

DJ Sista Agz

DJ SOVTRAX

AYEBATONYE

KILIMI

 


ABOUT 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art fosters excellence and innovation in contemporary Asian and Australian culture through research, documentation, development, discussion and presentation of contemporary visual art. We believe that Asian cultural thinking will have an important impact on the future. 4A’s aim is to ensure contemporary visual art plays a central role in understanding the dynamic relationship between Australia and the Asia-Pacific region. 4A has a distinctive approach to addressing Australia’s cultural diversity through a dynamic program including local and international exhibitions, public programs, workshops, seminars, symposiums and community activities. These have been recognised locally and internationally as having raised awareness of Asian-Australian art and culture and Australia’s place in the Asia-Pacific region.

WORKSHOP // Zodiac Flower Charm Workshops with Louise Zhang

Louise Zhang is a Sydney-based multidisciplinary artist whose practice spans painting, sculpture and installation. With an interest in cinema – specifically, theatrical horror – Louise explores the dichotomies between what is attractive and monstrous. She appreciates ‘otherness’ – the under-appreciated and overlooked – and brings new life to kitsch materials through playful and whimsical creative processes. This workshop series will be drawing from her practice to encourage young creatives to be inspired by the decorative architecture of

the Gardens and create their own individualistic, unique charm flower! Get ready for Lunar New Year 2020 this school holidays at the Chinese Garden of Friendship, joining Louise to make lucky charms that feature Chinese zodiac flowers. In this two-hour workshop, learn about the (sometimes surprising) meaning and uses of each zodiac sign's
flower and create your own flower as part of a special take-home hanging charm inspired by Louise’s work – the perfect Lunar New Year accessory or gift for family. After the workshops, come back to Darling Harbour during Lunar New Year festival to see Louise’s work come to life in a series of special Moon Gates to walk through. For participants aged between 7-17 years, accompanied by a responsible adult. All materials provided, with bookings online required to ensure all participants get to complete their take-home charm flower. Places are limited for each workshop, which is free with entry to the Chinese Garden of Friendship.


Louise Zhang ( b.1991) is a Sydney-based multidisciplinary artist whose practice spans painting, sculpture and installation. With an interest in horror cinema, particularly the body horror genre, Zhang is interested in the dynamics between the attractive and repulsive. By exploring how themes of perceived innocence such as prettiness and cuteness can be contrasted with notions of the perverse and monstrous, Zhang explores the intersection of fear, anxiety and a sense of otherness in the construction of identity. Zhang’s solo exhibitions include Art eats its young, 2018, Artereal Gallery, Sydney; Soft Horror, 2017, Organhaus, Chongqing, (China); and Human Jerky: meatbags through the eyes of technology and Emotions invented by the Internet, 2018 Verge Gallery, Sydney. Her clients include City of Sydney, Apple, Lendlease and the Australian Embassy, Beijing. Zhang is represented by Artereal Gallery.

All materials provided, with bookings online required to ensure all participants get to complete their take-home charm flower. Places are limited for each workshop, which is free with entry to the Chinese Garden of Friendship. Register online at 

This workshop has been produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour.

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4A’s artist-led workshops throughout 2019 are supported by Create NSW’s Audience Development Fund, a devolved funding program administered by Museums & Galleries of NSW on behalf of the NSW Government.

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Image: Courtesy Louise Zhang.

Phaptawan Suwannakudt: Turtles, a Fish, and Ghosts…

July 5th to July 27th 2002

Turtles, a Fish, and Ghosts... is a solo exhibition featuring works by artist Phaptawan Suwannakudt.

Artist’s Statement:

I have worked on mural projects in temples and other public spaces during the fifteen years before I moved to Australia in 1996.  My works had largely been involved with Buddhist themes such as the Life of the Buddha or the Narratives of Buddha’s Previous Lives.  Now I live and work in Australia, my works have changed accordingly.  They involve more of my own experience and personal life.

The work is the exhibition Turtles, a Fish and Ghosts… are from 1999-2002.  They include earlier work about the lives of the Buddha in which I chose to work on a six-panel screen instead of on the wall.

The other works are later and reflect my experience in Australia.  The four sets of triptychs, Earth, Wind, Water, and Fire depict my reaction to Australian scenes through the interpretation of Thai pictorial elements.  The division of subject matter in these works is as if we are looking out through the window from the inside of a temple.  This view comes from my habit of looking out at things when I had to work mural paintings around the door and window space on the temple wall.

Another group of works from the same period reflects on my life in the past, recorded as a memory flash-back.  One pair of paintings is about my brother’s ordination which took place not long before moving to Australia.  The other pair records my experience at nine years of age when I was mesmerized by a grand Buddhist ceremony in a Thai temple, with monks chanting for days and nights over rows of hundreds and thousands of newly cast Buddha statues.

The exhibition Turtles, a Fish and Ghosts… shows the transition of my work when moving into another country, as well as sees the possibility of using skill in narrative painting for a new and different way of looking.


Acknowledgements

This project has been assisted by the Commonwealth Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Thanks also go to Sherman Galleries, Roslyn Oxley Gallery, Robert Lindsay Gallery, Span Galleries and Gallery 4A.

Phaptawan Suwannakudt is represented by Span Galleries, Melbourne.

4A is Certified Climate Active

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is pleased to announce that we have been certified as a Climate Active carbon neutral organisation, set by the Australian Government Department of Environment and Energy. As a founding member of Climate Active, 4A is only the second arts organisation in NSW to be certified, along with the Sydney Opera House.

As one of the goals in 4A’s Sustainability Plan (2018-19), Climate Active certification has allowed our organisation to measure a base year of emissions, reduce these where possible, offset remaining emissions and set sustainable goals moving forward. 4A has committed to measuring our carbon footprint yearly, with external auditing to occur every three years to ensure goals and KPIs are addressed long term.

Undertaking the certification process has enabled 4A to identify the different areas our organisation could address to improve sustainability. Within our gallery building these include our electricity usage, freight, catering, waste-to-landfill, recycling, advertising, paper usage, printing and office IT. Beyond this we were able to understand the scope of carbon generated by our offsite programs including exhibitions, performances, symposiums, research trips, professional development opportunities, travel and accommodation for staff, artists, writers and professionals that we employ. Certification has engaged all 4A staff in collecting data to measure our carbon footprint and encouraged a working culture that is conscious of reducing this footprint where possible.

4A’s sustainability priorities are first and foremost to reduce energy consumption and waste that we can already identify, whilst approaching carbon offsetting as a last resort for the aspects of our footprint that we are working to reduce. In the 2018 calendar year, 4A produced a total of 138.9 tCO2-e. Our offset purchases were split equally three ways; Forests Alive (Tasmania), Rimba Raya Biodiversity Reserve Project (Central Kalimantan, Indonesia) and Dachunhe Sanji Hydropower (Yunnan Province, China). 4A chose these three offset projects to reflect our engagement across Australia and the wider Asia region. 

 

Tane Andrews botanical illustration workshop

SYD CHINESE GARDEN OF FRIENDSHIP.  3.00 – 5.00PM, SAT 30 NOV 2019.

This summer at the Chinese Garden of Friendship, join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Sydney artist Tane Andrews for a special one-off botanical workshop – over drinks and snacks!

In making artworks, Tane works with perishable organic materials including; flowers, living cocoons, wood, and water, as well as more durable products such as pearls, marble and bronze.

In this workshop, small groups of participants will work with Tane to go on an adventure through the Chinese Garden of Friendship and select and sketch inspiration from the Garden. Learn about the skills used by Tane – including botanical identification, sketching and colour – to re-create nature and create your own botanical illustration to take home, all over drinks and snacks at the Gardens by Lotus.

This special one-off event has limited places available, with a drink on arrival and all supplies included – and is free with entry to the Chinese Garden of Friendship.

Sat 30th Nov, 3pm-5pm, Chinese Garden of Friendship, Pier St, Darling Harbour

This workshop has been produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour.

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UNSW Art & Design presents at 4A: Contemporary Chinese Art, Aesthetic Modernity and Zhang Peili: Towards a Critical Contemporaneity

SYDNEY. 6-8PM, THU 21 NOV.

4A CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART

Free but registrations required.

Join Paul Gladston, Inaugural Judith Neilson Professor of Contemporary Art at UNSW, in conversation about his latest book – with Alan Cruickshank, editor of di’van | A Journal of Accounts at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: 

About the book Contemporary Chinese Art, Aesthetic Modernity and Zhang Peili: Towards a Critical Contemporaneity:

In recent decades the previously assumed dominance within the international art world of western(ized) conceptions of aesthetic modernity has been challenged by a critically becalming diversification of cultural outlooks widely referred to as ‘contemporaneity’. Contributing to that diversification are assertions within mainland China of essential differences between Chinese and other artistic cultures.

 In response to the critical impasse posed by contemporaneity, Paul Gladston charts a historical relay of mutually formative interactions between western(ised) post-Enlightenment artworlds and those prevalent historically and contemporaneously within China as part of a new transcultural theory of artistic criticality. Informed by deconstructivism as well as syncretic Confucianism, Gladston extends this theory to a reading of the work of the artist Zhang Peili and his involvement with the Hangzhou-based art group, the Pond Association (Chi she). Revealed is a critical aesthetic productively resistant to any single interpretative viewpoint, including those of Chinese exceptionalism and the supposed immanence of deconstructivist uncertainty.

Addressing art in and from the People’s Republic of China as a significant aspect of post-West contemporaneity, Gladston provides a new critical understanding of what it means to be ‘contemporary’ and the profound changes taking place in the art world today.

“essential reading for a better understanding of contemporary Chinese art and visual culture in the global context.”

–  Jason C. Kuo, Professor of Chinese Art, University of Maryland, USA

“a landmark work both in terms of cultural-criticism and art-historical analysis”

–  Paul Manfredi, Professor of Chinese, Pacific Lutheran University, USA

“anchor[s] reflections on issues of immense contemporary importance”

– Johnson Chang, Curatorial Director, Hanart TZ Gallery, Hong Kong

“an important contribution to critical discourse on contemporary art”

–  Birgit Hopfener, Associate Professor of Art History, Carleton University, Canada

About the speakers:

Paul Gladston is the inaugural Judith Neilson Professor of Contemporary Art at the University of New South Wales and was previously Professor of Contemporary Visual Cultures and Critical Theory at the University of Nottingham. Paul has written extensively on contemporary Chinese art with regard to the concerns of critical theory and, in doing so, has been formative on the development of a critically informed contemporary Chinese art studies both internationally and inside China. His recent book-length publications include Contemporary Chinese Art: A Critical History (2014), which received ‘publication of the year’ at the Awards of Art China 2015. He was founding principal editor of the peer-reviewed Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art from 2014 to 2017 and an academic adviser to the internationally acclaimed exhibition Art of Change: New Directions from China staged at the Hayward Gallery-South Bank Centre London in 2012.

Alan Cruickshank is the founding editor and publisher of di’van | A Journal of Accounts, a new journal now in its third year offering critical interpretations on contemporary visual art and its art-historical, theoretical and socio-political contexts in the greater Asia-Pacific region. Alan was previously Executive Director of the Contemporary Art Centre of SA, Adelaide and Editor of Broadsheet magazine between 2000 and 2015. He is currently Honorary Fellow, Centre for Visual Arts, Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne.

Exhibition opening: On the Move: The Dion Family

WOLLONGONG ART GALLERY

46 Burelli St, Wollongong NSW 2500

1.30-3.30PM

1 DECEMBER 2019

Delving through more than a century of the Dion family, an indelible part of the Illawarra’s social fabric as members of the Chinese diaspora and operators of the region’s bus services, On the Move tells a story of migration, survival, acceptance and community spirit of a remarkable family through archival material and responses from contemporary artists.

Exhibition artists: Matt Chun, Pia Johnson and Naomi Segal.

Curator: Mikala Tai

On the Move: The Dion Family is exhibited at Wollongong Art Gallery from 1 December 2019 – 26 February 2020. The exhibition is produced and presented by Wollongong Art Gallery in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art with support from The Dion Family.

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Slow Boat to Nerrigundah: The Dion family & the golden gardens of the Chinese diaspora on the South Coast of NSW

 

WOLLONGONG. SAT 25 JANUARY, 1.00 PM – 3.30 PM 

Join a talk by historian and author Dr Joseph Davis. Followed by an Open mic: Read your poetry or prose on the theme of bus travel, the Dion Family exhibition, or an anecdote about traveling on a Dion bus (5 minutes per participant).

Free, all welcome. 

This program is part of the exhibition On The Move: The Dion Family.

Produced and presented by Wollongong Art Gallery in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and the South Coast Writers Centre with support from The Dion Family.

 

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Family Ties: tracing a legacy through art

WOLLONGONG. WED 4 DECEMBER, 1.00 PM – 2.00 PM 

 

Join curator Mikala Tai and artist Naomi Segal as they discuss the process of approaching a family legacy through the lens of contemporary art.

Wednesday 4 December

Free, all welcome. 

This program is part of the exhibition On The Move: The Dion Family.

Produced and presented by Wollongong Art Gallery in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art with support from The Dion Family.

 

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Please Explain: who is picking the fruit?

4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. In this edition of Please Explain, as part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art exhibition John Vea: If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back? speakers discuss the realities and unrepresented stories in contemporary globalised era migrant labour, which emerged as a key indicator of regional socio-economic relationships between Australia, New Zealand and many Pacific nations.

Taking the words of Australian deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack – who echoed the title of Vea’s exhibition when he came under fire for claiming the Pacific Islands will survive climate change because their workers come here to “pick our fruit”, following the August 2019 Pacific Island Forum in Tuvalu – as a starting point, this discussion will question such preconceptions about temporary migrant labour, and discuss the lived experience of the migrant worker.

Framed by Vea’s 2015 text The Emic Avenue; art through Talanoa and the concept of talanoa (a process of inclusive, participatory and transparent dialogue) as research method, speakers Christine Afoa, Malaemie Fruean, Leo Tanoi  and John Vea, with moderator Micheal Do, will discuss the stories, experiences and representations of Pacific migrant workers and the role art and storytelling can play in reframing and challenging the ideas of equality and validity of a global workforce.

Moderator: Micheal Do, 4A Assistant Curator and John Vea: If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back? curator with Dr Mikala Tai.

Speakers:

Christine Afoa is a Samoan-Australian writer born and raised in the Bankstown area. She is undertaking a creative writing degree at the University of Technology. Christine has performed poetry for SoFar Sounds Lounge and Bankstown Poetry Slam and her short stories have been published in UTS Writers’ Anthology 2018: Light Borrowers, 2019: Infinite Threads and Sweatshop Women: Volume One. Christine is a member of Sweatshop: Western Sydney Literacy Movement.

Malaemie Fruean is Chair, NSW Council for Pacific Communities. Established in 2003, the organisation was established to create opportunities and lend support to Pacific Communities in New South Wales, Fruean has led the organisation since its inception. Prior to this Fruean worked in community, cultural development for over two decades with experience as an educator and community liaison and leader.

Leo Tanoi is a creative producer specialising in Pacific contemporary arts practice. With over two decades of experience, Tanoi has held a number of roles and worked with artists including Greg Semu, Shigeyuki Kihara, Angela Tiatia and Michel Tufferey. From 2010 – 2015, Tanoi was the Creative Producer, Pacific Programs at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre. In this time, he developed a number of projects including ‘Body Pacifica’ (2010) which won the Museums & Galleries NSW’s Imagine Award for Best Exhibition and Public Engagement Program. Prior to this, Tanoi contributed to ‘Edge of Elsewhere’ as a community and cultural advisor on ‘Edge of Elsewhere’ (2010 – 2012), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Campbelltown Arts Centre. Tanoi currently is a freelance Creative Producer in the arts & culture sector and has been a peer assessor for Create NSW from 2016-2019. He is also an aspiring visual artist.

John Vea is an Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland) based artist who works with sculpture, video and performance art. Vea works with tropes of migration and gentrification that exist within Moana Nui a Kiwa (the Pacific Ocean). By enacting stories that have been collected through everyday interactions with people, both in his home community and abroad, with a journalistic sensibility he offers a sometimes humorous and always powerfully symbolic emic viewpoint to the Western meta narrative.

Listen to a recording of the event below:

WORKSHOP // Botanical Textile Workshops with Victoria Garcia

Victoria Garcia is a Filipino-Australian artist and textile designer based in Sydney. Through drawing, textile design and interactive installations, Victoria creates heavily patterned, immersive environments which both question and reenact her Filipino Australian identity, narratives of colonialism, and her deep connection to the landscape. Victoria has been commissioned by major brands and companies including Warner Brothers Productions, Microsoft and Sass and Bide.

For the September/October School Holidays at the Chinese Garden of Friendship, join Sydney artist and designer Victoria Garcia for a special series of textile art workshops. In this workshop, small groups of participants will work with Victoria to learn the basics of botanical illustration, taking the surrounds of the Chinese Garden of Friendship as inspiration. Then, work with Victoria to turn your illustration into a piece of textile art, illustrating a fabric artwork that you can take home.

For participants aged between 7-18 years, accompanied by a responsible adult. All materials provided, with bookings online encouraged to ensure all participants get to complete their take-home artwork.

About the artist: Victoria Garcia is a Filipino-Australian artist and textile designer based in Sydney. Through drawing, textile design and interactive installations, Garcia creates heavily patterned, immersive environments which both question and reenact her Filipino Australian identity, narratives of colonialism, and her deep connection to the landscape. Garcia has been commissioned by major brands and companies including Warner Brothers Productions, Microsoft and Sass and Bide, and has produced large-scale public artworks for Wollongong Central and Ambush Gallery (2017), Broadway Shopping Centre (2016) and Oxford Art Factory (2013). In 2017 Garcia was awarded the Southlands Breakthrough Emerging Artist Award from Penrith Performing and Visual Arts and a Summer Studio Residency with Penrith Regional Gallery. Her work has been featured in ‘PATTERNBOX’ curated by The Textile Art Centre New York, and published by Princeton Architectural Press.

With a strong background in design and visual art, she works across fashion textiles and illustration, homewares, interiors, and costume/film. Victoria’s approach to art and design has been heavily influenced by her illustrative work and she specializes in creating hand drawn imagery and pattern. She is currently represented by illustration agency International Rescue.

Victoria Garcia’s Textile Art Workshops are produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with the Chinese Garden of Friendship for the September/October 2019 school holidays program. 4A’s artist-led workshops throughout 2019 are supported by Create NSW’s Audience Development Fund, a devolved funding program administered by Museums & Galleries of NSW on behalf of the NSW Government.

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Congee Breakfast Tour: Nusra Latif Qureshi: Strategies of Intent

SYDNEY. SAT 28 SEPTEMBER, 11.00AM – 12.30PM

Departing from 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Join exhibiting artist Nusra Latif Qureshi, Curator Dr Mikala Tai and Curatorial Assistant Nanette Orly for a special exhibition tour of Strategies of Intent, followed by a traditional Chinatown breakfast at a much-loved local eatery where attendees will discuss some of the stories and ideas behind the Nusra’s works and the themes explored in the exhibition.

About the exhibition: Nusra Latif Qureshi’s first solo Australian institutional exhibition presents her ongoing investigation into the symbolism and assumptions embedded in art history. Reflecting on almost two decades of practice Qureshi’s attempts to undermine, shift and negate historical imagery reads as a warning for the contemporary age, where assumed realities can be little more than constructed visions.

Qureshi’s practice is characterised by meticulous layering, fragmentation, erasure and juxtaposition of visual material. Through such intervention, she investigates little known histories of colonial eras, questions established narratives and engages with the politics of representation. Through an examination of the visual histories of the South Asian region Qureshi has developed a new visual vernacular in which to examine and interrogate the act of historicisation.

Strategies of Intent brings together key works from Qureshi’s oeuvre as well as a series of new commissions by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. These commissions are Qureshi’s most ambitious to date and include a series of installations that draw on key colonial imagery, engage with the reverence of weaponry and critique the museological convention of collecting and ownership.

Nusra Latif Qureshi (b. Lahore, Pakistan, lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) attended the National College of Arts, Lahore and completed her Masters of Fine Art at the University of Melbourne. Qureshi’s practices engages with the visual histories of the South Asian region and Australian culture, questioning conventional interpretations, pulling apart and reconfiguring the found patterns to construct new narratives. Her work has been exhibited widely in Austria, Germany, New Zealand, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Afghanistan, Italy, India, Japan, France, Switzerland, Finland and her home countries of Pakistan and Australia. Most recently she was exhibited at the Kunst Historisches Museum, Vienna, Austria as well as Brisbane’s QAG/GOMA. Her work has been collected widely including the British Museum, London, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Qureshi is represented by Sutton Gallery, Melbourne and is currently the artist in residence at the Lyceum Club, Melbourne.

All Aboard! The moving tale of Dion’s Bus Service workshops

WOLLONGONG. TUES 3 and THURS 5 DECEMBER 2019, 10AM – 12PM

All Aboard! The moving tale of Dion’s Bus Service Celebration of Abilities Week workshops with Angie Cass. Make a collage of a bus and make it travel from Austinmer to Kiama using the magic of stop motion animation. You’ll use photos and colourful printed paper to recreate the routes of the Dions’ buses in the Illawarra.

Free, bookings and enquires email vvidulich@wollongong.nsw.gov.au or phone 02 4227 850

This program is part of the exhibition On The Move: The Dion Family.

Produced and presented by Wollongong Art Gallery in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art with support from The Dion Family.

 

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John Birchmeier in-conversation with Les Dion

WOLLONGONG. WED 4 DECEMBER, 11.00 AM – 12.00 PM 

Representing the third generation of the Dion family, Les Dion together with family historian John Birchmeier will present an overview of the family background; the arrival of the first generation in Wollongong in 1907 to take up market gardening and development from 1923 of new business interests including bus services under the second generation.

Free, all welcome. 

This program is part of the exhibition On The Move: The Dion Family.

Produced and presented by Wollongong Art Gallery in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art with support from The Dion Family.

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Please Explain: Do colonial objects still hold power?

SYDNEY. SATURDAY 24 AUGUST 2019.

Program Moderator: Dr Mikala Tai

Program Speakers: Damian McDonald, Nusra Latif Qureshi, Professor Mary Roberts

4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. In this edition of Please Explain, as part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art exhibition Nusra Latif Qureshi: Strategies of Intentspeakers discuss the mobility of meaning and challenges presented by historical objects and imagery in a post-Orientalist world. Taking the work of artist Nusra Latif Qureshi and the text Networked Objects (2013) by Mary Roberts as a starting point, this discussion will ask whether Colonial objects still hold potency today in institutions and artistic practice; and investigate how artists and curators can work to challenge and engage with constructed histories of objects in shifting contexts.

Reading Recommendation: Mary Roberts, Networked Objects, 2013, Department of Art History and Film Studies, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Speaker Profiles:

| Moderator: 
| Dr Mikala Tai is the director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. As a curator, researcher, and academic specialising in contemporary Asian art, she has collaborated with local, national, and international organisations to strengthen ties between Australia and Asia. Recent curatorial projects at 4A include “The Burrangong Affray” (co-curated with Micheal Do, 2018), “Before the Rain” (2017); “I don’t want to be there when it happens” (co-curated with Kate Warren and expanded at Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts with Eugenio Viola, 2017); and “Jogja Calling” (2016). She received critical acclaim for her organization of the performance program at Art Central Hong Kong (2016 -2018). Her independent curatorial projects include “Trompe-l’œil” (Sullivan + Strumpf Singapore, 2018) “Abdullah M.I. Syed: Diving Economy—Structures” (Aicon Gallery, New York, 2017), “Closing the Gap: Contemporary Indonesian Art” (Melbourne International Fine Art, 2011), and “Yang Yongliang: On the Quiet Water” (Fortyfivedownstairs, Melbourne, 2009). Tai has taught at Monash University, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), and the University of Melbourne in both undergraduate and postgraduate programs. Tai’s writing can be found in several exhibition catalogues in addition to periodicals such as Broadsheet Journal, Art Monthly Australiasia, Photofile, Vault, and Ocula. In 2015, Tai received her PhD, focusing on the influence of the global city on China’s local art infrastructure.

| Damian McDonald’s principal research areas are firearms and edged weapons, and how they are influenced by, and influence culture, as well as their design. He is interested in health and medicine, particularly the history of the material culture of the discipline, and the ways society’s notions around health and medicine change under the continuing advances in this area. His interests also include music and musical instruments, particularly rock music and the Australian underground music scene, subcultures of the 1970s and 80s and their influences on contemporary youth culture, and the material culture of computer technology.

| Nusra Latif Qureshi (b. Lahore, Pakistan, lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) attended the National College of Arts, Lahore and completed her Masters of Fine Art at the University of Melbourne. Qureshi’s practices engages with the visual histories of the South Asian region and Australian culture, questioning conventional interpretations, pulling apart and reconfiguring the found patterns to construct new narratives. Her work has been exhibited widely in Austria, Germany, New Zealand, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Afghanistan, Italy, India, Japan, France, Switzerland, Finland and her home countries of Pakistan and Australia. Most recently she was exhibited at the Kunst Historisches Museum, Vienna, Austria as well as Brisbane’s QAG/GOMA. Her work has been collected widely including the British Museum, London, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Qureshi is represented by Sutton Gallery, Melbourne and is currently the artist in residence at the Lyceum Club, Melbourne.

| Professor Mary Roberts is the John Schaeffer Professor of Art History. She specializes in nineteenth-century British and Ottoman art with particular expertise in Orientalism, the history of artistic exchanges between the Ottoman Empire and Europe and the culture of travel. Her books include: Istanbul Exchanges. Ottomans, Orientalists and Nineteenth-century visual culture (University of California Press, 2015), Intimate Outsiders. The Harem in Ottoman and Orientalist Art and Travel Literature (Duke, 2007) and four co-edited books: The Poetics and Politics of Place. Ottoman Istanbul and British Orientalism (Pera Museum and University of Washington Press, 2011) Edges of Empire. Orientalism and Visual Culture (Blackwells, 2005), Orientalism’s Interlocutors, (Duke, 2002) and Refracting Vision. Essays on the Writings of Michael Fried (Power Publications, 2000/2012).

In Conversation: FX Harsono x Ida Lawrence

FAIRFIELD CITY MUSEUM & GALLERY – Saturday 13 July – Saturday 12 October 2019.

Join us to celebrate the opening of In Conversation: FX Harsono x Ida Lawrence, a cross-generational and cross-cultural dialogue between internationally renowned Indonesian artist FX Harsono and Australian-Indonesian artist Ida Lawrence.

Curated by Emily Rolfe and Bianca Winataputri, the exhibition presents a new body of work by Ida Lawrence alongside the seminal work, Writing in the Rain, 2011, by FX Harsono.
The exhibition is the result of a partnership between Fairfield City Museum & Gallery and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art through the 4A Curators’ Intensive Program, 2018.

2019 4A Beijing Studio Program Recipients Announced

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is pleased to announce the participants in our 2019 4A Beijing Studio Program.

Jessica Bradford, Owen Leong and Emily Parsons-Lord have been selected to embark on a month-long residency in September 2019 at the studios renowned Chinese-Australian artist Shen Shaomin.

The 4A Beijing Studio is now in its seventh year of providing early and mid career Australian artists with a unique opportunity to research new projects, develop new professional networks and witness first-hand the changes occurring in one of the most vibrant cities in Asia.

Jessica Bradford, Owen Leong and Emily Parsons-Lord were selected by a committee comprising Susan Acret, board member, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; Cameron Macqueen, Chief Operations Officer, ArtChain Global; Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, artist and 2016 4A Beijing Studio Resident; Natalie Seiz, Curator, Asian Art, Art Gallery of NSW; and Shen Shaomin.

Bradford, Leong and Parsons-Lord were selected based on the strength of their applications, the potential benefits for their practices and capacity to extend their own cross-cultural networks.

The 2019 4A Beijing Studio will give these artists a fantastic opportunity to place their practices within a much broader international art context in a city such as Beijing. The Studio program covers airfares, accommodation, daily meals, travel/medical insurance and a small stipend. Moreover, it will provide an ongoing professional mentorship, cross-cultural exchange and access to 4A’s networks in China.

Bradford, Leong and Parsons-Lord will travel to China in September 2019.

About Jessica Bradford

Jess Bradford is a Singaporean-born and Sydney-based artist working across painting, ceramics, video and installation. Her work explores her mixed race heritage by examining representations of cultural identity. Her current body of work explores these topics through a Chinese cultural theme park in Singapore named Tiger Balm Garden. The park exhibits painted concrete dioramas based on Chinese folklore, myths and legends. Privately built in the 1930s by the Burmese-Chinese brothers behind the medicated ointment ‘Tiger Balm’, and publicly bought in the 1980s, the park has been renovated several times by various owners to portray different representations of Chinese culture. The project questions how we define Chinese culture, while engaging with personal and collective memory and concepts of cultural inheritance.

Bradford has held solo exhibitions at Galerie Pompom, Firstdraft, and MOP Projects. Her work has been included in curated group shows at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art (2019), Delmar Gallery (2017), Bathurst Regional Art Gallery (2015), Fairfield Museum & Gallery (2014) and Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest (2013). Bradford holds an MFA by Research from Sydney College of the Arts, and was a recipient of the Australian Postgraduate Award. She has been a finalist in the Ramsay Art Prize, John Fries Memorial Prize, the Tim Olsen Drawing Prize, and the Jenny Birt Award. Bradford is represented by Galerie pompom, Sydney.

About Owen Leong

Owen Leong is a contemporary artist working across performance, photography, video and sculpture. His artistic practice uses personal mythologies to explore identity and transformation. He is interested in systems of power, culture and representation. His work uses the body, subjectivity and personhood to reflect on universal aspects of human nature.

Leong’s work has been exhibited widely in Australia and internationally including the Art Gallery of New South Wales; Art Gallery of South Australia; Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre; Monash Gallery of Art; 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; Singapore Art Museum; Today Art Museum, Beijing; Zendai Museum of Modern Art, Shanghai; OCT Contemporary Art Terminal, Shenzhen; and the National Museum of Poznan, Poland.

In 2017, Leong was a finalist in the Ramsay Art Prize, Australia’s richest prize for young contemporary artists working in any medium. In 2016 Leong was a recipient of the MAMA National Photography Prize and in 2015, he won the Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Photography Award. Leong has received numerous awards and grants from the Australia Council for the Arts, Ian Potter Cultural Trust, and Asialink. He has held artist residencies at Artspace, Sydney; Centre for Contemporary Chinese Art, Manchester; Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris; Tokyo Wonder Site, Japan; Swatch Art Peace Hotel, Shanghai; and Hong Kong Arts Centre, Hong Kong.

His work is held in the public collections of Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, Bendigo Art Gallery, Gold Coast City Gallery, Murray Art Museum Albury, Newcastle Art Gallery, and private collections in Australia and internationally.

About Emily Parsons-Lord

Emily Parsons-Lord’s artworks vanish into thin air. Creating art that exists at the fringes of natural sciences and politics, she transforms research into poetic artworks that can be inhaled, disappeared, or melt before your eyes.

Emily Parsons-Lord makes ephemeral installations and performances that are informed by research and critical dialogue with climate sciences, natural history, and politics. Her work attempts to reconcile lofty vast infinities of our place in time and space, and slippages to the political realities of being a human today in discourses of climate change. Employing tragi-humour, scale, and performance, Emily interrogates the materiality of invisibility, magic, and stories we tell about reality.

Working out of Parramatta Artist Studios, recent work includes recreating the air from past eras in Earth’s evolution, recreating starlight in coloured smoke, multichannel video, and experimenting with pheromones, aerogel, and explosions. She has exhibited both nationally and internationally and participated in Primavera, 2016, the NSW Visual Arts Fellowship, 2017, Bristol Biennial – In Other Worlds, 2016, John Fries Award, 2018, A BROKEN LINK, Central St Martin’s, London UK, 2017, and Stuttgart Film Winter Festival for Expanded Media, Firstdraft Sydney, and Vitalstatistix, Adelaide.

 

4A Beijing Studio Program 2019 is supported by ArtChain Global. 
In 2019, for the first time, this special 4A initiative is being supported by ArtChain Global, a new platform working at the intersection of blockchain technology and contemporary art. With ArtChain Global’s generous support, we are able to amplify opportunities for artists to explore the region.

2019 4A Emerging Writer’s Recipients Announced

4A is pleased to announce that the 4A Emerging Writer’s Program 2019 program recipient is studio artist, independent writer and children’s author Matt Chun. Chun will be travelling to Indonesia in 2019 and realise two publication outcomes.

Matt Chun’s successful application to the 4A Emerging Writer’s Program offered two writing proposals that demonstrated diversity in subjects. The first centres around nationalism and the colonisation/decolonisation of public space, specifically taking the historic square of Lapangan Banteng in Jakarta as a site for a discussion of the layered semiotics of monuments erected in the eras of Dutch colonial rule and post-independence Indonesia. Matt’s second proposal will see him engage with fellow artist Jumaadi’s practice within the context of the latter’s East Javanese exploration of the narrative traditions of the region, specifically his ongoing presence within communities of artists around Yogyakarta.

4A Program Manager and Editor of the 4A PapersPedro de Almeida said of the award and Chun’s success: 

“4A’s Emerging Writer’s Program, offered for the fourth consecutive year, attracted proposals from NSW, ACT, VIC and WA. The diversity of creative and professional backgrounds of applicants reflected the spirit of 4A’s professional development program as an opportunity for a broad scope of creators to engage with the arts and culture of the region. Writing proposals came from artists, curators, cultural producers, filmmakers, performers, students and, of course, emerging writers ranging from critics to poets. With Indonesia as the focus country this time round, 4A was particularly impressed by the overall depth of understanding. We congratulate Matt Chun on being selected in 2019 to undertake research in Jakarta and Yogyakarta for what promises to be two engaging original texts for publication in 4A Papers and Art Monthly Australasia.”

2019 4A Emerging Writer’s judge Anne Loxley, Senior Curator, C3West, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia said:

“Matt Chun’s proposal stood out for the originality, maturity and sophistication of his pitch to research and write about Lapangan Banteng in central Jakarta, using the monument as a means of centring a critical discussion around the colonisation/decolonisation of public space. Similarly, his second proposal to write about Jumaadi’s practice specifically within the context of his East Javanese arts community, craft practices and
narrative traditions of the region offers a refreshing attempt to situate a well-known Sydney-based artist in broader cultural relationships.”

2019 Emerging Writer’s Program judge and Art Monthly Australasia Editor, Micheal Fitzgerald, said:

“It is a pleasure continuing Art Monthly Australasia’s support for 4A’s Emerging Writer’s Program given its value in supporting writers to undertake field work in the region. Matt Chun’s submission
struck me as particularly original in its culturally nuanced approach. We look forward to working with Matt to develop his proposal for publication.”

About Matt Chun: 

Matt Chun is a studio artist, independent writer and children’s author, working from his seaside studio in Bermagui, a small town on Yuin country in regional NSW. He also divides his time between Melbourne and Taipei. Matt lives, works and travels with his 8-year-old son, making portrait, landscape and travelogue studies across a range of media. He has undertaken tenures as artist-in-residence in Australian at Casula Powerhouse, Nishi Gallery and New Acton Precinct, and in Taiwan at both Bamboo Curtain Studio and Guandu International Art Festival. His first Taiwanese solo exhibition will be held at Pon Ding Space, Taipei, in September. As a writer, Matt is primarily interested in Australian national identity and the visual culture of colonisation, combining first-person narrative reportage with field research into the semiotics of public space. His essays have appeared in Overland Literary Journal, Meanjin Quarterly and Runway Experimental Art. Matt’s second picture book for Australian publisher Little Hare is due for release in October. His first, Australian Birds, released in 2018, has been listed as a Children’s Book Council of Australia Notable Book and is currently shortlisted for the CBCA Award for Best New Illustrator. He is currently working on a graphic novel for young children.

WORKSHOP // Zine-making with Lee Tran Lam at the Chinese Garden of Friendship

Lee Tran Lam is a journalist and zine-maker based in Sydney. Her writing has appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald, Gourmet Traveller, Time Out Sydney, Rolling Stone, The Big Issue and even Turkish Vogue. She’s been making zines for more than 20 years (often about food and places) and they’ve featured in local exhibitions, libraries in Australia and the US, and Ebony Bizys’ Hello Tokyo book. She also hosts The Unbearable Lightness of Being Hungry podcast and Local Fidelity on FBi Radio.

This July school holidays, join Lee Tran for a special (and free!) zine-making workshop series at the Chinese Garden of Friendship, from July 8 – 19. In this workshop, small groups of participants will go on an adventure through the Chinese Garden of Friendship and visit in-house restaurant The Gardens by Lotus with Lee Tran. Capturing the journey with Polaroid pictures, participants will learn about what makes food fun.

Then, work with Lee Tran to turn this journey into a zine – a self-made magazine – that you can take home.

For participants aged between 6-15 years, accompanied by a responsible adult. All materials provided, with bookings online encouraged to ensure all participants get to complete their take-home artwork. Entry to all workshops in this series is free with entry to the Chinese Garden of Friendship. Book here!

 

Artist Biography:

Lee Tran Lam. Photo: Will Reichelt
Lee Tran Lam. Photo: Will Reichelt

Lee Tran Lam is a Sydney based writer, radio producer, editor and creator who works across publishing, podcasting, zine making and much more. Lam has written for The Sydney Morning Herald, Gourmet Traveller, Time Out Sydney, Rolling Stone, Good Food Guide, Good Weekend, The Lifted Brow, The Big Issue and even Turkish Vogue magazine. She has worked full-time in editorial positions for 14 years – most recently as managing editor of Inside Out and a writer and producer at the Good Food website. Lam has been presenting Local Fidelity on FBi radio since 2007. In her spare time, she runs The Unbearable Lightness of Being Hungry blog and podcast. The blog was singled out as one of the city’s best in “The Foodie’s Guide To Sydney” and the podcast was picked as a “Podcast We Love” by SBS (and a “Chef’s Favourite” by Bon Appétit) and chosen to be archived by the National Library.

Lam has also appeared on ABC radio, been a guest speaker at various festivals (such as Audiocraft, Vivid, Food and Words, National Young Writers Festival), hosted Q&As for institutions like Kinokuniya and Sydney Living Museums, featured work in several exhibitions, plus curated the food program at Underbelly Arts festival.

 

 

This workshop has been produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour.

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The Invisible Hand – Deep Dive Discussions

SYDNEY. SATURDAY JUNE 29 2.30 PM – 3.30 PM

As part of the public programming for The Invisible Hand, 4A presents a continuation of discussion after our ‘Please Explain‘ panel, with two additional deep dive discussions highlighting the most pressing issues facing users and consumers of technology and media in the Asia-Pacific. 

Data Practice: an in-conversation with Andrea Lau and Mitchell Whitelaw

2.00 PM – 3.00 PM

Data has been called ‘the new oil’ — a valuable resource that is getting increasing attention from business, government, communities and citizens. But how might we work with data from a practical, critical and creative standpoint? Andrea Lau talks with Mitchell Whitelaw about the emerging contours of ‘data practice’, touching on models of independent practice, engaging with government and business, poetry vs functionality and cross-cultural perspectives.

About the Speakers: 

Mitchell Whitelaw is an academic, writer and practitioner with interests in digital art, design and culture, especially generative systems, data-aesthetics, and digital cultural collections. His work has appeared in journals including Leonardo, Digital Creativity, Fibreculture, and Senses and Society. His current work spans materiality, data and culture, with a practical focus on creating “generous interfaces” for digital heritage. He has worked with institutions including the State Library of NSW, the National Archives, and the National Gallery of Australia, developing innovative interfaces to their digital collections. Mitchell is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Art and Design at the Australian National University.

Andrea Lau is a data visualisation designer and co-founder and director at Small Multiples. In her role, Andrea leads the user experience and delivery of projects for Small Multiples’ government, media and innovative ASX-listed clients. She is responsible for spearheading business development, providing data visualisation direction, and educating organisations on the value of communicating stories through data. Andrea brings over ten years’ experience in digital services having worked at the ABC, Interaction Consortium and MediaSmart. With a particular interest in educating others on the power of data visualisation, she has been an instructor at General Assembly, Masterclass Tutor at Guardian News and Tutor/Lecturer at the University of Sydney. 

Designing a Participatory Economy with Cameron Tonkinwise 

3.00 PM – 4.00 PM

Interaction Design has helped create platforms that appear to seamlessly match supply-and-demand. Marketed as liberatory, these platforms have become exploitative ‘gig economies.’ It is nevertheless possible to redirect these platforms to promote more local, fairer ways of cooperatively providing services. This talk explores some of the interaction design patterns that could help establish ‘platform cooperatives.’

About the Speaker: 

Cameron Tonkinwise is a Professor, School of Design at the University of Technology, Sydney. Prior to this, he was Director of Design Studies and Doctoral Studies at the Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Design. He has previously held the role of Associate Dean Sustainability at Parsons The New School for Design and was co-Chair of the Tishman Environment and Design Center at the New School in New York, United States of America. 

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Please Explain: Are We Our Gadgets?

SYDNEY. SATURDAY 29 June 2019. 

“If you can have a conversation with a simulated person presented by an AI program, can you tell how far you’ve let your sense of personhood degrade in order to make the illusion work for you?” Jaron Lanier, You are Not a Gadget (2010)

Responding to The Invisible Handan exhibition that considers how digital platform technologies are exploiting technological convenience to co-opt personal data in an uncertain zero-sum game, this edition of Please Explain will be moderated by Ariel Bogle, Technology Reporter for The ABC, and include panelists David Vaile, stream leader for the Allens Hub for Technology, Law & Innovation at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Faculty of Law, and Prof. Bronwen Morgan, Professor, School of Law, University of New South Wales (UNSW), alongside The Invisible Hand exhibiting artists Sunwoo Hoon and Mijoon Pak (Korea).

There is no area in life, business or society that has not been upended and rethought through platform technology companies. Nowhere is this more prevalent than the region of East Asia with the likes of Facebook and Google and their East Asian counterparts Naver, Tencent and Rakuten. It presents as no surprise that many people are anxious about our individual and collective futures and feel that as a society, we have little agency in how it is unfolding. Responding to 4A exhibition The Invisible Hand, this edition of Please Explain will focus on the writing of controversial computer philosophy writer, Jaron Lanier and his work ‘You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto‘ (2010), and our speakers will unpack the impact of platform technology companies in East Asia. The talk will explore the nature of platform technology companies, how these companies are destabilising the nature of democracy and governance, how data is being logged and co-opted by these companies and the possibilities for the future of our digital landscape.

Speakers: David Vaile, Bronwen Morgan, Sunwoo Hoon + Mijoon Pak
Moderator: Ariel Bogle 

Missed the event? Listen to the audio recording below:

Following Please Explain, 4A presents two deep dive discussions that highlight some of the most pressing issues facing users and consumers of technology and media in the Asia-Pacific. 

The Invisible Hand is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and has been supported by the Korean Cultural Centre and was assisted by The Freedman Foundation International Scholarship for Curators. The program is administered by the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA). 

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Byungjun Kwon: This Is Me

SYDNEY. Wednesday 26 June 6.00PM – 7:30PM 

Byungjun Kwon (권 병준), This Is Me (이것이 나다)

Coinciding with the exhibition opening of The Invisible Hand, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art presents Korean musician and performance artist Byungjun Kwon’s (권 병준) ‘This Is Me’. 

Beginning with a single whistle, Byungjun Kwon’s This Is Me is an experimental electroacoustic improvisational performance involving multiple layers of reverberated and looped sounds accompanied by an interactive video programmed projection. Sonically comprising of sounds made by the artist orally and simple percussive bells, the piece is an exercise in the electronic manipulation of live recorded sound. Kwon’s performance is created concurrently with a piece of video recording and face recognition software developed by Junghoon Ha. The artist is seated at a table while a camera scans his face and others drawn on paper throughout the performance while the software recognises these images as base data for face mapping. As the piece progresses, several famous faces of actors, politicians and artists are mapped to Kwon’s face via a projector, erasing the artist as if wearing a mask. In contrast to the self-assured title, This Is Me reflects on the inherent anonymity of our current digital era where our personal identity can be endlessly manipulated to erase all traditional conceptions of self. A study of an identity crisis in real time, the work is meditative in concept with the artist adopting famous visages all while toying with the automated software. Faces such as George Bush, Marilyn Monroe and Nam June Paik are twisted and contorted at Kwon’s whim all while creating a symbiotic relationship between the artist, the camera, the software and projector, underscored by transformed man-made sounds. 

This Is Me was first performed on 10 August 2013 at Talbot Rice Gallery, University of Edinburg for the 2013 Edinburgh International Festival and has since been performed at the Nam June Paik Art Centre, Gyeonggi, South Korea and Blockhaus DY10, Nantes, France (2015).

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Byungjun Kwon (b. 1971, Seoul, South Korea, lives and works in Seoul) is a musician and performance artist and pioneering figure of South Korea’s underground music scene. Beginning his career in the early 1990s as a singer/songwriter, Kwon released seven albums prior to relocating to Amsterdam, The Netherlands to study sonology and work for STEIM as a hardware engineer, a centre for the research and development of new electronic musical instruments. Since returning to Korea in 2011 he has expanded his practice into contemporary performance art, composing and performing experimental audio-visual works. His prior work in rock music, dance music, original film soundtracks, theatre scores and fashion runway soundtracking form an unconventional basis for his approach to creating and manipulating sound to form complex pieces. Recent projects include This Is Me, Edinburg International Festival 2013, Edinburgh, Scotland (2013); Artificial Garden, Mediacity Seoul 2012: Spell on You, Seoul, South Korea (2012); and My Instrument My Sound, Culture Station Seoul 284, Seoul, South Korea (2012), alongside several electronic instrument projects at various workshops.

This performance is presented in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, The Korean Cultural Centre, Australia and the Kim Kim Gallery, and sponsored by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism with support from the Korean Foundation for International Cultural Exchange (KOFICE) as part of the Traveling Korean Arts Project ‘Take ( ) at face value’.

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Minja Gu: Pasta Nowadays

SYDNEY. 4A CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART. Saturday 29 June 2019. 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

Minja Gu, Pasta Nowadays

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art presents Minja Gu’s (Korea) Pasta NowadaysMinja Gu’s works explore the cyclical forces of consumerism in society. Using durational performance, Gu facilitates contexts that transform everyday occurrences into ceremonies and rituals. In a performance lasting approximately two hours, Gu will use the ubiquitous act of making pasta as a relational act that encourages pause, reflection and communication among her participants. The noodles are made from diverse brands and flavors of flour from diverse origins and participants are welcome to wander in and out of the performance as they wish.

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Minja Gu (b. 1977, Daejeon, South Korea, lives and works in Seoul) is an artist working predominantly in performance and video exploring ideas related to universal objects of human experience such as labour, time and love. Her works often deconstruct everyday actions and occurrences into ceremonies and rituals, emphasising the irreversibility of time and the permanence of action. Gu’s key recent exhibition history includes works at Performance x 4A, Art Central, Hong Kong (2018); The Korea Artist Prize, National Museum of Modern And Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea (2018); Impakt Festival – FotoDok, Utrecht, The Netherlands (2016); And No Matter What the Phone Rings – The 6th Moscow Biennale, Moscow, Russia (2015); Our Hesitant Dialogues, Art Sonje Centre, Seoul, South Korea (2013); and the 08 Taipei Biennale, Taipei Fine Art Museum, Taiwan (2008). Gu received the award of excellence in the SongEun Art Award in 2010.

This performance is presented in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, West Space, The Korean Cultural Centre, Australia and the Kim Kim Gallery, and sponsored by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism with support from the Korean Foundation for International Cultural  Exchange (KOFICE) as part of the Traveling Korean Arts Project ‘Take ( ) at face value’.
 

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Rui Ho, Jale, Papaphilia x Mossy 333, Ham Laosethakul, RHunter

LIQUID ARCHITECTURE and 4A CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART present a night of splayed club influences via Chinese producer RUI HO. Known for her work on Shanghai label Genome 6.66 MBP and her genre-defying live performances, RUI HO makes her Melbourne debut alongside JALE’s fine mesh of synthetic textures and a new performance by PAPAPHILIA x MOSSY 333, HAM LAOSETHAKUL’s oscillating explorations and the data smearing AI of RHUNTER.
ABOUT THE ARTISTS: 

RUI HO: A genre-blending tour de force, Berlin-based non-binary Chinese producer and artist RUI HO makes electronic music that infuses modern club music with traditional Chinese sounds, described as “a loose narrative of ancient warfare and imaginary events”. 戰記 is RUI HO’s debut EP, and their second release on Genome 6.66 Mbp. From grimy drums to epic soaring trance, their sound combines the intensity of the club with sweet and refreshing melodies from their past and present.

JALE is a DJ and irrepressible energy-source. She has cemented her place in the Melbourne club scene, creating sets featuring new sounds from around the world intended to disrupt and reimagine the idea of contemporary club music. JALE trades strict loyalty to any sub-genre for a free-wheeling mix of moods and tempos that subverts overly-familiar clubbing soundscapes.

RHUNTER constructs huge spectralist panoramas, held together at the seams by precise percussion that flickers between creaky electroacoustics and punchy HD SFX. His treatment of sound material is like hearing the hallucinatory product from a noise removal algorithm pushed beyond its intended domain; something uncompromisingly sharp, rippling, ringing, totally embracing its own digitality. But this digitality is not a cold digitality, finding its counterpoint in various organic interventions ranging from liquid bass stabs to autotuned lamentations to the occasional oceanic drum kit adventure. This translates into variously-sized tension-release-structures, keeping the material constantly breathing and moving. Crisp samples and smeared tones lose and regain assumed form, the density of the discrete sound components always inviting new permutations.

HAM LAOSETHAKUL is a Thai born Melbourne based DJ. His exploratory sets – voyage through codes and data of sound where oscillations of noise pulses in and out of life – represent his personal experience from the confines of his worldly walls. He employs linear narrative to construct a visual palette of his escapades which he expresses through a sonic exploration: takes mind through a vastly hypnotic and romantically awkward journey, allowing curiosity to be understood through uninhibited and experiential means.

Together PAPAPHILIA x MOSSY 333 imagine the connectivity between music and the body through movement – exposing the shared quality of poetics.

MOSSY 333: is a multi-disciplinary artist focused on painting, music, and performance. Her stage work evokes insight to the subjectivity of her trans feminine experiences regarding body and movement, casting a critical gaze on heteronormative cis-gendered conditioning. Her performances demystify the often essentialised idea of a trans woman, to remind people that “trans women are women with autonomy and complexities”.

PAPAPHILIA aurally interrogates the aesthetics of political representation, exploring how sensorial disorientation informs collective belonging. She blends the poetics of exaltation and sorrow from 90s dance music, RnB, disco, pop and traditional pop standards, into an electronic palette drawn from the dystopian poetics of contemporary technological disposability. Slopped pop samples morph into the stoned rhythms of backwashed synths that ebb from the rhythmic flow of acid techno to deep house.

Curated by Mat Spisbah

Video by Benjamin Portas

Presented by Liquid Architecture and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Supported by City of Melbourne

Angel Music Bar is not a wheelchair-accessible venue

We acknowledge the Wurundjeri, Boonwurrung, Taungurong, Dja Dja Wurrung and the Wathaurung people of the Kulin Nation as the custodians of the land in which this event takes place, and we recognise that sovereignty was never ceded. We pay our respects to their Elders, past, present and becoming.

ANNOUNCEMENT// BROADWAY SYDNEY X 4A CREATIVE STUDIO

SYDNEY. 16 MAY 2019. 

ANNOUNCING// BROADWAY SYDNEY X 4A CREATIVE STUDIO

Get ready for an inspired, creative studio right on the footsteps of Broadway Sydney. 4A has teamed up with Broadway Sydney to create a space for emerging Sydney creatives with the BROADWAY SYDNEY X 4A CREATIVE STUDIO. This new creative space is designed to facilitate local artistry in the area that is set to be used by independent curators, arts writers, arts administrators, and practising artists. Get ready for an inspired, creative studio space right on the footsteps of Broadway Sydney. 

We’re thrilled to welcome independent curator Nanette Orly, arts writer and arts worker Soo Min-Shim, and emerging artist Naomi Segal as the first creatives to take up residence.

MEET THE CREATIVES//

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Nanette Orly
@nanettekorly
Nanette Orly is an independent curator based in Sydney. Her curatorial practice is deeply engaged with themes surrounding identity, development, cultural histories and offering alternative perceptions of contemporary society. Drawn to migratory aesthetics and research-based practices to form interdisciplinary group or collaborative exhibition concepts, Orly has curated exhibitions across a number of Sydney, regional and interstate galleries over the past five years. Recent curatorial projects include Transcendence (2018) at Firstdraft, Full Circle (2018) at The Lock-Up and 긴장 (that’s why I get so tired now) (2018) at Seventh Gallery in Melbourne. She is currently the Co-Director of artist run initiative Cold Cuts Project Space in Petersham and Board Member of the online publication Runway Australian Experiment Art. Orly has also been a successful participant in 4A Curators’ Intensive 2018 program in Sydney and was awarded the Project Curator of the Critical Animals Research Symposium 2018, based in Newcastle.

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Soo Min-Shim
@soominshim 

Soo-Min Shim is an arts writer and arts worker living on stolen Gadigal land. She received her Bachelor of Art History and Theory (First Class Honours) from the University of Sydney and is currently a Director at Firstdraft Gallery 2019-2020. She has written for several Australian and international publications including Art & The Public Sphere, ArtAsiaPacific, The Artling, Art + Australia, Art Almanac, Runway Conversations, un Extended, and Running Dog.

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Naomi Segal
@_naomisegal 

Naomi Segal is an emerging artist and curator engaging with contemporary Asian and diasporic art. She is drawn to cultural recovery, remembrance and love – specifically how the love of her Chinese family traverses linguistic and cultural
barriers. Peach Blossom Spring is her first curatorial project. Recent art awards include the Girl Genius Award (2018), Little Things Art Prize (2017) and Art Speaks Japanese (2016). She is mentored by Elizabeth Ann Macgregor OBE and has worked as an Assistant Program Coordinator for The Japan Foundation, Sydney. She has just curated a major exhibition, Peach Blossom Spring, at Firstdraft Gallery, Sydney.

The Broadway X 4A Creative Space can be found in Broadway Sydney on the corner of Parramatta & City Road and is officially open now.

Proudly supported by

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Congee Breakfast Tour: The Invisible Hand

SYDNEY. 20 JUL 2019, 11.00AM – 12.30PM

Join The Invisible Hand exhibiting artist Baden Pailthorpe and exhibition curator Micheal Do for a traditional Chinatown breakfast at a much-loved local eatery followed by a walkthrough of the exhibition and a discussion of some of the stories and ideas behind the artists’ works and the themes explored in The Invisible Hand.

The Invisible Hand considers how digital platform technologies are exploiting technological convenience to co-opt personal data in an uncertain zero-sum game. With work from Australia, New Zealand, Korea and Japan, this exhibition explores current and projected complications and contradictions in the digital realm that increasingly oscillate between technological evangelism and scepticism.

$25.00 +bf, includes breakfast. This program is included as part of our public programs for The Invisible Hand, book here 

Eugenia Lim: The Ambassador – Touring

NAUTILUS ARTS CENTRE, PORT LINCOLN, SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 19 APRIL – 1 JUNE 2019.

Venue: 66 Tasman Terrace, Port Lincoln, Eyre Peninsula, South Australia, 5606

The Ambassador presents three distinct series by Melbourne-based artist Eugenia Lim that centre upon a gold-suited figure who appears halfway between truth and fantasy. In each series, Lim transforms herself into her eponymous invented persona, the Ambassador, an insatiability curious character who traverses time and space, playfully exploring Australia’s cultural and built landscapes.

This exhibition marks the first exhibition of Eugenia Lim’s work and presents all three bodies of work together for the first time. Together, they represent a compelling and witty examination of contemporary Australia from a female, performative and Asian-Australian perspective. As the Ambassador, Lim ‘shapeshifts’ to unearth multiple dimensions of the Asian-Australian narrative – drilling down into racial politics, the social costs of manufacturing, and the role of architecture in shaping society – exploring how national identities and stereotypes cut, divide and bond our globalised world.

Curated by Mikala Tai, Director, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, The Ambassador is travelling to eight galleries and art centres across Australia between 2019 and 2021 through Museums & Galleries of NSW.

A 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Museums & Galleries of NSW touring exhibition. This project has been assisted by the Australian Government’s Visions of Australia program.

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Announcement // 4A Centre saddened by the loss of Chair, Edmund Capon, OBE, AM

March 18, 2019.

 

It is with great sadness that we note the loss of Edmund Capon OBE, AM, who has passed away in London.

Edmund Capon was a stalwart of Sydney’s art world and his passion, intelligence and sharp wit is remembered by all that had the opportunity to work with him and around him. Over the past four years Edmund has been the Chair of the 4A Board and has revitalised the organisation with his contagious energy and deep understanding of Australia’s relationship with Asia. During this period, he has reaffirmed the organisation’s commitment to fieldwork, research and scholarly pursuits while also demonstrating an unwavering commitment to artists and their artistic processes.

The Board and team at 4A are deeply saddened by the loss of our fearless leader but are most upset by the loss of our friend. Above all Edmund was a great supporter of us all in our work endeavours and our lives at home. On every occasion he made the workplace a fun and rigorously challenging place to be.

‘We are devastated to have lost Edmund, our endlessly inspiring colleague, who has done so much for Australia’s engagement and understanding of Asian art and culture. We are only just beginning to understand the extent of the wonderful legacy that he has left. I am also devastated to have lost such a great friend and mentor. Edmund will remain an important person to both 4A and myself for a very long time to come.’ – Mikala Tai, Director 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

 

‘Edmund’s vision, that of Australia’s proximity to Asia preceded well before the founding of 4A; we are so grateful as a board to have benefited from his deep knowledge and guidance over the years that he was chair. He shall be greatly missed.  The Board and wider 4A Family send their love to Joanna and the Capon family on their loss of such a great and loved man.’ – John Young, Board Member 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Messages of condolences can be sent to: hello@4a.com.au

Congee Breakfast Tour: By All Estimates

SYDNEY. 18 MAY 2019, 10.30AM – 12.30PM

Come aboard for a typical Chinatown breakfast at a much-loved local eatery with By All Estimates exhibiting artist Jessica Bradford and exhibition curator Pedro de Almeida, followed by a walk through of the exhibition and discussion of some of the stories and ideas behind the artists’ works.

Taking Singapore as a locus of multiple regional identities, By All Estimates brings together works by artists that give form to narratives obscured by the city-state’s rapid urban and social development and the coexistence of competing projections of cultural inheritance and recognition. Over the past decade especially, Singapore’s investment in cultural institutions has been seen as an attempt to position the nation as a beacon of cultural capital in Southeast Asia. Underpinning this expansion lies an ever evolving matrix of received and contested narratives that within certain contemporary public realms—from the streets of the city to the corridors of the museum—jostle, overlap or otherwise mingle in approximations of the influence of multiple ethnic representations and economic imperatives. This exhibition presents works by Kolkata-based artist Rathin Barman, Singapore-born Sydney-based artist Jessica Bradford, Singaporean London-based artist Erika Tan, and Singapore-based artist Moses Tan.

 

Jessica Bradford (b. 1987, Singapore) is a multidisciplinary artist based in Sydney. Her work explores her mixed race heritage by questioning stereotypical representations of cultural or national identity. She has held solo exhibitions at Firstdraft, MOP Projects and Galerie Pompom, and is a 2018 Parramatta Artists Studios resident. Bradford’s work has been included in curated group shows at Delmar Gallery (2017), Bathurst Regional Art Gallery (2015), Fairfield Museum & Gallery (2014) and Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest (2013). Bradford holds an MFA by Research from Sydney College of the Arts, and was a recipient of the Australian Postgraduate Award.  She has been a finalist in the John Fries Memorial Prize, the Tim Olsen Drawing Prize, and the Jenny Birt Award. Bradford is represented by Gallerie pompom, Sydney.

By All Estimates is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and supported by the British Council and Singapore Tourism Board.

4A X NGV ART BOOK FAIR

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is back again at the NGV’s Melbourne Art Book Fair. Join us to find a range of 4A supported and commissioned publications, artist prints, designs and fashion. Artists featured this year include: Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook, FX Harsono, Jason Wing, Shen Shaomin, Reko Rennie, Jason Phu, Chris Yee, and more.

4A is proud to be launching Eugenia Lim: The Ambassador at the Fair in conjunction with the national tour of Lim’s exhibition The Ambassador. Lim will be onsite and can personalise your copy of this limited print run. 

Since its launch in 2015, the annual Melbourne Art Book Fair has attracted more than 50,000 visitors annually, making it the most visited publishing event in the Asia-Pacific region.

The fifth Melbourne Art Book Fair in 2019 will see 4A join diverse emerging and established local and international publishers, artists and writers, across a four-day program of ideas, discussions and book launches at the National Gallery of Victoria. The 2019 program explores ideas around experimental and discursive publishing, challenging how we think about the publishing field.

Opening Night:

Thursday 15 March: 12:00pm – 5:00pm

Friday 16 March: 10am – 5pm and 6 – 9pm

Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 March: 10am – 5pm

Con-Yee HI MEDUSA! Exhibition Tour with dim sum and drinks

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Join artist Chris Yee and curator Con Gerakaris of 4A’s Lunar New Year exhibition HI MEDUSA! With a special Con-Yee Dumpling tour at The Chinese Garden of Friendship. Riffing off of 4A’s popular Congee Breakfast program, Chris and Con will give a guided tour of the exhibition throughout the gardens followed by an optional dim sum snacks and drinks at The Chinese Garden of Friendship’s new restaurant, The Gardens by Lotus.

Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA! is an exhibition that creates a tangible connection between the Chinese-Australian communities of Sydney and provides a unique opportunity for visitors to engage with the history of the Garden through neo-traditional artworks depicting modern and historical Lunar New Year cultural imagery.

Presenting twelve new and existing bespoke tapestries by emerging Sydney artist Chris Yee, visitors to the Chinese Garden of Friendship during Lunar New Year 2019 go on a journey through the Gardens, discovering detailed, beautiful and humorous images at every turn. Yee’s design work evokes the experiences and narratives of the Chinese diasporic communities of the city expressed through a graphic sensibility that echoes that architectural forms and decorative embellishments of the Chinese Garden of Friendship. Hand woven, the tapestries in this special exhibition, presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, compliment the natural flow of the venue, synthesising a harmonious environment of traditional and contemporary artistic expression.

Chris Yee (b. 1989, Sydney) is an East Ryde (Sydney) based artist, illustrator and designer who specialises in traditional “pen and paper” methodologies. Chris’ main influences stem and vary from 90’s post-apocalyptic manga, rap and punk aesthet- ics. Through his imagery he constructs narratives ranging from the humorous to the monstrous and macabre. Chris’ solo exhibitions include Mad Love, 2015, Japan Foundation, Sydney; Panorama, 2015, Kind Of- Gallery, Sydney; and has par- ticipated in group and collaborative exhibitions including No Más (with Andrew Yee), 2018, Wedge Gallery, Sydney; SOFT, 2016, Superchief Gallery, Los Angeles; and Goliath Ballroom (with James Jirat Patradoon), 2015, Goodspace, Sydney. Out- side his art practice, Chris is a designer who has produced work for some of Australia’s best-known brands, including VIVID Festival Sydney, Sony Australia, Samsung – Opera House, Vans, Red Bull and Gelato Messina.

2-3 PM EXHIBITION TOUR ONLY: $5.00 +BF
2-4 PM EXHIBITION TOUR + AFTERNOON TEA AT LOTUS: $25.00 +BF

BOOK HERE

Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA! has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁: 语嘿

SYDNEY. 19 JANUARY – 24 MARCH 2019.

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿 is the first retrospective of leading contemporary Chinese artist Xiao Lu. The exhibition is anchored by Xiao Lu’s performance work Dialogue from the landmark China/Avant-Garde exhibition at the National Art Gallery, Beijing, in February 1989. This work, in which the artist fires a gun at her own art installation, is a milestone in the development of contemporary art in China. It has also has been read as a critical turning point in China’s recent history. While Dialogue remains an iconic work of that era, it is also one of the most misunderstood pieces of contemporary Chinese art. Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿  examines Xiao Lu’s creative interest in deep emotion, extreme action, and chance. Spanning a period of 30 years, the exhibition presents significant performance works by Xiao Lu including a new commission that explores the artist’s ongoing connection to Australia.

Xiao Lu (born 1962, Hangzhou) works with performance and installation. She is a graduate of the Subsidiary School of the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing and Zhejiang Academy of Fine Arts (China Academy of Art), Hangzhou. Her graduation work Dialogue was included in the China/Avant-Garde exhibition in Beijing in 1989 and became famous after she fired a gun at it, which led to her temporary arrest and an extended period of residence in Sydney. Xiao Lu’s fictional memoir Dialogue《对话》, published in Chinese and English in 2010, exposed powerful forces affecting women artists in contemporary China. Xiao Lu’s work has been included in important international exhibitions, most recently Performer and Participant, Tate, London (2018) and Art and China After 1989: Theatre of the World, Guggenheim Museum, New York (2017), and been collected by public and private institutions including the Tate, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Taikang Insurance Group Art Collection, Beijing; and White Rabbit Collection, Sydney. Xiao Lu lives and works in Beijing and Australia.

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue is produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This exhibition and associated programming are supported by the Australian Government through the Australia-China Council of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship project led by Dr Claire Roberts Reconfiguring the World: China. Art. Agency. 1900s to Now (FT140100743), and the Faculty of Arts, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne.

肖鲁:语嘿 是中国当代著名艺术家肖鲁的首次回顾展。展览从肖鲁1989年2月在北京中国美术馆内举办的,具有里程碑意义的中国现代艺术展上的装置行为作品《对话》——艺术家对着自己的装置开枪开始。这件作品在中国当代艺术发展中具有重要意义,被普遍认为是中国现代历史转折的文化信号,但它也成为当代中国艺术中最容易被误解的作品之一。 “肖鲁:语嘿”展示了艺术家对深层情感、极端行动和不同语境的创造发挥,同时也显示艺术家作品的鲜明特质。展览的作品跨越肖鲁30年艺术发展过程,包括一个全新的与悉尼相关的作品。通过这次回顾展,让观众探讨艺术家与澳大利亚的持续关系。

肖鲁(1962年生于杭州)从事行为表演和装置艺术。她毕业于北京的中央美术学院附属中学和杭州的浙江美术学院(中国美术学院)。她的毕业作品《对话》在1989年北京的中国现代艺术展览中展出,她在开枪后被临时拘捕,之后长期居住在悉尼。肖鲁的自传体小说《对话》中英版于2010年出版发行,此书揭露了影响当代中国女性艺术家的一股强大力量。肖鲁的作品已被选入重要的国际展览,近期包括:“表演者与参与者”,泰特,伦敦(2018年)和”1989年之后的艺术与中国:世界剧场”,纽约古根海姆博物馆(2017年)。其作品被公共和私人机构收藏,包括:伦敦泰特美术馆;纽约现代艺术博物馆;北京泰康保险集团艺术收藏;以及悉尼白兔收藏。肖鲁在北京和澳大利亚生活和工作。

“肖鲁:语嘿”由4A当代亚洲艺术中心制作和展出。本次展览及相关教育项目得到了澳大利亚政府,澳中理事会的支持、以及罗清奇博士主持的澳大利亚研究理事会(ARC)前程研究项目《重设世界:中国、艺术与动力 1900年至今》(FT140100743)和墨尔本大学文化与传播学院艺术系的支持。

Exhibition Documentation

All images: Kai Wasikowski

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Tables: China/Avant-Garde exhibition archival materials. Back: Xiao Lu, Dialogue (对话
), 1989, C-type print on vinyl, documentation of installation, and performance: 11.10am,
5 February 1989, China/Avant-Garde exhibition, National Art Gallery, Beijing. Reproduced courtesy Wen Pulin Archive of Chinese Avant-Garde Art and Xiao Lu. Projection: China/Avant-Garde exhibition, set of 210 archival 35mm colour transparency slides produced by Fine Arts Magazine, 1991. Private collection. Far Left: Wang Youshen, China/Avant-Garde exhibition. Before and after the ‘Shooting Incident’ (detail), 1989 – 2019, inkjet prints, dimensions variable, courtesy Wang Youshen. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu, Dialogue (对话
), 1989, single channel video, 2:04 minutes, documentation of installation and performance: 11.10 am, 5 February 1989, China/Avant-Garde exhibition National Art Gallery, Beijing. Reproduced courtesy Wen Pulin Archive of Chinese Avant-Garde Art and Xiao Lu. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Tables: China/Avant-Garde exhibition archival materials. Back: Wang Youshen, China/Avant-Garde exhibition. Before and after the ‘Shooting Incident’ (detail), 1989 – 2019, inkjet prints, dimensions variable, courtesy Wang Youshen. Bottom Right: China/Avant-Garde exhibition, set of 210 archival 35mm colour transparency slides produced by Fine Arts Magazine, 1991. Private collection. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. China/Avant-Garde exhibition archival materials. Image: Kai Wasikowski

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Left: Xiao Lu, Tides (絅蟙) (detail), documentation of performance, Sydney, 18 January 2019, installation: sand, bamboo poles. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist. Right: Xiao Lu, Sperm (精子), 2006, C-type print, 120 x 160cm, edition 6/10, printed 2016, documentation of performance: 21-23 May 2006, Long March Project – Yan’an, Kangda Hotel, Yan’an. Courtesy Long March Space and the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Xiao Lu, 15 Gunshots… From 1989 to 2003, (15枪…从1989 到 2003), 2003, 15 black and white digital prints, framed and then punctured by a bullet,
100 x 45 cm, printed 2018, edition 12/15,
photographs by Li Songsong. Courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Left: Xiao Lu, Polar (极地) (detail), 2016,
C-type prints, 80 x 120 cm, editions 1/9 and 5/9, printed 2018, documentation of performance: 23 October 2016, Beijing Live 1, Danish Cultural Center, 798 Arts District, Beijing, China. Photographs by Yi Zhilei. Courtesy the artist. Right: Xiao Lu,
Polar (极地),
2016,
single channel video, 4:43 minutes,
documentation of performance: 23 October 2016, Beijing Live 1, Danish Cultural Center, 798, Beijing, China. Filmed by Zhang Zhiqiang and Li Kai, edited by Zhang Li and Xiao Lu. Courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿 , detail installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Left: Xiao Lu, Tides (絅蟙) (detail), documentation of performance, Sydney, 18 January 2019, installation: sand, bamboo poles. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist. Centre: Xiao Lu,
One (合), 2015,
single channel video, 3:10 minutes,
documentation of performance: 5 September 2015, Live Action 10, Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Filmed by Zhang Zhiqiang, edited by Xiao Lu. Courtesy the artist. Right: Xiao Lu, One, (合一) (detail), 2015,
C-type print, 120 x 80 cm, edition 6/10, printed 2017, documentation of performance: 5 September 2015, Live Action 10, Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Photographs by Lin Qijian. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

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Xiao Lu, Tides (弄潮), 18 January 2019, Sydney, sand and, bamboo, inkjet print on silk. Photograph by Jacquie Manning. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

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Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA!

CHINESE GARDEN OF FRIENDSHIP, SYDNEY. 2 FEBRUARY – 17 FEBRUARY 2019.

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Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA! is an exhibition that creates a tangible connection between the Chinese-Australian communities of Sydney and provides a unique opportunity for visitors to engage with the history of the Garden through neo-traditional artworks depicting modern and historical Lunar New Year cultural imagery.

Presenting twelve new and existing bespoke tapestries by emerging Sydney artist Chris Yee, visitors to the Chinese Garden of Friendship during Lunar New Year 2019 go on a journey through the Gardens, discovering detailed, beautiful and humorous images at every turn. Yee’s design work evokes the experiences and narratives of the Chinese diasporic communities of the city expressed through a graphic sensibility that echoes that architectural forms and decorative embellishments of the Chinese Garden of Friendship. Hand woven, the tapestries in this special exhibition, presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, compliment the natural flow of the venue, synthesising a harmonious environment of traditional and contemporary artistic expression.

Chris Yee (b. 1989, Sydney) is an East Ryde (Sydney) based artist, illustrator and designer who specialises in traditional “pen and paper” methodologies. Chris’ main influences stem and vary from 90’s post-apocalyptic manga, rap and punk aesthet- ics. Through his imagery he constructs narratives ranging from the humorous to the monstrous and macabre. Chris’ solo exhibitions include Mad Love, 2015, Japan Foundation, Sydney; Panorama, 2015, Kind Of- Gallery, Sydney; and has par- ticipated in group and collaborative exhibitions including No Más (with Andrew Yee), 2018, Wedge Gallery, Sydney; SOFT, 2016, Superchief Gallery, Los Angeles; and Goliath Ballroom (with James Jirat Patradoon), 2015, Goodspace, Sydney. Out- side his art practice, Chris is a designer who has produced work for some of Australia’s best-known brands, including VIVID Festival Sydney, Sony Australia, Samsung – Opera House, Vans, Red Bull and Gelato Messina.

Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA! has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.

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Documentation:

All images by Chris Yee.

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L-R: Chris Yee, TEAM, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship; 4 CORNERS, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, MIRRORBALL, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 175 x 160cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, SYDNEY WORLD TOUR, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, UNITED NATIONS, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, EYES (CLASSIC), 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 152.4 x 63.5cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, BOSS BABY, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, MAINLAND, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 152.4 x 127cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, STOCK XCHANGE, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, BOY MEETS WORLD, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 152.4 x 127cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, PEACE PLACE, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, TWINS EFFECT, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.

Choi Jeong-Hwa: Love Me, Pig

DARLING HARBOUR PRECINCT, SYDNEY. 2 FEBRUARY – 18 FEBRUARY 2019.

To celebrate Lunar New Year 2019 in the Darling Harbour precinct, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) is creating a special installation to mark the festival. Leading international artist Choi Jeong-Hwa has collaborated with 4A to present a continuation of his Happy Happy Project with his world-renowned inflatable flying pink pig Love Me, Pig visiting Sydney for the first time. Two editions of Love Me, Pig have been adapted for display as part of the Lunar New Year Festival in Sydney and will be the centre point of celebrations in Darling Harbour, with one positioned outside the Chinese Garden of Friendship, and one outside the ICC.

Choi Jeong-Hwa has always been inspired by everyday objects where he builds oversized sculptures from moulded plastics and inflatables. His work is characterised by its ability to speak to audiences with Mr Choi seeking to make art not for museums or galleries but for everyone. In Sydney new editions of Love Me, Pig have been created to celebrate the Lunar New Year of the Pig and playfully celebrates the pig as an East Asian symbol for wealth, fortune and luck.

On the first weekend of the festival from Saturday 2 February, watch the pigs come to life for their first inflation and see live water painting from calligraphy expert, Master Dongyang, as he creates an engaging public performance, painting wishes for Sydney in the coming year – a special moment that will activate these spaces. Audiences will be invited to water paint their own wishes for the new year on the grounds around Love Me, Pig.

After the painting event to coincide with the opening of the Lunar New Year festival, Love Me, Pig will remain on display until February 18, throughout the New Year celebrations.

Choi Jeong-Hwa (b. 1961 Seoul, South Korea) is an artist and designer whose work moves between the disciplines of visual art, graphic design, industrial design and architecture. Inspired by the harmony and chaos of the urban environment, Choi undermines the hierarchy of the museum by installing his pieces on the outside of buildings.

His playful practice comments on the privileged environment of art institutions and questions the prized status of artworks amidst a consumer-frenzied world. He is well known for large scale surreal installations from found objects. He constructed a 10-storey building installation made from 1,000 discarded doors, and decorated Seoul’s Olympic Stadium with garlands made from 2 million pieces of trash, transforming the building’s surface into glittering, jeweled structure. In his other pieces, he explores ideas of artificiality and permanence through the use of plastic, food, and flowers.

Choi participated in many Art festivals and exhibitions. He was the Korean representative in “Secret Beyond the Door”(2005), at Venice Biennale, Italy. Most recently he participated in the Bangkok Art Biennale (2018), The Asia Pacific Triennial (2015) at QAGOMA and has held a solo exhibition Choi Jeong Hwa: Happy Together (2016) at the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki. He declines to categorize his work, leaving the audience to define his pieces at a personal level, as his motto states: “My art is your heart”.

In Conversation, Xiao Lu

BRISBANE. 24 JAN 2019. 6.00PM – 8.00PM.

4A is pleased to present an in conversation with leading contemporary Chinese artist Xiao Lu, on the occasion of her first retrospective, Impossible Dialogue, at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, at The Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane.  Xiao Lu will be in dialogue with two of the exhibition’s co-curators  Claire Roberts and Xu Hong to view and discuss videos of some of the artist’s recent performance works.

The conversation will focus on Xiao Lu’s ongoing creative interest in deep emotion, extreme action and chance, and connect with broader themes including art and gender, feminism, activism and the writing of art histories.

Presented by the School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney and the exhibition Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, in association with The IMA, Brisbane.


 Acknowledgements:

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue is produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This exhibition and associated programming are supported by the Australian Government through the Australia-China Council of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship project led by Dr Claire Roberts Reconfiguring the World: China. Art. Agency. 1900s to Now(FT140100743), and the Faculty of Arts, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne.

Header Image: Xiao Lu, One, performance, 5 September 2015, Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Photograph by Lin Qijian, courtesy Xiao Lu.

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NIGHTVISION IV, The Long

29 May- 21 June 

Window Video Projections screening

Sunset – Sunrise

Thursday, Friday and Saturday

Artists: Luke Butterworth, Brad Hammond, Cecelia Huynh, Samantha Rath, Paula Wong.

Nightvision IV is a program of short silent video works showcasing the talents of young and emerging national and international artists projected on to the Asia-Australia centre ground-floor window. Curated by Aaron Seeto, Nightvision screens sunset to sunrise every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings.

JIA (FAMILY, HOUSE, HOME)

19 September – 18 October 2003

 

Artists: Lindy Lee, Greg Leong, William Yang

Jia (Family, House, Home) is a group exhibition presented with the Carnivale Multicultural Arts Festival. To be opened by Mr King Fong OAM.

The exhibition toured internationally with an opening held at the Hong Kong Fringe Club on 4 February 2004. Included speeches by Douglas Gautier (Executive Director, HK Arts Festival), the officiating guests John Phibeam, Deputy Consul-General of Australian Consulate General Hong Kong, and Benny Chia, Director of Fringe Club, and participating artists Lindy Lee and William Yang respectively. A video of the opening can be found on Asian Art Archive.

OPEN LETTER

10 March – 14 May 2005

Phase Two Exhibition Launch

Thursday 14 April 6.00-8.00PM

Artists: Dadang Christanto, Emil Goh, George Poonkhin Khut + John Tonkin, Selina Ou, Vienna Parreno + Krysztof Osinski, Melissa Ramos, Koky Saly, Phaptawan Suwannakudt, My Le Thi, Suzann Victor

Open Letter is a touring exhibition celebrating the 30th anniversary of Australia’s dialogue partnership with ASEAN.

 

 

PROCESS

October – 20 November 2004

Exhibition Launch

Thursday 21 October 6.00-9.00PM

Artists: Emil Goh, Guan Wei, My Le Thi

Process is a group exhibition presenting the works of Emil Goh, Guan Wei and My Le Thi. To be opened by Councillor Phillip Black, City of Sydney at the Asia-Australia Arts Centre.

Artist Talks

Friday 22 October 2.00PM

Workshop 

Saturday 23 October 2pm

The artists Guan Wei  and My Le Thi will be conducting workshops and public interactive projects during this exhibition.

 

 

 

4A x Sahtein Lebanese Feasts Cooking Class

SYDNEY. THURS NOV 29, 6.00 – 8.30PM

On Thursday November 29, join artist Justine Youssef and her mother Siham Chamoun for a special one-off cooking class. Siham is the amazing brains behind Sahtein Lebanese Feasts, an Instagram account which documents traditional Arabic recipes and intimate familial stories related to her village in Lebanon. She provided our wonderful mezze platters at Justine’s 4A opening, as well as the breakfast spread at the Manoosheh Breakfast Tour.

From 6PM, join us at 4A to learn how to make Warak Enab – delicious, rice-stuffed grape leaves – and join your classmates, Justine and her mum for a light dinner.

Places for this special workshop are strictly limited to 10 participants and tickets are $60, inclusive of all cooking materials, instructions, light dinner and drinks.

This program is presented as part of 4A’s current exhibition, Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses.

Please Explain: Why is My Curriculum White? Panel Discussion

SYD. 22 NOV – 6.30-8.00PM

Please Explain: Why is My Curriculum White? Panel Discussion
Thursday 22 November 2018
6.30PM–8.00PM

Moderator: Justine Youssef
Speakers: Alissar Chidiac , Dr Jason De Santolo , Jennine Khalik, Dr Omid Tofighian
4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. In response to the Why Is My Curriculum White campaign this edition of Please Explain considers Omid Tofighian’s article in The Conversation that challenges our education system to rethink and reframe Eurocentric norms that currently provide the foundations from which to learn. Joining him are Sydney based community workers and artists who base their practices in diversifying ideas of ‘the norm’ and seek to tell complex, diverse and sometimes paradoxical stories of who we are today. This conversation is led by Justine Youssef, who has curated this panel as part of her 4A exhibition, Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses.

Missed the event? Listen to the audio recording below:

Speaker Profiles:

 | Moderator: Justine YOUSSEF

| Justine YOUSSEF is currently living on the unceded territory of the Darug peoples. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art from the National Art School, Sydney, Australia and is currently working from the Parramatta Artist Studios. She has been awarded the New South Wales Artists’ Grant (NAVA and Create NSW), as well as a studio residency at Blacktown Arts. She has held collaborative solo exhibitions at Seventh Gallery, Melbourne, and Firstdraft, Woolloomooloo with Duha Ali in 2018, and has participated in group exhibitions at Airspace Projects, Marrickville; Bankstown Art Center, Bankstown; Sullivan+Strumpf, Zetland; and Collab Gallery, Chippendale. Her work can be found in the collections of the National Association for the Visual Arts; the National Art School Drawing Archive; and the Sydney Gallery School.

 | Alissar CHIDIAC

| Alissar Chidiac has been working in different contexts of community and cultural engagement for almost 40 years. Since 1991 her focus has been on Arab Australian cultures, through contemporary cultural production, cultural heritage and performance work. She worked at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney (1998-2004) where she initiated a diversity of critical projects, innovative exhibitions and Arab community partnerships through the ‘wattan project’. She creatively developed model programs with Auburn Community Development Network, including ‘Inside Out_Muslim Women Exploring Identities and Creative Expressions’ (2005-2007) and ‘Moving Calligraphy_Visual Storytelling’ (2009-2010) bringing together artists of Arabic and Chinese calligraphies and local Aboriginal artists. In 2011-2012 she was Creative Producer of Casula Powerhouse Art Centre’s national initiative ‘No Added Sugar: Engagement and Self-Determination: Australian Muslim Women Artists’. Alissar worked as Creative Producer with ‘Auburn Cartographies of Diversity’ (2015-2017) activating community engagement and producing local exhibitions in Auburn. She has also been contracted by Fairfield City Council in 2017-2018 to facilitate professional development and mentorship programs with emerging artists and community members. Alissar and Maissa Alameddine are currently Artist Coordinators with Arab Theatre Studio Creative Hub in Granville, supported by Cumberland Council, through Create NSW’s ‘Making Spaces’ program. Alissar initiated Arab Theatre Studio in 2014, after a Space Residency with Urban Theatre Projects in 2013. In 2005 Alissar was awarded a two-year Fellowship by the Community Cultural Development Board of the Australia Council for the Arts. In 2010 she won the annual ‘Ros Bower Award’, honouring a lifetime contribution to community arts and cultural development. 

| Dr Omid TOFIGHIAN

| Dr Omid Tofighian is a lecturer, researcher and community advocate, combining philosophy with interests in rhetoric, religion, popular culture, transnationalism, displacement and discrimination. He completed his PhD in Philosophy at Leiden University, the Netherlands, and graduated with a combined honours degree in Philosophy and Studies in Religion at the University of Sydney. Omid has lived variously in the UAE where he taught at Abu Dhabi University; Belgium where he was a visiting scholar at K.U. Leuven; the Netherlands for his PhD; and intermittent periods in Iran for research. His current roles include Honorary Research Associate for the Department of Philosophy at the University of Sydney; faculty at Iran Academia; and campaign manager for Why Is My Curriculum White? – Australasia.’ He contributes to community arts and cultural projects and works with asylum seekers, refugees and young people from Western Sydney. He has published numerous book chapters and journal articles and is author of Myth and Philosophy in Platonic Dialogues (Palgrave 2016) and translator of Manus by Behrouz Boochani (Picador 2017).

Jennine KHALIK

| Jennine Khalik is a Sydney-based journalist and digital producer at the ABC. She was formerly a reporter with the national broadsheet The Australian, in news and art, and with NewsLocal.

Jason DE SANTOLO

| Dr Jason De Santolo (Garrwa and Barunggam) is a researcher, creative producer & father committed to forging a sustainable world for future generations through transformative research strategies, storytelling & practices of renewal. Born in Larrakia homelands – Darwin, he moved to Aoteaoroa/NZ at an early age, and studied treaty & international environmental law. His unique research practice integrates video, creative practice & renewal strategies through a Garrwa driven decolonising research paradigm. In 2014 he received a UTS Research Excellence Scholarship and graduated in 2018 with a creative doctorate that explores the renewal of song traditions through his passion for filmmaking & collective aspirations for self determination.

Artists’ Christmas Car Boot Sale

SYDNEY. 6 DEC 2018, 5.00 – 9.00PM

The Artists’ Christmas Car Boot Sale is curated by Sydney-based artist Garry Trinh. Descend to the lower levels of World Square to encounter established and emerging artists. Step into cars transformed into mini galleries and fossick in boots for one-off original art just in time for Christmas. Think driver-seat seances, artworks delivered straight from the studio and intimate car boot performances.

Featuring DJ Coris, refreshments and a pop-up Gift Wrapping service with all proceeds being donated to Wesley Mission to tackle homelessness in Sydney, this will be a Christmas Market like no other!

Featured cartist boots include:

The Car Boot Sale will take place on Thursday 6 December, 2018 on Level 5 of World Square Shopping Centre (644 George St, Sydney NSW 2000).


 

garry-trihn

Garry Trinh (born Sydney,  Australia and lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is an artist working in photography, video, painting and works on paper. He holds a BA in Psychology and a BA in Visual Communications / Photography and Digital Imaging from the University of Western Sydney.

Trinh was the winner of the Sydney Life photography prize in 2007 and won the Auburn Mayoral Photographic Prize in 2009 and 2010. His photo book Just Heaps Surprised to be Alive was nominated for Photography Book of the Year at the 4th International Photo book Festival at Kassel, Germany. From 2017-2018 Trinh was a full time tenant at Parramatta Artists Studios. His work is collected by the Art Gallery of NSW and Artbank. He has been exhibited at the Australian Centre for Photography, Campbelltown Arts Centre, Blacktown Arts Centre, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, Stills Gallery, Gallery 4A and many others.

Trinh makes art about the uncanny, unexpected and spontaneous moments in daily life and to express his personal ideas. He is perplexed by the perception of artists as coffee-drinking loafers who work whenever they feel like it. He doesn’t even drink coffee. His works are about a way of looking at the world, to reveal magic in the mundane. He is never bored and never late.

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Exhibition Opening: Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses

SYD. THURSDAY 1 NOV – 6.00-8.00PM

 

Edmund Capon AM, OBE, Chair of the Board of 4A, and
Mikala Tai, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
invite you to join us at the opening of:

Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses
Exhibition opening: 6-8PM, Thursday 1 November
To be officially opened by artist Lindy Lee.


You are invited to join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Thursday, 1 November as we open the exhibition Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses.

All Blessings, All Curses presents recent and newly commissioned works by Sydney-based artist, Justine Youssef. Born in the heart of Western Sydney, Youssef’s practice explores the stifling white heat of global xenophobia with deeply personal and universal ruminations that layer the smell, sights and textures of her ancestral homeland, Lebanon.

This opening event starts at 6:00PM with drinks and an opening address.

Click to RSVP to this special event by Friday 19 October.

Exhibition runs 2 November – 16 December 2018.
Curated by Mikala Tai. Curatorial Assistant Tian Zhang.


#AllBlessingsAllCurses @4a_Aus
www.4a.com.au


Image above: Duha Ali and Justine Youssef, 2018, Kohl (still), single channel video, 4:18; courtesy the artists.

Manoosheh Breakfast Tour

SYD. SATURDAY 3 NOV – from 10.30AM

Join artist Justine Youssef and curator Mikala Tai for a tour of All Blessings, All Curses followed by a Sobhiyeh – Lebanese Breakfast – in the gallery. Hear from the artist about the process of developing this series of works over a traditional Lebanese breakfast of za’atar manoosheh, labneh and olives.
$25 (+bf) includes breakfast. Book here.

Family Workshop: Garden Worlds with Kai Wasikowski

SYDNEY, 8, 9, 11 OCTOBER

Join Sydney-based artist Kai Wasikowski to make your own garden image and turn it into a beautiful ‘sun-print’ photograph, inspired by the Chinese Garden of Friendship. Drop into the gardens between 11-1pm on Mon 8, Tue 9, or Thu 11 October to learn how to use materials to make a botanical scene.

Have fun developing your “gardening” skills, arrange your own garden scene using plants, then create a take-home ‘nature’ photograph using the sun, whilst exploring the plants, colours and textures of the Garden of Friendship.
With professional photographer and artist Kai, you’ll make a blue and white print, ready to frame display at home! Whether you stay for 15 minutes or the full two hours this fun workshop will help you create a botanical print and learn basic photographic principles.
For participants aged between 5-12 years, accompanied by a responsible adult. All materials provided, drop in session, no bookings required. Garden Worlds is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Kai Wasikowski and the Chinese Garden of Friendship for the October 2018 school holidays program.

Moon Lantern Workshops with Louise Zhang

As part of World Square’s Moon Festival 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art has commissioned a special family workshop for visitors to make their own lantern to celebrate the festival. Learn how to decorate and create a candy-coloured take-home lantern with Sydney-based artist Louise Zhang. All workshops are free, with a drop-in capacity for 20 participants. Each workshop finishes with a Moon Festival Parade.

Chapter One: Thinking through it

PEACOCK GALLERY, AUBURN. 15 September – 21 October 2018.

Opening: Saturday 15 September 2018, 1:30 – 3:30pm.

As part of the 2018 Curators’ Intensive presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art two emerging curators have been selected to curate an exhibition at Peacock Gallery.

Chapter One: Thinking through it is a project curated by Sabrina Baker that exists as a reading room, research space and open studio. Artists have contributed things that influence their working methods and you’re invited to dive into their practice through the stacks of books taken from bedside tables and studio desks, the photographs, knick knacks and stuff that feeds into the development of their work.

Hannah Donnelly, Thea Jones, Shivanjani Lal, Nikki Lam, Anja Loughhead, Stephen Pham, and Jason Phu work with different materials and methods to craft works that explore place in relation to the self.

Each of the artists explore themes of personal identity and myth making with a grounding in being both inside and outside of their local environments – where they are now and where they have been before.

Tongues (curated by Isabel Rouch) // Peacock Gallery – 4A Curators’ Intensive Exhibition 1

PEACOCK GALLERY, AUBURN. 15 September – 21 October 2018.

Opening: Saturday 15 September 2018, 1:30 – 3:30pm.

As part of the 2018 Curators’ Intensive presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art two emerging curators have been selected to curate an exhibition at Peacock Gallery.

Tongues (curated by Isabel Rouch) is the first offering in an ongoing curatorial project, exploring the varied effects language can have on us as individuals.

The exhibition questions how our experience of the world and self changes with language, and what can be lost or gained through translation.

Tongues brings together the personal perspectives of multidisciplinary, Sydney based artists, Yeliz Yorulmaz, Kai Wasikowski and Eugene Choi; each sharing the experience of being multilingual or growing up in a multilingual context.

All three respond to the theme of identity through language, reflecting particularly on how their exposure to linguistic diversity has influenced them, and in addition, how their art practice fits into this layered understanding and correspondence.

Hungry Ghost Festival: The Burrangong Affray

SYDNEY. SATURDAY 11 AUGUST 2018

On the final weekend of The Burrangong Affray and to mark the month of the Hungry Ghost Festival, join artist Jason Phu in collaboration with Eugene Choi for a special lion dance performance.

There will also be an opportunity to contribute to the offerings to be made when the artists next visit the township of Young.

For more information about The Burrangong Affray click here.


Artist Biographies: 

Eugene Choi (b. 1993, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Sydney) is a performance-based artist whose practice has evolved around the physicality of constructing internal and external structures working across sculpture, performance, installation, video and text. Often influenced by the body in movement, Choi’s practice travels between controlled and uncontrolled states by engaging herself in unfamiliar, yet composed situations, relying on the live response of her physical and emotional body. A self-made system of geometry becomes integral between objects, bodies and space, attempting to achieve equilibrium.

Jason Phu (b.1989, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Sydney) studied at COFA, Sydney graduating with honours in 2011 and NSCAD, Nova Scotia. He works across a range of mediums from installation, painting and sculpture where he traces the connections between the tradition of Chinese brush and ink painting and contemporary practice. His work has been informed by several China based residencies at CAFA, Beijing; DAC Studios, Chongqing; and Organhaus, Chongqing which has enabled him to further investigate the tradition of calligraphy. Recently Jason has had numerous solo exhibitions in Australia including Westspace, Melbourne; Nicholas Projects, Melbourne; CCAS Gorman Arts Centre, Canberra; and ALASKA PROJECTS, Sydney. He won the coveted Sulman Prize in 2015 and in the same year received a Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship which allowed him to develop his practice between China and Australia.

 

PERFORMANCE DOCUMENTATION: 

hungry_ghost_01 hungry_ghost_03 hungry_ghost_09 hungry_ghost_13 hungry_ghost_16 hungry_ghost_27 hungry_ghost_30 hungry_ghost_48

All images: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Header image: Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.

 

 

Please Explain: ‘Census, Map, Museum’

SYDNEY. SATURDAY 1 SEPTEMBER 2018

| Moderator: Pedro DE ALMEIDA

| Speakers: Rushdi ANWAR; Alana HUNT; Associate Professor Phillip GEORGE; Djon MUNDINE, OAM; Sarker PROTICK

| 4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. Responding to Temporary Certainty presented at 4A this edition of Please Explain seeks to examine ideas and issues around nationalisms, sovereignty and memorialisation.

Join artists Rushdi Anwar, Alana Hunt and Sarker Protick alongside speakers Associate Professor Philip George and Djon Mundine OAM who will take a key premise articulated by political scientist and historian Benedict Anderson in his seminal text Imagined Communities (1983) as a jumping off point for a broad discussion.

Reading Recommendations:

 

Speaker Profiles:

| Pedro DE ALMEIDA 

| Pedro is Program Manager at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and exhibition curator, Temporary Certainty.

| Rushdi ANWAR 

| Rushdi Anwar (b. Halabja, Kurdistan) is a Melbourne-based artist, currently working between Australia and Thailand. His installation, sculpture, painting, photo-painting and video work often reflect on socio-political issues relating to Kurdistan, Iraq and the Middle East. He explores these issues through an investigation of form, utilising a material vocabulary and different processes of making. Anwar was educated in Kurdistan and Australia, studying at the Institute of Kirkuk- Kurdistan and Enmore Design Centre/Sydney Institute. He holds a Master of Fine Art (2010) and a PhD in Fine Art (2016) from RMIT University, Melbourne. He has held solo and group exhibitions widely in Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Kurdistan, Norway, Switzerland, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and USA. Recent and upcoming exhibitions include 12th Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2018), and the 13th Havana Biennial, Cuba (2019). Anwar’s works are held in the collections of the Australian War Memorial, the Kurdistan Regional Government, and in private collections. He has curated exhibitions in Kurdistan (2010), Thailand (2012, 2015), and Australia (2013). Following several artist-in-residence programs in Thailand, he co-founded and co-coordinated the Australian Thai Artist Interchange, Melbourne (2012–2016), an organisation founded to enhance cross-cultural exchange, awareness and appreciation of art and culture between Thais and Australians. Rushdi is a founding member, with Brook Andrew and Shiraz Bayjoo, of the artist collective The Working Collection.

| Alana HUNT 

| Alana Hunt (b. 1984, Sydney) makes contemporary art, writes and produces culture through a variety of media across public, gallery and online spaces. She lives on Miriwoong country in the north-west of Australia and has a long-standing engagement with South Asia. The politics of nation making and the colonial past and present of Australia and South Asia are central to her practice. Since 2009, she has orchestrated participatory art and publishing projects that have activated different media forms in the public sphere to shed light on Kashmir. Paper txt msgs from Kashmir (2009–2011) prompted media in India and Pakistan to speak about a state-wide mobile phone ban they had previously been silent on. This work won the Fauvette Laureiro Artist Scholarship. In 2016, the seven-year participatory memorial Cups of nun chaicirculated as a newspaper serial in Kashmir, reaching thousands of people on a weekly basis during a period of civilian uprising and state oppression. This work won the 2017 Incinerator Art Award. Her essay, A mere drop in the sea of what is, published by 4A Papers (Issue 1, November 2016), explored the art circulating on the ‘streets of social media’ in Kashmir and made it into the Hansard Report of the Australian Parliament. In 2018, Alana undertook a residency in Sulawesi with Rumata Art Space & the Makassar International Writers’ Festival and will present Cups of nun chai at Tufts University Art Gallery, Massachusetts, and a series of artists presentations at Tufts, Brown, and Parsons universities. Her work is held in both public and private collections including Artbank and the Macquarie Group Collection.

| Associate Professor Phillip GEORGE  

| UNSW’s Associate Professor Phillip George’s practice operates across zones of cultural difference, exploring and making connections between the complexities that exist between East and West. His work draws connections between Australian beach culture and the fractured, turbulent zones of the Middle East. George has exhibited widely over the past thirty years with exhibitions throughout Australia, Europe, America and Asia. In 2008 George produced his seminal exhibition, Borderlands at the Casula Powerhouse in Sydney, NSW. His work is in private and public collections in Australia and internationally.

| Speaker: Djon MUNDINE OAM  

| Djon Mundine OAM, member of the Bandjalung people of northern New South Wales, is a curator, writer, artist and activist. He has held prominent curatorial positions in many national and international institutions, including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and Queensland Art Gallery. Between 1979 and 1995 he was the Art Advisor at Milingimbi and Ramingining in the Northern Territory. He was the concept artist of the Aboriginal Memorial at the National Gallery of Australia in 1988. In 1993 he received the Medal of the Order of Australia for service to the promotion and development of Aboriginal arts, crafts and culture. In 2005-2006 he was Research Professor at The National Museum of Ethnology (Minpaku) in Osaka, Japan. He is currently an independent curator of contemporary Indigenous art.

| Speaker: Sarker PROTICK

| Sarker Protick (b. 1986, Bangladesh) is a Dhaka-based artist whose work explores the possibilities of time, light and sound. His portraits, landscapes and photographic series engage philosophically with the specificities of personal and national histories. Sarker’s approach across various mediums incorporates detailed observations and subtle gestures as a means of creating personal spaces, often minimal and atmospheric. He was named in British Journal of Photography’s annual ‘Ones to Watch’ and Photo District News’ (PDN) 30 emerging photographers of the year. Sarker is the recipient of Joop Swart Masterclass, World Press Photo award, and Australian Photobook of the Year grand prize. His body of work Exodus was awarded the Magnum Foundation Grant 2018. Sarker’s work has been shown in museums, galleries and photo festivals internationally, including Art Dubai; Paris Photo; Singapore Art Week; Dhaka Art Summit; Chobi Mela International Photography Festival, Dhaka; Latvian Contemporary Museum of Photography, Riga; and Noorderlicht International Photofestival, Netherlands. Sarker is a faculty member at Pathshala South Asian Media Institute, Dhaka, and currently represented by East Wing Gallery, Dubai.

Asian-Australian Art Now: Positioning the Field(s)

Saturday 27 – Sunday 28 September, 2008

Organised by the Australian Centre for Asian Art & Archaeology, University of Sydney and Gallery 4A, Sydney with the financial support of the ARC Asia-Pacific Futures Research Network, the School of Letters, Art and Media of the University of Sydney, and Gallery 4A.

This workshop will provide a forum for statement and debates by artists, art theorists, art administrators and curators on what constitutes Asian-Australian art. We will debate whether this kind of hyphenated naming and categorisation has value, and if so what kind? Should cultural identification, in current condition of national and global art, be deferred as simply a situation of reference of art practice, where of the artist of the theorising and exhibiting agencies? There is an increasing body of work by Australian artists whose stating point is their own family links to different Asian cultures, and there are artists without such a background who increasingly work directly in Asian countries or with Asian references. These positions have resulted in a complex web of Asian and Australian encounters.


The workshop will be organised in four sessions with the confirmed speakers listed below:

Saturday 27 September

Morning: Art Practice: Asian-Australian Artists
Speakers include: Ah Xian, Gennady Liu, Yuji Sone, Suzann Victor, John Young

Afternoon: Art Theory
Speakers include: Charles Green and Lyndell Brown, Cuong Le, Francis Maravillas, Djon Mundine, Nicholas Tsoutas

Sundau 28 September

Morning: Art Practice: Australian Asian Artists
Speakers include: Vernon Ah-Kee, Prapon Kumjim, Rodney Glick, Lindy Lee, Jamil Yamani

Afternoon: Exhibition
Speakers include: Alison Carrol, Christine Clark, Rachel Kend, Kim Machan

Belinda Lai and Alice Wesley-Smith: To Have and To Hold

Wednesday 24 May, 2006

Fashion and art collide in a one-night only collaboration between designer Belinda Lai and photographer Alice Wesley-Smith, to be held at the Asia Australia Arts Centre (Gallery 4A).

The unique fashion pieces on display are originally sourced from clothing from the 1900s through to the 1970s:

“The concept is to reinstate the gentle tradition of keeping clothing as heirlooms, similar to other forms of jewellery and adornment. Clothes are no longer just ‘rags of the ragtrade,’ but keepsakes that can be treasured from generation to generation.” – Belinda Lai

The photography draws upon the extensive experiences of Wesley-Smith throughout Europe and, in particular, Asia where she constantly draws inspiration. The interaction of these displaced communities within the social context of Australia is of particular interest in her photographic work.


Belinda Lai was the winner of the Mercedes-Benz Startup Young Fashion Designer of 2004.

Alice Wesley-Smith is currently working on a solo exhibition of  her recent experiences in East Timor.

Exhibition Opening: Temporary Certainty

SYDNEY. 6-8PM, THURSDAY 30 AUGUST. 

You are invited to join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Thursday 30 August as we open major group exhibition Temporary Certainty.

Rushdi Anwar 
Alana Hunt 
Sarker Protick 

Taking in geographies shaped by sudden shifts of historical change wrought by complex interventions and their subsequent social impact in the greater Asia region, Temporary Certainty presents works by artists that are indelibly marked by their emergence within conditions of uneasy reconciliation. With a focus on Bengal, Kurdistan and the Kimberley region of Western Australia, this exhibition explores how artists approach the question of reconfiguring regional cultural adaptation in contemporary forms that embody the consequences of broader geopolitical expediencies.

Grappling with tensions between certainty and doubt, permanence and all that is ephemeral, Temporary Certainty contemplates the value of what can be apprehended—much less held onto—with any guarantee in a present age lurching towards ever greater polarisations.

 

 

Temporary Certainty is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Rushdi Anwar’s commissioned work has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body. The presentation of Sarker Protick’s Exodus has been supported by The Esplanade, Singapore, with additional support from the Australian Centre for Photography.

Exhibition opening: The Burrangong Affray

THURSDAY 28 JUNE. SYDNEY.

You are invited to join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Thursday, 28 June, as we open major exhibition The Burrangong Affray.

Between November 1860 and September 1861 the New South Wales goldfields of Burrangong, near the present day township of Young, were the site of Australia’s largest racially motivated riot. Rising antagonism over gold mining access and cultural habits saw trivial misunderstandings intensify into racial tensions that erupted into violence across the goldfields. Over ten months, Chinese miners were subjected to threats, robbery and sustained acts of violence. This anti-Chinese sentiment swept through the goldfields of Victoria in the 1850s and by the early 1860s reached a flashpoint in New South Wales, provoking public discussion and debate. In Sydney, the NSW Parliament responded to the contention by passing legislation to restrict Chinese immigration and began, alongside Victoria and South Australia, to write the prelude to the White Australia Policy.

For The Burrangong Affray, through a series of residencies in Young and surrounding historical sites over the past 18 months, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art has commissioned Chinese-Australian artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge trace the events and repercussions of this period of civil disobedience. Supported by historian Dr Karen Schamberger, the artists’ research-led practice interweaves these accounts of history to create contemporary mediations that reflects upon the forces of identity, economics, race and otherness in Australia today.

This exhibition is the second iteration of a four-part exhibition project. The first was realised in Young in April. 2018.


This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Please Explain: The Burrangong Affray

SYDNEY. 30 JUNE.

12-2PM

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

181-187 Hay St, Haymarket, Sydney.

4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. Responding to The Burrangong Affray presented at 4A this edition of Please Explain seeks to examine the lasting effects of this somewhat overlooked incident in Australia’s history. Join artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge, along with historian Dr Karen Schamberger and writer and journalist Gabrielle Chan as they discuss the histories and the resonances in the current day of the Burrangong Affray and associated events.

Missed the event? Listen to the audio recording below:

BOOK LAUNCH: Imagining Taiwan: The Role of Art in Taiwan’s Quest for Identity by Sophie McIntyre

SYDNEY // Monday July 2 // 12.30 – 1.30

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is delighted to host the launch of Dr Sophie McIntyre’s new book Imagining Taiwan: The Role of Art in Taiwan’s Quest for Identity.

Taiwan’s quest for identity and international recognition has been the most important and fiercely contested issue for nearly half century, both nationally and internationally. Imagining Taiwan is the first in-depth and comprehensive study, published in English, which critically explores the pivotal role played by the visual arts in Taiwan’s identity discourse. Drawing on 25 years of research, Sophie McIntyre analyses the ways in which identity narratives have been imagined, interpreted and transmitted, locally and globally, through the production, selection, display and reception of Taiwan art. This book focuses on the post-martial law era, a transformative period when democratisation gave rise to a heightened sense of Taiwanese consciousness, and a growing awareness of Taiwan’s place in the world. Artists, curators, art critics and scholars in Taiwan actively engaged in identity issues in unique, and often subversive ways. The author reveals how, with the turn of the new millennium, identity discourses in the visual arts shifted, from a Taiwan-centred narrative into a transnational vision embracing local, regional and global perspectives. Imagining Taiwan brings together primary and archival sources, and nearly 200 images, many published for the first time. It is an essential reference for specialists and students in art, curatorship, museums, and Taiwan and China studies, and it will also appeal to those seeking a greater understanding of the wider region.

Sophie McIntyre is a scholar and curator of art from the Asia-Pacific, with expertise in art from Greater China. She received her PhD from the Australian National University (2013) and has lectured and held fellowships in universities in Australia, Taiwan, China and Hong Kong. She has also curated more than 30 exhibitions, several of which featured art from Taiwan. Her texts have been widely published in books, journals, and catalogues in Australia and internationally

The 4A Set

Twenty years ago 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art was founded by a group of young professionals and artists who banded together to raise money, create work and produce a space that celebrated the connection of Australia to the Asia-Pacific region. With $7,000 raised by these early patrons 4A secured its first space in Sydney’s Chinatown and began to research, document, develop, discuss and present contemporary visual art from our shared region. Today our work is internationally recognised and we are Australia’s leading visual arts organisation working within the Asia-Pacific.

The 4A Set is a new community of art lovers who are passionate about creating cultural understanding between Australia and Asia. Not your regular patrons program, the 4A Set is for friends, mates, lovers, colleagues. Whatever the size of your social set, 4A will connect you and your group with the latest in Asian-Australian contemporary art and voices through a series of dinners, parties and networking opportunities year round – while providing vital support for 4A and Asian and Australian artists.

If you are interested in joining the 4A Set and finding out more, get in touch with 4A Development Manager, Bridie Moran – bridie.moran@4a.com.au

 

4A Symposium: This Is How We Do It

MELBOURNE // 3 AUGUST 2018

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and the University of Melbourne invite you to join us for 4A’s 2018 symposium, This Is How We Do It: Museums and Galleries in Asia.

This Is How We Do It: Museums and Galleries in Asia brings together leading professionals from museums and galleries across wider Asia to share experiences and discuss what’s next for our region’s cultural and creative spaces. With international experts including Philip Tinari (China), director of Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing; Joselina Cruz (Philippines), director of the Museum of Contemporary Art & Design (MCAD), Manila; and Reem Fadda, independent curator (Palestine); alongside local speakers representing community, state and national institutions and organisations, this symposium seeks to generate debate and discussion around the central question of how Australia’s arts ecology can learn from and embrace new models and practices from our Asian neighbours.

A day-long symposium, this event is free to attend but RSVPs are required due to limited seating capacity and catering which will be included for all registered attendees.  Click here to register.

To download the day’s program, complete with bios, click here.

____________________________________________________________________

Symposium schedule:

9.00AM– 10.00AM                             Registration 

10.00AM – 10.15AM                           Welcome

Prof. Su BAKER AM (Australia), Pro Vice-Chancellor Engagement and Director, Centre of Visual Arts (COVA), Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne

Dr Mikala TAI (Australia), Director, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

10.15AM – 10.30AM                           Opening presentation

| Prof. Charles GREEN (Australia), Professor of Contemporary Art, School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne

Charles Green frames the day’s discussions by providing a brief contextual overview of Australia’s varied engagements and relationships with Asia within changing global contemporary art contexts.

10.30AM – 11.15AM                           Focus presentation

| Reem FADDA (Palestine), independent curator based in Ramallah, Palestine.

In August 2017, the Palestinian Museum in Ramallah opened its inaugural exhibition, Jerusalem Lives (Tahya Al Quds). Through her curatorial direction, Reem Fadda examined the city of Jerusalem as a case study that aimed to metaphorically represent globalisation and its failures and expose the challenges imposed by militarisation and occupation that Jerusalem and its people are facing. Combining a multifaceted approach that included commissioned site-specific artworks in the grounds and gardens of the Museum, alongside a program that supported civic institutions in the city that have adopted an enduring methodology of collective struggle, Reem discusses the processes by which a new museum in an old city engaged more than just art and artists in a process of mutual knowledge production as a frontier of resistance.

11.15AM – 12.30PM                           Panel 1 – Old spaces, new stories: the future of responsive institutions

| Speakers: Dr Rebecca COATES (Australia), Director, Shepparton Art Museum; Reem FADDA (Palestine); Dr Anthea GUNN (Australia), Senior Curator of Art, Australian War Memorial; Kirsten PAISLEY (Australia), Deputy Director, National Gallery of Australia.

| Moderator: Dr Mikala TAI

How do museums and galleries that have long held a central responsibility to maintain and build upon collections ensure that their priorities are responsive to changing local and global contexts? Whether it be the question of the decision-making processes behind the acquisition of artworks, the question of programming and wider cultural engagement with audiences, or the role of advocacy and education, established institutions in today’s climate are unavoidably charged with expectations of reflecting, responding and developing new curatorial strategies, new content, new audiences and new experiences. Bringing together leading gallery directors and curators with extensive experience in tackling these expectations, this panel will focus on the essential imperative of established institutions to maintain relevance.

12.30PM – 1.30PM                             Lunch break

1.30PM – 2.15PM                               Focus presentation

Joselina CRUZ (Philippines), Director, Museum of Contemporary Art & Design (MCAD), Manila

Joselina Cruz’s curatorial projects over the past decade have been defined by her commitment to developing spaces and platforms, particularly in Southeast Asia and the Philippines more specifically, a region whose cultural infrastructure has rapidly evolved while also growing its own cultural projections and methods of engagement with local and international audiences. Central to her concerns as a curator and a cultural leader is the responsibility of prompting conversations about the intertwined structures of power and influence, in art as well as politics, alongside providing opportunities for artists’ voices and platforms for cultural self-determination. Joselina will explore these subjects through a discussion on recent projects including Pacita Abad: A Million Things to Say (2018) and Apichatpong Weerasethakul: The Serenity of Madness for MCAD (2017), and The Spectre of Comparison, the Philippines Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017), that presented artists Lani Maestro and Manuel Ocampo in an exploration of the ‘double-consciousness’ of colonial experiences and legacies.

Presentation supported by Artspace, Sydney.

2.15PM – 3.30PM                               Panel 2 – Expanded and expansive: curatorial approaches that push the boundaries of the institution

| Speakers: Joselina CRUZ (Philippines); Reuben KEEHAN (Australia), Curator Asian Art, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA); Natalie KING (Australia), independent curator and Enterprise Professor, Victorian College of Arts; Dr Sophie McINTYRE (Australia), independent curator and Lecturer, Faculty of Creative Industries, Queensland University of Technology.

| Moderator: Dr. Olivier KRISCHER (Australia), Deputy Director, China Studies Centre, University of Sydney.

Institutions, by their inherent organisational nature, have a marked tendency to institutionalise the production of knowledge. This can, and often does, have the unintended effect of creating barriers for engagement and participation by the communities they purport to serve and reflect. Often criticised as ‘gate-keepers’, whether deserving and substantiated or not, an increasing number of museums and galleries have responded to this perception by introducing independent voices within their curatorial programs. Offering insights based on the diverse and extensive experiences and accomplishments of working in Asia, the panelists will address the challenges at play when institutions seek to break down boundaries between artists, communities and cultures more broadly, as well as identify successful examples of collaboration and representation within expanded modes of cultural engagement.

4.00PM – 4.50PM                               In conversation

| Speakers: Philip TINARI and Lisa HAVILAH (Australia), Director, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia.

Join one the world’s leading experts in contemporary Chinese art as Phil Tinari sits down with Lisa Havilah for a conversation that will encompass such topics as the exponential growth of international engagement with Chinese art and culture; the effect of rising art market value of contemporary Chinese art upon the emergence of a new generation of artists; the fear of censorship and questions of artistic and institutional independence; and China’s strategic investment in soft power through cultural infrastructure and its promotion.

Session co-presented with Melbourne Art Week. 

4.45 PM – 5.00PM                              Questions from the audience and concluding remarks

Speaker: Dr Mikala TAI

 

This Is How We Do It: Museums and Galleries in Asia is co-presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and The University of Melbourne. Additional support thanks to our partners at Artspace Sydney, and Melbourne Art Week. 

Keynote: Philip Tinari

MELBOURNE // 31 JULY 2018

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is pleased to partner with Melbourne Art Fair and University of Melbourne, with support from Federation Square, to present Philip Tinari as the keynote speaker at Melbourne Art Fair.

Prior to joining UCCA, Tinari launched LEAP, an internationally distributed, bilingual magazine of contemporary art published by the Modern Media Group, in 2009. He is a contributing editor of Artforum, and was founding editor of that magazine’s Chinese edition in 2007. Widely regarded as an authority on China’s contemporary art scene, he was co-curator, with Alexandra Munroe and Hou Hanru, of the 2017 exhibition “Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World” at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York.

For more information on 4A’s symposium and extended talks program, please see: http://www.4a.com.au/thisishowwedoit/

Congee Breakfast Tour with artist Jason Phu

SYDNEY // 15 JULY 2018

Join artist Jason Phu in a special artist led tour of The Burrangong Affray and the Haymarket area. The exhibition tour includes a visit to a nearby Buddhist Craft and Joss Stick store, where Jason will unpack the significance of this craft as it relates to exhibition, followed by a traditional Taiwanese congee breakfast.

Please wear comfortable walking shoes. Spaces limited (15pax).

Workshop: Wild stories: the heroes and villain in our gardens

SYDNEY // JULY 2018

A 4A workshop at the Chinese Garden of Friendship with Diego Bonetto

This hands-on learning experience led by food adventurer Diego Bonetto invites children to go on adventure through the Garden’s plants and stories, Explore the gardens and learn about the history of these special plants before creating a crafty story using vegetables and plants. This workshop is presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with the Chinese Garden of Friendship for the July 2018 school holidays program.

For participants aged between 5-10 years, accompanied by a responsible adult. All materials provided.

Wild stories: the heroes and villains in our gardens is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership Diego Bonetto and the Chinese Garden of Friendship for the July 2018 school holidays program.

Artist Biography:

Diego Bonetto is a wild food advocate based in Sydney, most famous for his offering of urban foraging workshops. Building on the knowledge acquired while growing up on a farm in Italy, Diego introduces people to the ever-present food and medicine plants that surround us. He collaborates extensively with chefs, herbalists, environmentalists and cultural workers promoting new understanding of what the environment has to offer. He works to enable convivial conversations around belonging, sustainability and agency. In other words he offers an alternative for people to re-engage with their neighbourhoods, streets and footpaths through edible adventures.

Workshop: Tracing Shadows: Paper Cutting Workshop with Tianli Zu 

SYDNEY // JULY 2018

A 4A workshop at the Chinese Garden of Friendship

The Chinese Garden of Friendship is filled with shadows. Children are invited to join leading Chinese-Australian artist Tianli Zu to try their hand at the traditional Chinese art of paper cutting. Whether you spend ten minutes or an hour with her you will be able to create a work that mimics the shadows of the gardens.

For participants aged between 5-10 years, accompanied by a responsible adult. All materials provided, drop in session, no bookings required.

Tracing Shadows: Paper Cutting Workshop is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Tianli Zu and the Chinese Garden of Friendship for the July 2018 school holidays program.

 

Workshop: Sketching Skills 101

SYDNEY // JULY 2018

A 4A workshop at the Chinese Garden of Friendship with Kristone Capistrano

The Chinese Garden of Friendship is filled with flowers, trees and hidden animals. Join Sydney-based artist Kristone Capistrano and try to capture them on paper. Drop into the gardens between 11-1pm to learn the basics of sketching with a leading local artist. Have fun developing your observational drawing skills whilst exploring a variety of drawing techniques, including cross-hatching, stippling and positive/negative space. You will also have the chance to draw one of your sketches onto a glossy ceramic tile, ready to display at home! Whether you stay for 15 minutes or the full two hours Kristone will help you sketch your favourite part of the garden to take home

For participants aged between 5-10 years, accompanied by a responsible adult. All materials provided, drop in session, no bookings required.

Sketching Skills 101 is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Kristone Capistrano and the Chinese Garden of Friendship for the July 2018 school holidays program.

 

Artist Biography:

Kristone Capistrano is a Philippine-born Sydney based emerging artist working in contemporary drawing and portraiture. In 2017 whilst still completing his Honours year in Fine Arts, Kristone was awarded the first prize for the Royal South Australian Portrait Biennale, Commended prize for the Lloyd Rees Youth Award, and both the Local Artist and People’s Choice awards for the Blacktown Art Prize. Kristone has participated in multiple group exhibitions in Australia including exhibitions held at the Blacktown Arts Centre, Campbelltown Arts Centre and Muswellbrook Regional Art Gallery. He is currently preparing for his forthcoming solo exhibitions at Crowther Contemporary in Melbourne and Tong Lau Space in Hong Kong. His works are included in the Blacktown City Art Collection, as well as in numerous private collections in Sydney, Perth, Adelaide and Manila. Kristone is also a qualified English and Visual Arts teacher with extensive experience in teaching both Primary and Secondary education.

Chris Doyle: The Space of a Kiss

2 – 24 August, 2002

Chris Doyle: The Space of a Kiss is an official event of Sydney Asia Pacific Film Festival and presents a series of photo-collages at Gallery 4a [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art].


Christopher Doyle (b. 1952) is an Australian-Hong Kong cinematographer who has worked on high profile films such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and extensively in Hong Kong with director Wong KariWai on Chungking ExpressFallen Angels and In The Mood for Love. He has won awards at Cannes Film Festival, Venice Film Festival, an AFI Award for cinematography, four Golden Horse awards and six Hong Kong Film Awards.

SNACKCHAT: Bankstown Poetry Slam

SYDNEY // Thursday May 17 2018 // 6.30-8.00PM (Bar opens from 6pm)

Bankstown Poetry Slam, recognised widely as the largest regular poetry slam in Australia, brings to 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art a BPS style slam in the heart of Sydney. As one of the final programs in the SNACKCHAT series presented for the Biennale of Sydney join us for a snacks, drinks and slam. With 5 randomly chosen members of the audience judging the performances, the poets will have the stage and 3 minutes to win the crowd over with their clever wordsmithery. The evening will also feature a guest poet, stay tuned for details.

RSVP now.

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SNACKCHAT is a new series of events by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, creating conversations about Sydney’s diverse cultural fabric over shared snacks from different community groups.

Please Explain: Australia’s fear of multilingualism

SYDNEY // Thursday 7 June 2018 // 6-8PM
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. Responding to Akira Tayakama’s Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project presented at 4A as part of the Biennale of Sydney this edition of Please Explain is curated by Dr Elly Kent.
Australia seems to be quite happily multicultural but very comfortable being mono-lingual. Despite being a country of hundreds of languages our education system remains steadfastly focused on cursary study of languages that is not interwoven throughout primary and tertiary education. As a result we remain a nation that fails to celebrate our cultures through language and we fail to prepare our next generations to be global citizens. Where do we go from here?
Join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for a robust debate.
Speakers: poet/writer Lorna Munro;  Kevin Ngo, poet and Bankstown Poetry Slam organiser; Jane Stratton of LOST IN BOOKS, and linguist Asefeh Zeinalabedini.
Moderator: Dr Elly Kent
Want to bone up on the conversation before the night? Please see our recommended reading here.
Missed the event? Listen to the audio recording below:

*Image courtesy of the Biennale of Sydney. Document Photography.

15th Biennale of Sydney: Zones of Contact

8 June – 27 August 2006

Exhibiting artists at Gallery 4A at the Asia-Australia Arts Centre [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art]: Stella Brennan (NZL), Chen Chieh-jen (TWN) and Kai Syng Tan (SGP)

Expansive in both curatorial ambition and footprint, Zones of Contact expanded beyond its principal, inner-city venues to other sites, including art centres in south-west Sydney suburbs of Blacktown and Campbelltown, in a desire to reach broader audiences. The scale of the undertaking was equalled by Merewether’s inclusive research process, which included visits to many countries in the two years prior to the 2006 Biennale.

Thematically, the exhibition dealt broadly with events, ideas and concerns that shape our lives, as well as our sense of past and future. It explored zones in which people live and move: cities and settlements, the merging and separation of public areas and private territories, and places where people encounter one another. In an attempt to map the world through its artists, Merewether gathered work about landscape and territory, notions of home and homeland, and the impact of cross-cultural encounter.

Sub-themes of colonialism, experiences of war and conflict, displacement, migration and mobility in the exhibition played out against experiences of living in an increasingly cosmopolitan, globalised world.


Stella Brennan (b. 1974, Auckland, New Zealand) is an Auckland-based artist, writer and curator. She has a Masters degree in Fine Arts from Auckland University. In 2003 she was the Waikato University’s inaugural Digital Artist in Residence. She is also the founder of Aotearoa Digital Arts, New Zealand’s only discussion list dedicated to New Media Art.

Chen Chieh-Jen (b. 1960, Taoyuan, Taiwan) is a Taipei-based artist and filmmaker.

Tan Kai Syng (b. 1975, Singapore) is a performance and installation artist. Her video recordings of folk recalling events highlight the difference in histories, suggesting a questioning of historical truth. Challenging hegemonic narrative structures in oral histories, Syng attempts to reconstruct history through collective subjective memory.

Professional Development Information Night: Beijing Studio Program and 4A Curators’ Intensive

Sydney // Monday 30 April 2018 // 6.00-7.00PM
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Join our Program Information Night to meet with 4A staff to learn more about the 4A Beijing Studio Program, and/or 4A Curators’ Intensive. The evening will consist of a short presentation on what to expect from each program and information about the application process. Staff will be happy to answer any questions you may have.

RSVP now.

If you’re not based in Sydney or can’t make it to the session, join in on Facebook Live from 6PM AEST here.


About the opportunities:

The 4A Curators’ Intensive is an initiative developed by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art to encourage professional advancement amongst early career Australian cultural practitioners with an interest in curatorial practice. In 2018, the Curators’ Intensive, will take place in Melbourne between Tuesday 31 July – Saturday 4 August.

Now in its seventh consecutive year, the 4A Beijing Studio Program is a unique initiative that sees three Australian artists embark on a month-long residency in September at the studios of internationally renowned Chinese-Australian artist Shen Shaomin. This experience provides a unique opportunity for artists to be mentored by a leading international artist, undertake research for new works, develop professional networks and witness first-hand the changes occurring in one of the world’s most vibrant capitals. The program covers airfares, accommodation, daily meals, travel insurance and a small stipend.

For more information on our professional development opportunities.

Paula Wong: Take

23 November – 15 December, 2001

Take is a collection of new video works by Paula Wong produced during her recent studies at Goldsmiths College, on a Samstag Scholarship. The ambiguous imagery in these silent video pieces destabilise the viewer by challenging their sense of the familiar, questioning the processes of vision and cognition.

Paula Wong is a based in Melbourne. She was included in the Moet & Chandon travelling exhibition in 1999 and has exhibited widely throughout Australia, at RMIT University Galleries; the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the National Gallery of Australia.

Aaron Seeto: The one thousand other things

23 November – 15 December, 2001

The one thousand other things is an exhibition by Aaron Seeto, which explores the blurring of plots from B-grade Kung Fu films and stories retold through the family photo album. Using food, specifically 1000-year-old eggs and salt preserved duck eggs, relished Chinese delicacies; Seeto creates photographs using and old salt photographic process. On these eggs, texts from Kung Fu films are interspersed with pictures of distant relatives, plotlines of murder, intrigue and honour, popular Hong Kong cinema and Australian urban domestic environments converge.

Aaron Seeto is an emerging Sydney-based artist. He has been included in exhibitions at Wollongong City Gallery; Casula Powerhouse; Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and he is a participant in the Weather Report Project in The Hague, The Netherlands.

Xiao Xian Liu: From My Other Lives to the Present

21 September – 20 October, 2001

Xiao Xian Liu’s exhibition examines history and race in the context of his Chinese background. Games and The Way We Eat are new works that draw on the difference between what is native and what is introduced to Australia. Playing on famous Australian icons, the artist creates a humourous view of of our sense of identity. In My Other Lives traditional stereographs are incorporated with the artist’s face. This process alters the identity in the picture and contrasts the European with the Asian face.

Xiao Xian Liu is a Chinese artist based in Sydney. He has shown at the National Gallery of Australia and The Moet & Chandon Exhibition Passing Time at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

Michael Bullock: Rubber Fish (Con Cá Cao Su)

21 September – 20 October, 2001

Rubber Fish (Con Cá Con Su) is an exhibition by Michael Bullock which was made during an artist residency in Hanoi, Vietnam. It features a school of fish made from recycled car, bicycle and truck inner tubes, inflated and suspended in mid-air. The work was inspired by the contrast of social conditions in Vietnam. The fish is also a potent symbol in Vietnamese culture, portraying luck and fertility.

Dong Wang Fan: Descendants

20 April – 19 May, 2001

Descendants is an exhibition by Dong Wang Fan that examines cultural identity and spatial ambiguity. The five paintings in Descendants feature computer-generated objects to represent a kind of futuristic creature with mechanical parts.

Dong Wang Fan is a Chinese-born artist currently living in Sydney. He has held many exhibitions since migrating to Australia including at the Drill Hall Gallery; Australian National University; Wollongong City Gallery; Hazelhurst Regional Gallery; Campbelltown City Art Gallery and Ray Hughes Gallery, Sydney.

Nelia Justo: My Pleasure is Your Tea

21 April – 19 May, 2001

My Pleasure is Your Tea is a series of works by Nelia Justo which explores the relationship between Eastern and Western cultures through an examination of historical trade ties between Europe and Asia in the 15th – 19th Centuries. By incorporating aspects of refined goods with mass produced electronic parts, Justo explores the cultural, sociological and economical repercussions created in trade between two cultural identities.

Nelia Justo is a French-born emerging artist based in Sydney. She has shown at numerous galleries throughout Australia, including the 13th Tamworth Fibre Textile Biennial; Jam Factory, Adelaide; the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane as well as overseas.

Tim Silver: Untitled (viole(n)t crumble)

22 June – 14 July, 2001

untitled (viole(n)t crumble) is an exhibition of new work by Tim Silver of chocolate moulded Action Man figures. Using the stickiness of sugar as a raw material of commodification, Silver examines the relationship between art and commerce.

Tim Silver is an emerging Sydney-based artist who has exhibited in artist-run spaces in Sydney and Melbourne.

Greg Leong: Singing History Quilts For New Chinese Australians

22 June – 14 July, 2001

Singing History Quilts For New Chinese Australians is an exhibition by Greg Leong which explores the celebrations of the Centenary of Federation through textiles and karaoke. In this series, richly decorated quilts sing Australiana classics that have been translated into Cantonese. These intricately designed quilts combine iconic Australian paintings with references to traditional Chinese textiles to explore an alternative perspective on the recent celebrations.

Greg Leong is a Tasmania-based artist who has exhibited at Tamworth Regional Gallery, Object Gallery, as well as internationally In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Dani Marti: You Make Me Feel Like Love, Peace and Happiness

15 March – 14 April, 2001

You Make Me Feel Like Love, Peace and Happiness is an exhibition of new works by Dani Marti.

Linda is a teaser and a seducer. Linda is the personification of Marti’s work of highly textural weave. Representing psycho-sexual tension, strands criss-cross to reveal sensual curves that are at the same time stretched taut along the plane. Like magnified swatches of fabric, the works act as conjuring devices, giving the viewer leave to create their own Linda provided it is within the bounds which dictates her persona.

 

linda 216 A4 digital prints, pins on board approx. 350 x 250 x 60 cm. Image supplied by artist.
linda 216 A4 digital prints, pins on board approx. 350 x 250 x 60 cm. Image supplied by artist.

Dani Marti is a Sydney-based artist. He has had exhibitions at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Artspace, Gitte Weiss Gallery and Gallery 19.

Kate Beynon: Li Ji: Warrior Girl

15 March – 14 April, 2001

Li Ji: Warrior Girl is an animated video and audio installation by Kate Beynon. Li Ji is the modern reincarnation of an ancient Chinese heroine by the same name. As she wanders through Melbourne at night, she encounters new hostilities. But unlike the treat of the maiden-eating python of her past life, Li Ji battles with the issue of being accepted as Australian. Li Ji: Warrior Girl is an exploration into the complex issues of race, identity, migration and belonging.

Eugenia Raskopoulos: Untitled 00

27 September – 21 October 2000

In the experimental spirit of the Picasso flashlight drawings, Eugenia Raskopoulos has created an elegant photographic exhibition that plays with the veracity of the black and white image. Untitled 00 is an extension of work exhibited earlier this year at the Australian Centre for Photography where the artist, light source in hand, documented the making of minimal and extravagant gestures in front of the camera.

Sue Pedley: Midday – Sound to Drawing, Drawing to Sound

2 – 26 August 2000

Sue Pedley’s installation at Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] has been inspired by her participation in the Second Vietnamese Sculptural Symposium held in Hue in 1998. Using sounds that she has recorded from her local environment, her prints and installation expand upon ideas of visual and audio pattern and rhythm, representing vibrations of sound and silence with colour and line.

Persuasion

16 February – 18 March, 2000

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Michael Shaowanasai and Toby Huynh

Thai male prostitutes and the rituals of Chinese marriage feature in this exhibition by Thai-American Michael Shoawanasai and Vietnamese-Australian Toby Huynh.

Michael Shaowanasai focuses on sex for sale. His works at alternative galleries and public sites in Bangkok explore the male sex worker in one of the most infamous destinations for sex tourism within our region. Shaowanasai’s installation and performances for the Festival critically evaluate the sex industry in Thailand by recreating a Go-Go bar, complete with instructional video.

Toby Huynh’s digital images explore the rituals associated with Chinese marriages. Huynh’s work proposes and alternative set of rituals that Buddhist same-sex couples could perform. Would couples, for instance, kneel down in front of their ancestors and offer them tea? These images subtly evoke the tension between traditional cultural and religious values and contemporary gay and lesbian life.

Persuasion is a visual art event for the 2000 Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival.

Li Shan: Skin Secrets

11 February – 6 March 1999

Li Shan is one of China’s most exciting artists. His sensuous paintings explore male sexuality through metaphor. The massive paintings of the Rouge series, for instance, feature photo-realistic black and white images of male nudes sprouting magenta and white lotus flowers.

These powerful works comment on issues related to aesthetics within China. Flower painting is a well respected Chinese tradition but in La Shan’s paintings flowers come to represent vitality and sexuality.

Skin Secrets is a visual arts event for the 1999 Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival.

Culture Graft

24 September – 10 October 1998

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Ah Xian (b. 1960, Beijing, China), Wang Zhiyuan (b. 1958, Tianjin, China) and Guan Wei (b. 1957, Beijing, China)

Culture Graft is the title of an exhibition featuring the work of three Chinese-Australian artists: Ah Xian, Wang Zhiyuan and Guan Wei. The title of this exhibition is intended to suggest the difficult and sometimes contradictory processes of acculturation – on aspect of the experience of migration – by using botanical technique of grafting as a metaphor. The definition of graft describes the coming together of two separate strands, while meld and grow together to become one. In the context of this exhibition this metaphor highlights a tension between different cultures (Chinese and Australian) making a clear distinction between the past and present.

wang_zhiyuan_the_old_fable_98_the_new_century_children_story_ink_on_paper

Wang Zhiyuan, The Old Fable, 1998, ink on paper. Courtesy the artist.
Header image: Ah Xian, Fading Book Series – Mother Theresa (detail), 1998, toner on cloth bound book. Courtesy the artist.

Truong Tan: AIDS HeART

12 – 28 February 1998

Curator: Melissia Chiu
Artist: Truong Tan (b. Hanoi)

Truong Tan’s arresting lacquer panels and works on rice paper principally deal with gay issues in Vietnam. He poses questions related to the demonisation of gay people in government propaganda as well as the lack of serious health measures against the spread of AIDS. In effect, he questions moral and social attitudes in Vietnam towards gay men and women.

Linda Sang: Chinoiserie

4 – 27 September 1997

Chinoiserie was Linda Sang’s new exhibition at Gallery 4A. Utilising food from Chinese cooking as a material for art, Sang prepared a visual delight.

Linda Sang created a tableau which mimics a traditional Chinese household. Latticework window screens, red plush carpet and claw feet table provided a setting for the unexpected.

 

Header Image: Chinoiserie, 1997, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. From clockwise left to right: Linda Sang, Moss Table, 1997, painted wood, moss. Linda Sang, Tripe Butterfly Chair, 1995, latex, steel. Linda Sang, Jack Fruit Footstool, 1997, wood, latex. Linda Sang, “Miss Sang” after “Miss Wong”, Tretchlkoff, 1997, oil on canvas, wood, painted by Jude Walker. Linda Sang, Chinese Cabbage Standing Lamp, 1997, latex, steel, perspex. Linda Sang, Bitter Melon Butterfly Chair, 1997, latex, steel. With thanks to Jude Walker and Gail Daley. All images courtesy the artist. 

SNACK CHAT with Chun Yin Rainbow Chan with participants from Akira Takayama’s ​Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project

SYDNEY // Thursday 5 April // 6.00PM – 7.00PM

Be part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art’s Biennale of Sydney program SNACKCHAT . Partake in a conversation about the cultural fabric of Sydney with participant’s from Akira Takayama’s video work Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Theatre while enjoying some snacks from Hong Kong.

For this edition of SNACKCHAT Chun Yin Rainbow Chan and her mother Irene Chan reperform their songs from Akira Takayama’s Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Theatre and step you through a history of their family in Hong Kong. Accompanied by a visual presentation this is a SNACKCHAT not to miss!

This event is presented in collaboration with the 21st Biennale of Sydney.

Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, pictured with her mum Irene Chan. Photo: 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, pictured with her mum Irene Chan. Photo: 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

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SNACKCHAT is a new series of events by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, creating conversations about Sydney’s diverse cultural fabric over shared snacks from different community groups.

Image: Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Theatre, 2018. Courtesy the artist and the Biennale of Sydney.

Community Offering: The Burrangong Affray

YOUNG, NSW. 21 April. From 10am

On April 21, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art led a community event with Australian-Chinese artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge in response the to events of The Burrangong Affray, including the Lambing Flat Riots, 1860 -1861.

We invited the community of Young and the surrounding areas to join the artists as they create a tribute at Chinese Cemetery, Murrumburrah and Blackguard Gully, Young. At each site the artists will lead us in a ceremony of incense burning, offerings and ceremonial gestures to welcome good luck and banish the bad spirits of the past.

Community members joined the artists as they pay tribute to these sites and these historic events.

This event forms part The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu & John Young Zerunge exhibition.

Images below capture part of the day’s performance processes and events. All images: 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:

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Top image: Currawong Farm. Photo: Jason Phu.

SNACK CHAT with the Parents’ Cafe: with participants from Akira Takayama’s ​Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project

SYDNEY // Wednesday 14 March // 6.30PM – 8.00PM

Be part of the first SNACKCHAT  – and partake in a conversation about the cultural fabric of Sydney with participant’s from Akira Takayama’s video work Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Theatre while enjoying some snacks from Fairfield’s Parents’ Cafe.

This event is presented in collaboration with the 21st Biennale of Sydney.

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SNACKCHAT is a new series of events by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, creating conversations about Sydney’s diverse cultural fabric over shared snacks from different community groups.

 

Image: Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Theatre, 2018. Courtesy the artist and the Biennale of Sydney.

4A x Para Site at Melbourne Art Book Fair

Friday 16 – Sunday 18 March, 2018
Melbourne Art Book Fair
National Gallery of Victoria

Since its launch in 2015, the annual Melbourne Art Book Fair has attracted more than 50,000 visitors making it the most visited publishing event in the Asia-Pacific region.

The fourth Melbourne Art Book Fair in 2018 will bring together international and local publishers and practitioners in a weekend of free talks, book launches, performances, and stalls featuring art, design, architecture and photography publications from around the world.

Opening Hours
Friday 16 March: 10am – 5pm and 6 – 9pm
Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 March: 10am – 5pm

Para Site is Hong Kong’s leading contemporary art centre and one of the oldest and most active independent art institutions in Asia. It produces exhibitions, publications, discursive, and educational projects aimed at forging a critical understanding of local and international phenomena in art and society.

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) is an independent not-for-profit organisation based in Sydney, Australia. 4A fosters excellence and innovation in contemporary culture through the commissioning, presentation, documentation and research of contemporary art. Our program is presented throughout Australia and Asia , where we ensure that contemporary art plays a central role in understanding and developing the dynamic relationship between Australia and the wider Asian region.

Breakfast with a Botanist

SYDNEY. SATURDAY 11 NOV 11AM – 12.30PM

As part of our Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu exhibition program, join botanist David Mabberley and exhibition curator Micheal Do as they delve into the world of botanicals and art over breakfast in the heart of bustling Chinatown.

About David Mabberley
Professor David J. Mabberley AM is a British-born, Australian educator and author. He was consecutively Director of the University of Washington Botanic Gardens (Seattle, USA), Keeper of the Herbarium, Library, Art and Archives at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew (United Kingdom) and Executive Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney. He is now an Emeritus Fellow, Wadham College, University of Oxford (United Kingdom), Professor Extraordinary, University of Leiden (The Netherlands) and Adjunct Professor, Macquarie University, Sydney. Among his varied academic interests are the taxonomy of tropical trees, notably citrus, and the history of science and botanical art. Internationally he is perhaps best known as author of the award-winning Mabberley’s plant-book: a portable dictionary of plants, their classification and uses, now in its fourth edition (2017). Of his six books on botanical art, Joseph Banks; Florilegium (Thames & Hudson) and Painting by Numbers: the life and art of Ferdinand Bauer (NewSouth) are also published this year.

Image courtesy The Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford.

Please Explain: The artist and flower: Responding to Banks and Botanicals

SYDNEY. WEDNESDAY 15 NOV 6 – 8PM.

As part of our Please Explain talks series, join Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu exhibition artist James Tylor and expert historians and botanists in a discussion of the work of Sir Joseph Banks and how artists are working to respond with and against this colonial science, history and legacy.

Speakers’ Biographies: 

Ann Elias

Ann Elias is Associate Professor in Art History at the University of Sydney. Research interests include: camouflage as a military, social and aesthetic phenomenon; flowers and their cultural history; coral reef imagery of the underwater realm. Books include Camouflage Australia: art, nature, science and war (2011), Useless Beauty: flowers and Australian art (2015), and Coral Empire (in preparation for Duke University Press) about photographic and cinematic representations of the underwater at the colonial tropics in the early twentieth century. She is a Key Researcher with the Sydney Environment Institute, a serving member of the International Committee of the College Art Association of America, and International Liaison for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand.

David Mabberley

Professor David J. Mabberley AM is a British-born, Australian educator and author. He was consecutively Director of the University of Washington Botanic Gardens (Seattle, USA), Keeper of the Herbarium, Library, Art and Archives at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew (United Kingdom) and Executive Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney. He is now an Emeritus Fellow, Wadham College, University of Oxford (United Kingdom), Professor Extraordinary, University of Leiden (The Netherlands) and Adjunct Professor, Macquarie University, Sydney. Among his varied academic interests are the taxonomy of tropical trees, notably citrus, and the history of science and botanical art. Internationally he is perhaps best known as author of the award-winning Mabberley’s plant-book: a portable dictionary of plants,their classification and uses, now in its fourth edition (2017). Of his six books on botanical art, Joseph Banks; Florilegium (Thames & Hudson) and Painting by Numbers: the life and art of Ferdinand Bauer (NewSouth) are also published this year.

Richard Neville

Richard Neville is the Mitchell Librarian and Director of Education & Scholarship at the State Library of NSW. With a research background and acknowledged expertise in nineteenth Australian art and culture, he has published widely on colonial art and society, and curated numerous exhibitions focusing on these areas. He has also been extensively involved in the acquisition, arrangement, description and promotion of the Library’s renowned Australian research collections.

James Tylor

James’ artistic practice examines concepts around cultural identity in Australian contemporary society and social history. He explores Australian cultural representations through his multi-cultural heritage, which comprises Nunga (Kaurna), Māori (Te Arawa) and European (English, Scottish, Irish, Dutch, Iberian and Norwegian) Australian ancestry. James’ work focuses largely on the 19th century history of Australia and its continual effect on present day issues surrounding cultural identity in Australia.

About Please Explain:

4A’s new series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia.

Image credit: Sir Joseph Banks, Florilegium: Plate 63 (detail), 1980 – 1990, copperplate engraving. Image courtesy Angela Tandoori, Melbourne.

Political Practice: Independent spaces and projects in the Asia Pacific

SYDNEY — THURSDAY 23 NOVEMBER 2017 — 6.15PM

Join 4A for an evening discussion moderated by Kelly Doley.

This panel will focus on the role of independent grassroots spaces and projects in the Asia Pacific working together to support experimentation, political and critical practices and forge responsive conversations that larger institutions may not be able to provide. International panelists Anna Eschbach and Antonie Angerer discuss the complexities and successes of running one of Beijing’s first independent spaces alongside 4A’s Director Mikala Tai and Jeff Khan, the artistic director of Performance Space. Pondering questions of cross platform partnerships, transnational programming, methodologies for supporting experimental artistic practice and ideas of feminist performance practice this discussion will be robust and dynamic.

This event will be Auslan interpreted thanks to support from the Australia Council for the Arts. 

 

Speakers:

Kelly Doley, independent artist and curator (Feminist South project)

Anna Eschbach and Antonie Angerer, Directors of i:project space, Beijing China

Jeff Khan, Artistic Director, Performance Space and curator of Liveworks Festival

Mikala Tai, Director, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

4A Night Walk

SYDNEY — THURSDAY 1 FEBRUARY 2018 — 6.00PM

Experience China town’s food culture and public art under the the evening glow of its neon lights.

As part of the City of Sydney’s Sydney Chinese New Year Festival celebrations, 4A will lead a evening tour of Sydney’s China town that includes a brief history of its public art and magnetic regional cuisine.

The tour will also include a private tour of 4A’s exhibition, ‘Equal Area‘.

Image courtesy Lukezemephotography, Flickr. Image used under a Creative Commons License. 

Congee Breakfast Tour – Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area

SYDNEY — SATURDAY 17 FEBRUARY — 10.00AM – 12:00PM

Join the 4A team on a morning tour of the heart of Sydney’s Chinatown, it’s art and magnetic regional cuisine.

As part of Lunar New Year celebrations, 4A will lead a morning tour of Sydney’s Chinatown that includes it’s public art and it’s magnetic regional cuisine.

The tour will include a private tour of 4A’s exhibition, ‘Equal Area‘ and culminate with a traditional Taiwanese congee breakfast.

Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu

 SYDNEY.  27 OCTOBER  – 10 DECEMBER 2017.

Artists:
Sir Joseph Banks
Daniel Boyd
Newell Harry
Fiona Pardington
Michael Parekowhai
James Tylor

Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu examines how artists disturb the past by reframing and reworking the mythologies of nationhood. Focusing on the legacies of British imperialism in the South Pacific, the works presented in this exhibition offer a counterpoint to historical narratives that have emerged within colonial modes of scientific categorisation.

The voyage of the HMS Endeavour from 1768–1771, led by the then little known Lieutenant James Cook with botanist Joseph Banks, collected a staggering quantity of plant life from across the Asia Pacific – approximately 30,000 specimens from Australia and New Zealand alone, representing over 3,000 species, of which 1,400 were wholly new to science.[1]

The scale of this taxonomy, the science of naming and defining plant and animal life was, for these pioneers, without precedent and in many cases they created unstable, even flawed, systems of vocabulary, hierarchies and methods to describe this ‘new world’. [2]

Many of these instances outlast them to this day, for example, Cook named the ‘Kangaroo’ phonetically after ‘gangurru’, the term used by Aboriginal people on the North-East coast for local, large, grey marsupials. [3] Had Cook realised the plurality of Aboriginal language and that this word was foreign to most Indigenous people in Australia, the outcome could have been very different.[4] Nevertheless, examples like this set the template for generations of legends and myths.

The Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu draws upon these conflicting (and occasionally confounding) myths. By investigating and subverting colonial prejudices inherent in the formulation of language and conceptions of nature, the artists provide new frameworks and connections, enabling us to recognise the world anew.

A selection of archival and recent works from artists Sir Joseph Banks (United Kingdom), Daniel Boyd (Australia), Newell Harry (Australia), Fiona Pardington (New Zealand), Michael Parekowhai (New Zealand) and James Tylor (Australia) is brought together for this exhibition – inclusive of a series of Banks’ copperplate etchings of Australian botanical illustration rarely seen in a contemporary exhibition context. This exhibition continues 4A’s series of exhibition projects that examine the shared histories and ties between Australia and our Asia-Pacific neighbours.

 

About the artists:

Sir Joseph Banks

b. 1743, London, England d. 1820, London, England

Sir Joseph Banks, 1st Baronet, GBC, PRS was a highly decorated British naturalist and botanist that made a number of significant contributions towards the natural sciences. Following his election as President of the Royal Society, he and collaborators boarded the HMS Endeavour, James Cook’s first great voyage of Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia and the Pacifc. During this trip, he and his team collected over 30 000 specimens from Australia and New Zealand alone, representing 3 000 species, of which 1400 were wholly new to science. Illustrator Sydney Parkinson documented these specimens. Through this momentous trip, he would become a de-facto ambassador for Australia as a destination for botanic research during England’s colonial project. Upon his return to England, Banks and lifelong collaborator, Daniel Solander oversaw an encyclopedic engravings of plant life using the illustrations by Sydney Parkinson. These were printed in black ink, and then in colour ink almost 200 years after Bank’s death.

Daniel Boyd

Kudjila/Gangalu b. 1982, Cairns, Australia lives and works in Sydney, Australia

Daniel Boyd is internationally recognised for his contemporary history paintings that interrogate Eurocentric perspectives of Australian colonial history. His technique borrows from Central Australian Aboriginal dot paintings and Impressionist pointillism, imbuing colonial scenes and ancestral figures with an affecting sense of intrigue, memorialisation and loss. His recent exhibitions include: Bitter Sweet, Cairns Art Gallery, Cairns, Australia (2017); All the World’s Futures, 56th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2015); Moscow International Biennale for Young Arts: A Time for Dreams, Moscow, Russia (2014); Bungaree: The First Australian, Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery, Lake Macquarie, Australia (2013); The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2012); One Caption Hides Another, Bétonsalon, Paris, France (2011); We Call Them Pirates Out Here, MCA, Sydney, Australia (2010); Contemporary Australia: Optimism, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2008); and Culture Warriors: National Indigenous Art Triennial, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia (2007). Boyd’s work are held in the collections of the Natural History Museum, London, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, Australia; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia and Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Newell Harry

b. 1972, Sydney, Australia lives and works in Sydney, Australia

Newell Harry’s practice encompasses a wide range of processes, media and installations that feature cultural references drawn from his travels – from Australia’s eastern seaboard, to the Vanauato archipelago, India, north-east Asia and his ancestral home of Capetown, South Africa. His works consider the legacies of the colonial project on native language, culture, politics and economies throughout these regions. His recent exhibitions include: Tidalectics, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art 21, Autgarten, Vienna, Austria (2017); Sonnant et trebuchant, Les Abattoirs, Musee FRAC Occitan, Toulouse, France (2017); Grounded, National Art School Gallery, Sydney, Australia (2017); Sugar Spin: You, Me, Art and Everything Else, Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2016); Tarrawarra Biennial of Australian Art, Tarrawarra Museum of Art, TarraWarra, Australia (2016); All the World’s Futures56th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2015) and (Untitled) 12th Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul, Turkey (2012). Harry’s works are held in the collections of Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia; Newcastle Art Gallery, Sydney, Australia; Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia and Monash University Art Collection, Melbourne, Australia.

Fiona Pardington

b. 1961, Auckland, New Zealand lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand

Fiona Pardington photographic practice delves deep into the world of public and private collections. Using the still life format Pardington has photographed museum objects, particularly ‘taonga’, objects sacred to Maori culture. She often presents these treasures alongside a tableau of native flora and fauna, and found objects – creating unique portraits of historical and contemporary Maori, New Zealand and pacific culture. Her recent exhibitions include: A Beautiful Hesitation, City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand; Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki, Auckland, New Zealand; Christchurch Art Gallery,Christchurch New Zealand (2015-16); In My Dreaming I Saw – Moea Iho Nei I Au, Suite, Wellington, New Zealand, (2015); lux et tenebris Momentum Worldwide, Berlin, Germany (2014); Supernatural, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, Australia (2014) and The Pressure of Sunlight Falling, Govett-Brewster Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand (2011). Pardington’s works are held in the collections of Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, France; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada; National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C, USA; Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia; Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, New Zealand; Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand and Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney, Australia.

Michael Parekowhai

b. 1968, Wellington, New Zealand lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand

Michael Parekowhai carefully dissects Maori identity politics, culture and history through his layered art making that warps references and allusions to art history, personal memories, grand-narratives of nationhood and popular culture. Through lustrous photographs, sculpture and installation, he reinvents these imagery and material, creating quirky parables that invite open interpretation and intrigue. His recent exhibitions include: The English Channel, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2017); Soft Core, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, Sydney, Australia (2016); Michael Parekowhai: The Promised Land, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2015); Menagerie, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), Melbourne, Australia (2014); On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer, Christchurch Art Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand (2013); Peripheral Relations; Marcel Duchamp and New Zealand Art 1960-2011, Adam Art Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand (2012) and On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer, Palazzo Loredan Dell’Ambasciatore, Dorsoduro, Venice (representing New Zealand), 54th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2011). Parekowhai’s work is held in the collections of Musee Du Quai Branly, Paris, France; Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand; Te Papa Tongarewa, Museum of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia and Arario Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea.

James Tylor

Nunga (Kaurna) and Maori (Te Arawa). b. 1986 Mildura, Australia lives and works in Adelaide, Australia

James Tylor examines cultural identity in Australian contemporary culture. Using the lens of his multi-cultural heritage, which comprises Nunga (Kaurna), Māori (Te Arawa) and European (English, Scottish, Irish, Dutch, Iberian and Norwegian) Australian ancestry, he experiments with range of historical and experimental photographic processes, to examine 19th century Australian history and its legacy on identity in Australia. His recent exhibitions include: Resolution: New Indigenous Photomedia, Shepparton Art Museum, Shepparton, Australia (2017); The witching hour, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, Australia (2017); Ramsay Art Prize Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia (2017, finalist); New Matter: Recent forms of Photographs, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (2016); Endless Circulation: TarraWarra Biennial, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Healesville, Australia (2016) and Territorial Encounters, Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia (2016). Tylor’s works are held in the collections of Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.


[1] P. J. Hatfield., The Material History of the Endeavour in Chambers, N. (ed.), Endeavouring Banks (London: Paul Holberton Publishing, 2016).

[2] M. Hetherington and H. Morphy, Footprints in the Sand: Banks’s Maori collection, Cook’s first voyage 1768-71 (Canberra: National Museum of Australia, 2009).

[3] R. Cilento, 1971, Sir Joseph Banks, F.R.S., and the Naming of the Kangaroo, Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, 26, pp. 157 -161 and H. Parsons, British-Tahitian collaborative drawing strategies on Cook’s Endeavour voyage in Shino Konishi, Maria Nugent and Tiffany Shellam (ed.), Indigenous Intermediaries: new perspectives on exploration archives (Canberra: Australia National University Press, 2015).

[4] Ibid.

 

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

 

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Foreground: Michael Parekowhai, The Moment of Cubism & Nude Descending a Staircase 2009, hand-finished bronze, patina.
Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney. 
Background: Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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L – R: Michael Parekowhai (from the series ‘Beverly Hills Gun Club’), Alex Hamilton, Dave Douglas, J.D. Jones, 2004, 
s
parrow, two pot paint, aluminium, 78 x 13 x 10 cm eachCourtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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Foreground: Daniel Boyd, Decomissioned skull boxes, Natural History Museum, London, 2013.
Background: Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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L – R: Fiona Pardington, Still Life with Freud and Puriri, 2012, pigment inks on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag, 82.5 x 110 cm. Fiona Pardington,
Captive Female Huia, 2017, pigment inks on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag, 110 x 146 cm. With thanks Te Manawa Museum, New Zealand.
Courtesy the artist and Starkwhite, Auckland.

 

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L – R: Daniel Boyd, King No Beard, 2008, oil on linen, 167 x 122 cm. Collection, Clinton Ng. Daniel Boyd, Sir No Beard, 2009, oil
on canvas, 153 x 137.5 cm. Courtesy the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney and STATION, Melbourne.

 

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L – R: Sir Joseph Banks, Florilegium: Plate 63 (edition 100/100), 1980 – 1990, copperplate engraving. Sir Joseph Banks, Florilegium:
Plate 57
(edition 100/100). 1980 – 1990, copperplate engraving. Courtesy Angela Tandori Fine Art, Melbourne. James Tylor, Terra
Botanica I (Eucalyptus gracilis), Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon)
Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon II), Terra
Botanica I (Grevillea banksii), Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), Terra Botanica II (Agathis-australis), Terra Botanica
II (Banksia ericifolia), Terra Botanica II (Ipomoea batatas I, Kūmara), Terra Botanica II (Metrosideros-excelsa, Pohutukawa)
,
2015, becquerel daguerreotype, various dimensions. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne.

 

 

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L – R: James Tylor, Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), 2015, becquerel daguerreotype, 28 x 23 cm. James Tylor, Terra
Botanica II (Agathis-australis)
, 2015, becquerel daguerreotype, 14 x 11 cm. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne. 

 

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Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: WHITE WHINE, 2010, neon. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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L – R: Michael Parekowhai (from the series ‘Beverly Hills Gun Club’), John Taffin, Alex Hamilton, Dave Douglas, J.D. Jones, 2004, 
s
parrow, two pot paint, aluminium, 78 x 13 x 10 cm eachCourtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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James Tylor, Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus gracilis), Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon)Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon II),
Terra Botanica I (Grevillea banksii), Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), Terra Botanica II (Agathis-australis), Terra Botanica
II (Banksia ericifolia), Terra Botanica II (Ipomoea batatas I, Kūmara), Terra Botanica II (Metrosideros-excelsa, Pohutukawa)
, 2015,

becquerel daguerreotype, various dimensions. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne.

 

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Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: WHITE WHINE, 2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5 cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: LEVEL ROTOR,
2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5 cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: AVID DIVA, 2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s
in the Round: MALAYALAM RACECAR,
2010, neon, 135 x 175 x 5 cm.

I don’t want to be there when it happens

PERTH. 11 NOVEMBER – 24 DECEMBER

Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts

Raqs Media Collective
Reena Saini Kallat
Raj Kumar
Sonia Leber & David Chesworth
Mithu Sen
Adeela Suleman
Abdullah M I Syed

Starting from the fragile and complex socio-political relationship between India and Pakistan in the era of contemporary warfare, I don’t want to be there when it happens investigates, in a broader sense, the psychology of trauma.

The artists invited to participate in this exhibition reference unpleasant situations; from their own everyday experience of the contradictions and problems they face in their personal universe to the alarming signals of the profound existential unease of our age.

I don’t want to be there when it happens explores the relationship between art practice and trauma, loss and grief. It is an examination of what art can contribute in the aftermath of such experiences, of how it can produce meaning and discourse through the act of engagement.

The exhibition is organised as partnership between the Perth Institute for Contemporary Arts(PICA) and 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art and expanded on the occasion of its presentation at PICA. The original exhibition was held at 4A between August and October.

Adeela Suleman’s work to be shown in I don’t want to be there when it happens has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and The Keir Foundation.

Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area

SYDNEY. 20 JANUARY – 25 FEBRUARY 2018

Lee Kun-Yong with Australian artists Huseyin Sami, Daniel Von Sturmer and Emily Parsons-Lord.

Equal Area presents the work of Lee Kun-Yong, one of Korea’s most seminal conceptual artists, charting the development of his visual and theoretical methodology that has expanded possibilities for performance art since the 1970s. Lee is widely acclaimed for his innovative series of performances that examine the the connection between the logic of the mind and the gestures of the body. Throughout his career, Lee has investigated the connection between the human psyche and action through the act of performance and performance. His performances often test this relationship through the act of repetition, demonstrating how the construct of logic is subjective to its locale — slight shifts in each performance capture the body within present moments, leaving traces of an ‘event’.

In this unique presentation of photographic documentation of performances spanning his almost six-decade career, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art brings Lee Kun-Yong’s practice into dialogue with three contemporary Australian artists. Equal Area opens with a special performance of Snail’s Gallop, one of his most critically lauded works which he is staging in Australia for the first time. This is followed by a series of performances and live interventions by Australian artists, taking place in dialogue with the residue of Lee’s performances, that build on this examination of the repeated gesture and elucidate Lee’s influence on global contemporary performative practice.

 


 

Lee Kun-Yong (b. 1942, Sariwon, Korea; lives and works in Gunsan, Korea) is one of Korea’s most seminal conceptual artists, exploring the nexus between the human mind and its connection to the world. His experimental performative practice emerged in 1970s South Korea, a period where the country was marked by diminished civil rights and martial law, including civilian assembly controls and tightly scrutinised codes of social propriety. Through this period, Lee led numerous artistic responses to the political climate, creating subversive automated drawing experiments that made subtle yet identifiable comments on the authoritarian state. He continues his line of experimentation today, collaborating with new artists and bringing his messaging into the 21st century.

Lee Kun-Yong’s exhibition history includes: Experimental Art of Suwon in the 1980–1990s: It’s Not Quite That (2017), Suwon iPark Museum of Art, Suwon, Korea; As the Moon Waxes and Wanes (2016), National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Gwacheon, Korea (MMCA); Lee Kun-Yong in Snail’s Gallop (2014), MMCA; Korean Historical Conceptual Art 1970–80s: Jack-of-all-trades (2010), Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, Ansan, Korea; Lee Kun-Yong: Logic, Life, Commonplace (1998), Fine Arts Center of The Korean Culture and Arts Foundation, Seoul, Korea; A Groping for the Identity of Korean Contemporary Art II: The Art in the ‘Reduction’ and ‘Expansion’ Period (1991), Hanwon Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Korean Contemporary Art: The Trend of the 1970s (1974), Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei, Taiwan; 8th Biennale de Paris (1973), Paris, France; and 15th Bienal de São Paulo (1979), São Paulo, Brazil.

His works are held in numerous public and private collections, including the Jeonbuk Museum of Art, Wanju, Korea; Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea; National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea; Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea, and The Rachofsky Collection, Dallas, USA.

 

Emily Parsons-Lord (b. 1984, Bathurst, NSW; lives and works Sydney) is a cross-disciplinary contemporary artist whose art and practice is informed by research and critical dialogue with materials and climate science, through investigation into air and light, both materially, and culturally. Parsons-Lord’s work interrogates notions of the ‘natural’, the universe, and considers deep history and speculative futures, with works that engaged with the materiality of invisibility, magic, and the stories we tell about reality.

Select exhibitions include: NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging), Artspace, Sydney (2017); There is nothing accidental or surprising about this, Vitalstatistix for Climate Century, Port Adelaide (2017-2018); The Future Leaks Out, Liveworks Festival, Carriageworks, Sydney (2017); Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2016); Trod by Beasts Alone, Wellington St Projects, Sydney (2017); Bristol Biennial: In Other Worlds, Bristol, UK (2016); Our Fetid Rank (Margaret Thatcher’s bottom lip and Bill Clinton’s tongue),  Firstdraft, Sydney (2015);  Ever Fresh, STILLS gallery, Sydney (2015); Underbelly Arts 2015, Cockatoo Island,  Sydney (2015); busied and bruised with looking, Perth Centre for Photography, Perth (2015).

Parsons-Lord has been a finalist in the NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging) in 2017 and the Fishers’ Ghost Award in 2016. Her work is held in the collection of Artbank, Australia.

Huseyin Sami (b. 1979, United Kingdom; lives and works Sydney) has been exhibiting since the late 1990s, with a multi-disciplinary practice that engages with painting, sculpture and installation. Sami’s work challenges and investigates the possibilities of paint itself – working with the colour, form and materiality of household acrylic paints but without any of the tools, gestures or decisions normally associated with the medium – letting paint drop and pool and paintings to ‘virtually make themselves’. Sami’s practice poses questions and develops new strategies for the production of paintings.

Selected exhibitions include Superposition of three types, Artspace, Sydney (2017); Shut up and Paint, National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), Melbourne (2016); Whispers from a Band of Myth Makers, Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney (2015); Assemblage II, 107 Redfern Projects, Sydney (2014); Never Underestimate a Monochrome, Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art, Rancho Cucamonga, USA (2013); 3, with Koji Ryui and Brandan Van Hek, Alaska Projects, Sydney (2013); Twenty/20, UTS Gallery, Sydney and Dubbo Regional Gallery, NSW (2010); Blue Blah! And other works, Kunst Projects, Berlin, Germany (2009); and Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2004). He was the winner of the 2005 Fauvette Louriero Memorial Artists Travel Scholarship.w

Sami’s work is held in many public collections, including that of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Artbank, Australia; Saatchi & Saatchi, New Zealand, as well as in private collections in Australia, Germany, Great Britain, Japan and the United States.

 

Daniel von Sturmer (b. Auckland, New Zealand, 1972; lives and works in Melbourne) is a leading video and multimedia artist whose works investigate and orchestrate the fields of relation between things, people, light, space, video and time. von Sturmer’s practice integrates video, photography and installation and often tests the ways in which the audience views artworks inside and outside the gallery.

In 2007, von Sturmer represented Australia at the 52nd Venice Biennale, showing in the Australian Pavilion. Recent exhibitions include: Electric Light (facts/figure), Bus Projects, Melbourne (2017); Under the Sun, State Library of New South Wales, Sydney and Monash Gallery of Art, Melbourne (2017); Red Green Blue: A History of Australian Video Art, Griffith University Art Gallery, Queensland College of Art, Brisbane (2017); Collective Visions: 130 Years, Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria (2017); Shut Up and Paint, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2016); The Kaleidoscopic Turn, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2015); 21st Century Heide: The Collection Since 2000, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria (2015); Camera Ready Actions, Young Projects Gallery, Los Angeles (2014); Daniel von Sturmer, Co­lumbus Museum of Art, Ohio (2013); Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2013); Time & Vision: New work from Australian artists, The Bargehouse, London (2012); Nego­tiating this world: Contemporary Australian Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2012); Set Piece, Site Gallery, Shef­field, United Kingdom (2009); The Object of Things, Australian Pavilion, Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2007).

von Sturmer’s work is held held in a number of significant collections, including that of the Gothenburg Museum of Art, Sweden; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand; Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne; Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria; Chartwell Collection, New Zealand; Dunedin Public Art Gallery, New Zealand; The Michael Buxton Contemporary Australian Art Collection, Melbourne; Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne; Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales; and Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane.

 

Exhibition Documentation

 

 

4a-jan-18-20

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Eating Biscuit, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) biscuits, bandages and splints, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-22

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Eating Biscuit, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) biscuits, bandages and splints, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography.

4a-jan-18-13

Installation view (pre-performance): Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) acrylic on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Pre-performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-26

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Back: Lee Kun-Yong performing The method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, acrylic paint on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea.

 

4a-jan-18-38

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, The Method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, re-performed in 2018. Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. These works have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-59

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Pre-performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, The Method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1976, re-performed in 2018. Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. These works have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-64

Lee Kun-Yong performing Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-1

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Pictured: Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, performance, acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

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Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Terrorism is an enemy of Humankind (re-performed in 2017), white sheet, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) acrylic on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-9

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Left to right: Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, (re-performed in 2018), Acrylic paint on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Daniel von Sturmer, Electric Light (facts/figures/4A), 2017, animated light installation, dimensions variableLee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-4, first performed in 1976 (re-performed in 2017), dimensions variable. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

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Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Left to right: Lee Kun-Yong and Huseyin Sami, The method of Drawing 76-1-18 and Painting Performance (with feet), 2018. Acrylic paint on door, dimensions variable. Lee’s work courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Sami’s work courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery.

 

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Installation detail view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Emily Parsons-Lord, a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable. Behind, left to right: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong Logic of Place, first performed in 1975, (re-printed in 2017), C-type print, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-printed in 2017) paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-4, first performed in 1976 (re-printed in 2017),paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. All courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography Image: Document Photography.

 

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Front: Emily Parsons-Lord, a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

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Front: Emily Parsons-Lord performing a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

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Front: Emily Parsons-Lord performing a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

Club 4A

MELBOURNE 17 FEBRUARY & SYDNEY 23 FEBRUARY, 2018

Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan) headline Club 4A in Sydney and Melbourne this Lunar New Year.

 

In February, 4A takes performance art back to the club. 4A has been working with some of the most exciting and adventurous performance artists over recent years and in 2018 we leave the confines of the white cube and venture into the darkness of the club! For one night only, Club 4A in Sydney and Melbourne will present some of Australia’s leading performance artists as well as acclaimed international acts.

In Melbourne on Saturday 17 February as part of White Night, Club 4A takes over the Toff in Town with Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan), with additional artists: Makeda, Strict Face, Jalé , and Coris.

In Sydney on Friday 23 February, head down to Dynasty Karaoke to see with Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan), supported by Slim Set, Tzekin (V Kim), and Jikuroux  and Coris (DJ).

Tickets for Club 4A Sydney have officially SOLD OUT.

SET TIMES

Doors: 7.00pm
Coris x Amrita Hepi: 7.00pm
Slim Set: 8.00pm
DEADKEBAB & PSYCHIC$: 9.00pm
Rainbow Chan: 10.00pm
Tzekin: 11.00pm
Jikuroux: 12.00am
DJ Plead: 1.00am
DJs b2b2b2…..: 2.00am – close

 

LISTEN // CLUB 4A Melbourne Mix // 17 Feb 2018

 

LISTEN // CLUB 4A Sydney  Mix // 23 Feb 2018

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium and Engagement – 21st Biennale of Sydney

SYDNEY. 16 MARCH – 11 JUNE 2018.

 

21st Biennale of Sydney

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

16 March – 11 June, 2018

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and other venues

Artistic Director: Mami Kataoka

 

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement will examine the theory of ‘superposition’ by investigating how it might operate in the world today. 70 leading international artists – chosen to offer a panoramic view of how opposing interpretations, can come together – will participate across seven venues. The exhibition at Artspace, Sydney will feature exceptional new projects by a diverse field of celebrated international artists.

 

Exhibiting artists at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:

Akira Takayama: Born 1969 in Saitama, Japan. Lives and works in Tokyo, Japan; Yokohama, Japan; and Frankfurt, Germany
Jun Yang: Born 1975 in Qingtian, China. Lives and works in Vienna, Austria; Taipei, Taiwan; and Yokohama, Japan

 

Biennale of Sydney

2018 marks the 45th anniversary of the Biennale of Sydney and its twenty-first edition. The Biennale provides a platform for art and ideas and is recognised for commissioning and presenting innovative, thought-provoking art from Australia and around the globe. A leading international art event, The Biennale of Sydney has showcased the work of nearly 1,800 artists from more than 100 countries. It has attracted over 4 million visitors since its inception in 1973 and holds an important place on both the national and international stage.

The Biennale of Sydney is located on the traditional lands of the Gadigal people of the Eora nation. We acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Land and pay respect to Elders, both past and present.

 

Mami Katoka, Artistic Director

Internationally renowned curator Mami Kataoka is a key figure in analysing socio-historical and generational trends, particularly in the context of Japanese and Asian art, and frequently writes and lectures on contemporary art in Asia.

She has held the position of Chief Curator of the Mori Art Museum (MAM) in Tokyo since 2009, and Senior Curator since 2003. At MAM, Kataoka has curated numerous notable exhibitions including ‘Roppongi Crossing’ (survey show of contemporary Japanese art) (2004, 2013), ‘Sensing Nature: Perception of Nature in Japan’ (2010); as well as major survey shows of prominent artists in Asia such as Tsuyoshi Ozawa, Ai Weiwei, Lee Bul, Makoto Aida, Lee Mingwei and N.S. Harsha.

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Performance x 4A

HONG KONG. 27 MARCH – 1 APRIL, 2018.

Venue: Art Central Hong Kong, 9 Lung Wo Road, Central, Hong Kong.

Building upon its critically acclaimed performance programme, Australia’s 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) returns to Art Central with a series of interactive and live works that address contemporary concerns of excess and dispossession. In an era characterised by polarities, and expansive disparity across societies, the pervasive sense of tension informs the thematic of the programme. Showcasing leading contemporary artists from across the Asia-Pacific region, the works respond directly to global unease through a series of daily on-site performances. Participating artists include: Caroline Garcia (Australia), FJ Kunting (Indonesia), Sam Lo (Singapore) as well as artist duo Sampson Wong & Lam Chi Fai (Hong Kong).

About the Artists and their Artworks: 

Sampson Wong and Lam Chi Fai’s new media installation, Pavilion for our living, contemplates the housing crisis currently affecting Hong Kong citizens. The installation invites participants to experience the micro-apartments that many Hong Kong citizens call home. Temporarily simulating one of these apartments within the art fair environs, the exhibition space becomes one of containment. Once inside the simulated space the viewer gains access to audio interviews with micro-apartment dwellers on how they navigate these literal spaces, along with the problems attached to living inside one of these homes.

Sampson Wong (b.1985) and Lam Chi Fai (b.1985) are Hong Kong based artists who have collaborated in art-making since 2010. Their collaborative works received the First Prize in Freedom Flower Awards, the Gold Award and Silver Award of ifva and were exhibited in the Hong Kong Museum of Art and the Slought Foundation. They have formed the Add Oil Team to focus on projects concerning creative activism, the collective were committedly practiced during Hong Kong‘s Umbrella Movement, and their projects have been recently exhibited in the 5th Asian Art Biennial.

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 5pm – 9pm

Tuesday 27th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

Wednesday 28th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

Thursday 29th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm & 5.30pm – 8pm

Friday 30th:12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm, 5.00pm – 6.30pm

Saturday 31st: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm, 5.00pm – 6.30pm

Sunday 1st: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

 

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Caroline Garcia’s The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures, references the seminal performances of Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Coco Fusco. Garcia’s work interrogates the anthropological phenomenon of the ‘ethnographic exhibition’, which has placed subaltern bodies on display in museums, zoos, circuses and theatres throughout history . Garcia develops and builds upon this concept in The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures where the artist’s cis-female, coloured body is encased within a vitrine, confronting degrees of politicisation, as her cultural identity and gender is put on show. The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures is a museographic dance installation that presents auto-ethnographic portraits of Garcia, bringing forth her Filipino ancestry. She engages in a durational dance ritual using a Nintendo Wii to examine the neocolonisation of popular culture and cultural tourism. Through repetition, this performance brings into question an individual’s stamina when facing expectations of cultural competence and visibility.

Caroline Garcia (b.1988) is a culturally promiscuous performance maker. She works across live performance and video through a hybridised aesthetic of cross-cultural dance, ritual practice, new media, and the sampling of popular culture and colonial imagery. In her work, Garcia centres peripheral bodies by adopting the role of shape shifter – sliding into the gaps between cultures, experiences of otherness, and timeless clichés of exotic femininity. Garcia has presented at Manila Biennale: OPENCITY2018 (Manila, Philippines), The Art Gallery of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia), Channels: The Australian Video Art Festival (Melbourne, Australia).

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Tuesday 27th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

Wednesday 28th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

Thursday 29th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Friday 30th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Saturday 31st: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Sunday 1st: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

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TALK and Goal: Strong Relationship, but first, talk! are two durational performances by Indonesian artist FJ Kunting. TALK is a durational exercise in the resistance of excess. The artist explores the struggle and the fight for his voice to be heard. Tethered to a contraption of tools and pipes he attempts to speak, however his speech is reduced to bubbles that, over time, envelop him. As exhaustion nears, the futility of his effort becomes apparent with the artist ceasing to struggle and the bubbles slowly disappear. In Kunting’s second performance, Goal: Strong Relationship, but first, talk, language remains the heart of all communication. Kunting examines the ebb and flow of conversation as two figures, faceless except for a spout, appear in a wordless discussion. Talk is reduced to a bubble exchange, with each figure conversing through a stream of bubbles. While infinitely playful, these performances reveal patterns of conversation, exchange and balance in relationships.

FJ Kunting (b.1982) is a Yogyakarta, Indonesian based artist who has been developing a performance practice since 2012. Widely regarded as one of Indonesia’s most exciting performers, Kunting is fundamentally interested in an examination of human relations and engagement. His live performances are durational and hypnotic.

Performance times: 

Tuesday 27th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Wednesday 28th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Thursday 29th: 11.30am – 12.15pm & 7.30pm – 8.15pm

Friday 30th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Saturday 31st: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Sunday 1st: 11.30am – 12.15pm

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Progress: The Game of Leaders, invites audiences to participate in a high-stakes game of imagined nation building. Artist Sam Lo poses the question: “Where will you be standing when the First World falls?” Working with giant Jenga blocks, participants are invited to prioritise and select the building blocks of their ideal society. In your nation, will economic progress be favoured over military spending? Higher standards of living or increasing globalisation? As players jockey for top position in the imaginary nation’s guidance, the structure grows more precarious and its foundations ever more compromised. The game can only end one way.

Sam Lo (b.1986), also known by the moniker SKL0, is a Singaporean contemporary artist whose work is heavily inspired by daily observations and research on the sociopolitical climate. In 2013 her practice was placed under scrutiny, following her 2013 arrest for vandalism and subsequent sentencing of 240 hours of community service, bringing issues such as public space, freedom of expression and activism to the fore.  Progress: The Game of Leaders was commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and premiered at MPavilion as part of Melbourne Festival, 2017.

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 7pm – 8pm

Tuesday 27th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Wednesday 28th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Thursday 29th: 1pm – 2.30pm & 6.30 pm -7.30pm

Friday 30th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Saturday 31st: 1pm – 2.30pm

Sunday 1st: 1pm – 2.30pm

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The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu & John Young Zerunge

YOUNG. 21 APRIL 2018.

Between November 1860 and September 1861 the New South Wales goldfields of Burrangong, near the present day township of Young, was the the site of Australia’s largest racially motivated riot. Rising antagonism over gold mining disparities and cultural habits saw trivial misunderstandings intensify into racial tensions that erupted into violence across the goldfields. Over 10 months, Chinese miners were subjected to threats, robbery and sustained acts of violence.This anti-Chinese sentiment had swept through the goldfields of Victoria in the 1850s and by the early 1860s had reached a flashpoint in New South Wales, provoking public opinion and debate. In Sydney, the NSW Parliament responded to the contention by passing legislation to restrict Chinese immigration and began, alongside Victoria and South Australia, to write the prelude to the White Australia Policy.

Informed by a series of residencies in Young and surrounding historical sites, Chinese-Australian artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge trace the events and repercussions of this period of civil disobedience. Supported by historian Dr Karen Schamberger, the artists’ research-led practice interweaves these accounts of history to create contemporary mediations that reflects upon the forces of identity, economics, race and otherness in Australia today. In April 2018 their creative investigations will be realised in Young. This collaborative history project will bear a legacy publication.

This exhibition is the first iteration of a four-part exhibition project. The second will be realised at 4A’s Haymarket home from June 29 – August 14, 2008, followed by a publication and then a public monument in Young.

YOU ARE INVITED. 

On Saturday April 21, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is leading a community event with Australian-Chinese artists John Young Zerunge and Jason Phu in response the to events of The Burrangong Affray, including the Lambing Flat Riots, 1860 -1861.

We invite the community of Young and the surrounding areas to join the artists as they create a tribute at Young Chinese Cemetary, Murrumburrah and Blackguard Gully, Young. At each site the artists will lead us in a ceremony of incense burning, offerings and ceremonial gestures to welcome good luck and banish the bad spirits of the past.

Join the artists as they mark each of they pay tribute to these sites and these historic events.

Date: Saturday 21 April 2018

Time and Location: 10am at Young Chinese Cemetary and 11:30am Blackguard Gully. Followed by an informal meeting with the artists.

Bring: Something that makes noise, a pot or a pan, a whistle, a recorder or a drum.

Contact and RSVP details: hello@4a.com.au or 9212 0380

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Jason Phu (b.1989, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Sydney) studied at COFA, Sydney graduating with honours in 2011 and NSCAD, Nova Scotia. He works across a range of mediums from installation, painting and sculpture where he traces the connections between the tradition of Chinese brush and ink painting and contemporary practice. His work has been informed by several China based residencies at CAFA, Beijing; DAC Studios, Chongqing; and Organhaus, Chongqing which has enabled him to further investigate the tradition of calligraphy. Recently Jason has had numerous solo exhibitions in Australia including Westspace, Melbourne; Nicholas Projects, Melbourne; CCAS Gorman Arts Centre, Canberra; and ALASKA PROJECTS, Sydney. He won the coveted Sulman Prize in 2015 and in the same year received a Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship which allowed him to develop his practice between China and Australia.

John Young Zerunge (b.1956, Hong Kong; lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) started his artistic practice in the 1980s with writings on conceptualism and post-modernism. Within four-decades of artistic production, Young’s oeuvre has seen various transformations within his practice of painting and installation. In the last decade his work has focused on two strands, Abstract Paintings and historical re-imaginings in the form of the History Projects; starting with Bonhoeffer in Harlem (Berlin, Bamberg) then in the last five years, projects based on the history of the Chinese Diaspora in Australia since 1840. Retrospectives of his work have been held at the TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria in 2005 and Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University Canberra in 2013 and he has been included in major exhibitions in the likes of New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Berlin.

Dr Karen Schamberger (b.1980, Australia. Lives and works in Canberra, Australia) researches and writes about Australian museums, migration and cultural diversity. Her thesis ‘Identity, belonging and cultural diversity in Australian museums’ (2016) examined the way that objects mediate relations between people of culturally diverse backgrounds in Australian history and society, as well as the roles that museums play in these relations. One of her thesis case studies traced the biography of the ‘Roll-Up No Chinese’ banner created during the 1860-61 Lambing Flat riots and now held by the Lambing Flat Folk Museum in Young, NSW.
She currently works at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as part of the curatorial team developing a new environmental history gallery.  She has previously worked in curatorial roles on the ‘Identity: Yours, Mine Ours’ exhibition (2011) at the Immigration Museum, Melbourne and the ‘Australian Journeys’ gallery (2009) at the National Museum of Australia. 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body

The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu & John Young Zerunge

SYDNEY. 29 JUNE – 12 AUGUST 2018.

Between November 1860 and September 1861 the New South Wales goldfields of Burrangong, near the present day township of Young, was the the site of Australia’s largest racially motivated riot. Rising antagonism over gold mining disparities and cultural habits saw trivial misunderstandings intensify into racial tensions that erupted into violence across the goldfields. Over 10 months, Chinese miners were subjected to threats, robbery and sustained acts of violence.This anti-Chinese sentiment had swept through the goldfields of Victoria in the 1850s and by the early 1860s had reached a flashpoint in New South Wales, provoking public opinion and debate. In Sydney, the NSW Parliament responded to the contention by passing legislation to restrict Chinese immigration and began, alongside Victoria and South Australia, to write the prelude to the White Australia Policy.

Through a series of residencies in Young and surrounding historical sites, Chinese-Australian artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge trace the events and repercussions of this period of civil disobedience. Supported by historian Dr Karen Schamberger, the artists’ research-led practice interweaves these accounts of history to create contemporary mediations that reflects upon the forces of identity, economics, race and otherness in Australia today. This collaborative history project will bear a legacy publication.

This exhibition is the second iteration of a four-part exhibition project. The first was be realised in Young in April. 2018.

Jason Phu (b.1989, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Sydney) studied at COFA, Sydney graduating with honours in 2011 and NSCAD, Nova Scotia. He works across a range of mediums from installation, painting and sculpture where he traces the connections between the tradition of Chinese brush and ink painting and contemporary practice. His work has been informed by several China based residencies at CAFA, Beijing; DAC Studios, Chongqing; and Organhaus, Chongqing which has enabled him to further investigate the tradition of calligraphy. Recently Jason has had numerous solo exhibitions in Australia including Westspace, Melbourne; Nicholas Projects, Melbourne; CCAS Gorman Arts Centre, Canberra; and ALASKA PROJECTS, Sydney. He won the coveted Sulman Prize in 2015 and in the same year received a Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship which allowed him to develop his practice between China and Australia.

John Young Zerunge (b.1956, Hong Kong; lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) started his artistic practice in the 1980s with writings on conceptualism and post-modernism. Within four-decades of artistic production, Young’s oeuvre has seen various transformations within his practice of painting and installation. In the last decade his work has focused on two strands, Abstract Paintings and historical re-imaginings in the form of the History Projects; starting with Bonhoeffer in Harlem (Berlin, Bamberg) then in the last five years, projects based on the history of the Chinese Diaspora in Australia since 1840. Retrospectives of his work have been held at the TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria in 2005 and Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University Canberra in 2013 and he has been included in major exhibitions in the likes of New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Berlin.

Dr Karen Schamberger (b.1980, Australia. Lives and works in Canberra, Australia) researches and writes about Australian museums, migration and cultural diversity. Her thesis ‘Identity, belonging and cultural diversity in Australian museums’ (2016) examined the way that objects mediate relations between people of culturally diverse backgrounds in Australian history and society, as well as the roles that museums play in these relations. One of her thesis case studies traced the biography of the ‘Roll-Up No Chinese’ banner created during the 1860-61 Lambing Flat riots and now held by the Lambing Flat Folk Museum in Young, NSW.

She currently works at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as part of the curatorial team developing a new environmental history gallery.  She has previously worked in curatorial roles on the ‘Identity: Yours, Mine Ours’ exhibition (2011) at the Immigration Museum, Melbourne and the ‘Australian Journeys’ gallery (2009) at the National Museum of Australia. 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body

 

Exhibition documentation

 

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John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. Jason Phu, Do not stick your hand in the fire, sit near it and observe the stars, 2018, framed editioned photograph on paper, 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, framed digital photographic series on paper, 2 works, each work 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, The Field, 2018, HD video, 8.05 minutes. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, objects from the performance Action: Covering at Blackguard Gully, Young, 21.04.2018: metal bucket, spade, felt blankets. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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John Young Zerunge, The Field, 2018, HD video, 8.05 minutes, installation view. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, Do not stick your hand in the fire, sit near it and observe the stars, 2018, framed editioned photograph on paper, 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, framed digital photographic series on paper, 2 works, each work 1212 x 812mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Installation view, clockwise, from left:
Jason Phu, ROLLING ROLLS ROLLED ROLL, 2018, ink on sheet, dimensions variable, 4 works, each work 1200 x 1200mm. John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Installation view, clockwise, from left:
Jason Phu, ROLLING ROLLS ROLLED ROLL, 2018, ink on sheet, dimensions variable, 4 works, each work 1200 x 1200mm. John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, installation view, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm, commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.

Temporary Certainty

SYDNEY. 31 AUGUST – 14 OCTOBER 2018.


Rushdi Anwar 

Alana Hunt 
Sarker Protick 

Temporary Certainty is shaped by an investigation of sudden shifts of historical change wrought by complex interventions in the greater Asia region. Showcasing new works from Australian artists Rushdi Anwar and Alana Hunt alongside a new body of work from Sarker Protick, this exhibition brings together three distinct voices that share long-standing commitments to humanitarian and activist concerns. With a focus on Bengal, Kurdistan and the Kimberley region of Western Australia, Temporary Certainty explores how artists approach geography as a marker of the consequences of broader geopolitical expediencies.

The three distinct geographical contexts represented in this exhibition, each with their seemingly disparate environmental challenges and contingencies, are here connected by the way the artists have explored questions of nationalisms, the legacies of sovereignty, and contested narratives of memorialisation. Equally defined by more urgent concerns and experiences of displacement and transience, the works presented in Temporary Certainty are distinguished by their emergence within conditions of uneasy reconciliation. Additionally, a common thread between each artist’s vision across the works presented in this exhibition is the central importance of the photographic image as a medium that excels at mediating between space and time, reality and illusion. The artists utilise this visual language, alongside other mediums and methodologies, in a shared pursuit of seeking to unveil the symbolic resonances that inhabit built environments within fractured contexts.

Alana Hunt’s activities as an artist are defined by her commitment to broadening and challenging the possibilities of communicating ideas in the public realm. For Temporary Certainty, Hunt has created a new work, Faith in a pile of stones (2018), that takes as its focus Lake Argyle. Located near the artist’s home in the town of Kununurra, Lake Argyle was constructed in 1971 (and filled by 1974), following the damming of the Ord River. An immense human-engineered reservoir of freshwater whose capacity is more than eighteen times the volume of Sydney Harbour, its construction for the purpose of irrigation for agricultural production drowned places of significance and altered the ecologies of country belonging primarily to Miriwoong, but also Gija and Malgnin people. Hunt reconfigures the monumental aspect of the dam wall in a work that explores the convergence of the bureaucratic management of natural resources driven by colonial dreams of development that have been shaped by faith in the idea of permanence.

Rushdi Anwar presents two works that are deeply related to the artist’s experiences as a member of the Kurdish diaspora. The video and sound installation Facing Living: The Past in the Present (2015) shows a pair of hands that proceed to tear up and piece back together an official portrait of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein until the image is overwhelmed by black adhesive tape, an act that balances between destruction and creation, erasure and elegy for those who suffered under Hussein’s rule. We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire (2018) is the artist’s response to his recent experience of entering a church in the town of Bashiqa located in north east Mosul, part of disputed territories between the Kurdistan Regional Government and Iraqi government. This work explores unsettling similarities between the destruction, transience and renewal faced by displaced and uprooted communities globally and the built environments they are forced to leave.

Sarker Protick’s Exodus (2015–ongoing) considers the expediencies of decolonisation while at the same time being a haunting meditation on the universal contingencies of time. Over a selection of photographs and moving image, the artist explores the decaying buildings and surrounding lands of the feudal estates in East Bengal that were previously owned by Hindu jamindars, or landlords. Following the Liberation War of 1971 that abruptly established the newly independent nation of Bangladesh, huge migrations took place across Bengal. This saw wealthy Hindu landowners abandon their estates for India in fear of the kind of violent reprisals that had erupted following the Partition of India in 1947, while at the same time many Muslims fled West Bengal heading east. A series of controversial laws dating from 1948, culminating in the Vested Property Act of 1974, allowed the confiscation of property by Bangladeshi authorities from groups declared ‘enemies of the state’. Since then, these estates have commonly been left in disrepair, taken over by nature and appropriated by local villagers—another chapter in a landscape indelibly marked by the influence of Mughal rule and British imperialism (1).

Grappling with tensions between certainty and doubt, permanence and all that is ephemeral, Temporary Certainty contemplates the value of what can be apprehended—much less held onto—with any guarantee in an age lurching towards ever greater polarisation.

Temporary Certainty is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Rushdi Anwar’s commissioned work has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body. The presentation of Sarker Protick’s Exodus has been supported by The Esplanade, Singapore, with additional support from the Australian Centre for Photography.

(1) Sarker Protick’s Exodus was internationally premiered in the exhibition The Life of Things at The Esplanade, Singapore, from 19 January to 8 April 2018. This text incorporates aspects of curator Sam I-shan’s accompanying text for this exhibition. 


Artists:

Rushdi Anwar (b. Halabja, Kurdistan) is a Melbourne-based artist, currently working between Australia and Thailand. His installation, sculpture, painting, photo-painting and video work often reflect on socio-political issues relating to Kurdistan, Iraq and the Middle East. He explores these issues through an investigation of form, utilising a material vocabulary and different processes of making. Anwar was educated in Kurdistan and Australia, studying at the Institute of Kirkuk- Kurdistan and Enmore Design Centre/Sydney Institute. He holds a Master of Fine Art (2010) and a PhD in Fine Art (2016) from RMIT University, Melbourne. He has held solo and group exhibitions widely in Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Kurdistan, Norway, Switzerland, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and USA. Recent and upcoming exhibitions include 12th Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2018), and the 13th Havana Biennial, Cuba (2019). Anwar’s works are held in the collections of the Australian War Memorial, the Kurdistan Regional Government, and in private collections. He has curated exhibitions in Kurdistan (2010), Thailand (2012, 2015), and Australia (2013). Following several artist-in-residence programs in Thailand, he co-founded and co-coordinated the Australian Thai Artist Interchange, Melbourne (2012–2016), an organisation founded to enhance cross-cultural exchange, awareness and appreciation of art and culture between Thais and Australians. Rushdi is a founding member, with Brook Andrew and Shiraz Bayjoo, of the artist collective The Working Collection.

Alana Hunt (b. 1984, Sydney) makes contemporary art, writes and produces culture through a variety of media across public, gallery and online spaces. She lives on Miriwoong country in the north-west of Australia and has a long-standing engagement with South Asia. The politics of nation making and the colonial past and present of Australia and South Asia are central to her practice. Since 2009, she has orchestrated participatory art and publishing projects that have activated different media forms in the public sphere to shed light on Kashmir. Paper txt msgs from Kashmir (2009–2011) prompted media in India and Pakistan to speak about a state-wide mobile phone ban they had previously been silent on. This work won the Fauvette Laureiro Artist Scholarship. In 2016, the seven-year participatory memorial Cups of nun chai circulated as a newspaper serial in Kashmir, reaching thousands of people on a weekly basis during a period of civilian uprising and state oppression. This work won the 2017 Incinerator Art Award. Her essay, A mere drop in the sea of what is, published by 4A Papers (Issue 1, November 2016), explored the art circulating on the ‘streets of social media’ in Kashmir and made it into the Hansard Report of the Australian Parliament. In 2018, Alana undertook a residency in Sulawesi with Rumata Art Space & the Makassar International Writers’ Festival and will present Cups of nun chai at Tufts University Art Gallery, Massachusetts, and a series of artists presentations at Tufts, Brown, and Parsons universities. Her work is held in both public and private collections including Artbank and the Macquarie Group Collection.

Sarker Protick (b. 1986, Bangladesh) is a Dhaka-based artist whose work explores the possibilities of time, light and sound. His portraits, landscapes and photographic series engage philosophically with the specificities of personal and national histories. Sarker’s approach across various mediums incorporates detailed observations and subtle gestures as a means of creating personal spaces, often minimal and atmospheric. He was named in British Journal of Photography’s annual ‘Ones to Watch’ and Photo District News’ (PDN) 30 emerging photographers of the year. Sarker is the recipient of Joop Swart Masterclass, World Press Photo award, and Australian Photobook of the Year grand prize. His body of work Exodus was awarded the Magnum Foundation Grant 2018. Sarker’s work has been shown in museums, galleries and photo festivals internationally, including Art Dubai; Paris Photo; Singapore Art Week; Dhaka Art Summit; Chobi Mela International Photography Festival, Dhaka; Latvian Contemporary Museum of Photography, Riga; and Noorderlicht International Photofestival, Netherlands. Sarker is a faculty member at Pathshala South Asian Media Institute, Dhaka, and currently represented by East Wing Gallery, Dubai.

 

Exhibition Documentation

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Installation view of Temporary Certainty a t 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, clockwise left to right: Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (f rom the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photographs (selection of 19); 22.5 x 28.0 cm (each photograph); courtesy the artist. Sarker Protick, Arrival (from the series Exodus) , 2015–ongoing, single-channel HD video and sound installation; 8:00 mins; courtesy the artist. Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (from the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photograph; 127.0 x 101.5 cm; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski


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Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (from the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photographs (selection of 19); 22.5 x 28.0 cm (each photograph); courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Installation view of Temporary Certainty a t 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, left to right: Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses

SYDNEY. 2 NOVEMBER – 16 DECEMBER 2018.

All Blessings, All Curses presents recent and newly commissioned works by Sydney-based artist, Justine Youssef. Born in the heart of Western Sydney, Youssef’s practice negates the stifling white heat of global xenophobia with deeply personal and universal ruminations that layer the smell, sights and textures of her ancestral homeland, Lebanon.

The strength of Justine Youssef’s practice lies in the poetics of her storytelling and observations: a teacher blackens Arabic script, fearing that it contains a religious hate message; a smoke detector deafeningly sounds as a mother burns bakhoor to rid the house of the evil eye; the looks of confusion two girls receive as they scrub clean a Persian rug in their driveway. These scenes represent the lived experience of the artist who transforms everyday occurrences into visual metaphors.

Justine Youssef’s intuitive methodology draws upon this archive of personal memories as a departure point for All blessing, all curses. Employing sculpture, video, installation and text, Youssef examines the difficult experiences of misunderstanding with the grand subjects of faith, love, family and home. In doing so, she creates immersive experiences that are both epic and intimate – whispering invocations of promise, comfort and resistance.

Justine Youssef (b. 1992) is currently living on the unceded territory of the Darug peoples. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art from the National Art School, Sydney, Australia and is currently working from the Parramatta Artist Studios. She has been awarded the New South Wales Artists’ Grant (NAVA and Create NSW), as well as a studio residency at Blacktown Arts. She has held collaborative solo exhibitions at Seventh Gallery, Melbourne, and Firstdraft, Woolloomooloo with Duha Ali in 2018, and has participated in group exhibitions at Airspace Projects, Marrickville; Bankstown Art Center, Bankstown; Sullivan+Strumpf, Zetland; and Collab Gallery, Chippendale. Her work can be found in the collections of the National Association for the Visual Arts; the National Art School Drawing Archive; and the Sydney Gallery School.

Exhibition Documentation

All images: Kai Wasikowski

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Exterior view of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, In gallery interior: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, dimensions variable, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, dimensions variable, Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Left: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Right: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.
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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_17

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_18

Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_19

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_20

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. 

justine_youssef_documentation_21

Front left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_22

Front left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_23

Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_24

Front right: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_25

Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_26

Centre Front: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Middle Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_27

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_28

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_29

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_30

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_31

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_32

Front: Justine Youssef and Leila El Rayes, Burying that which binds into the chest of my beloved, 2018, photographic documentation (of single channel video, 6 minutes), 2 photographs, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

justine_youssef_documentation_33

Front: Justine Youssef and Leila El Rayes, Burying that which binds into the chest of my beloved, 2018, photographic documentation (of single channel video, 6 minutes), 2 photographs, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

 

4A x Para Site at VOLUME 2017 | Another Art Book Fair

Friday 13 – Sunday 15 October, 2017
VOLUME 2017 | Another Art Book Fair
Artspace

Artspace, in partnership with Printed Matter, Inc., New York and Perimeter Books, Melbourne, presents VOLUME 2017 | Another Art Book Fair. The second edition of this biennial event will take place from 13 – 15 October at Artspace.

Artspace will welcome 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art x Para Site, alongside over 70 fellow exhibitors from across Australia and the world, including Amsterdam, Hong Kong, South Korea, Colombia, France and the United States. In addition to an international line up of publishers, artists, collectives, galleries and distributors, there will be a free program of talks, artist-led workshops, book launches, readings and performances.

Fair Dates & Hours
Friday 13 October | Doors Open 3pm; Launch 6 – 9pm
Saturday 14 & Sunday 15 October | 11am – 6pm

Para Site is Hong Kong’s leading contemporary art centre and one of the oldest and most active independent art institutions in Asia. It produces exhibitions, publications, discursive, and educational projects aimed at forging a critical understanding of local and international phenomena in art and society.

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) is an independent not-for-profit organisation based in Sydney, Australia. 4A fosters excellence and innovation in contemporary culture through the commissioning, presentation, documentation and research of contemporary art. Our program is presented throughout Australia and Asia , where we ensure that contemporary art plays a central role in understanding and developing the dynamic relationship between Australia and the wider Asian region.

Feminist South September Reading Group

  • 6.00PM – 7.00PM, Thursday 28 September 2017
  • ‘Feminism is a Western Concept: a reading group’
  • 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
  • 181-187 Hay St, Haymarket NSW

In partnership with Feminist South, 4A is pleased to host the monthly Feminist South reading group on the last Thursday of the month. This reading group is Phase 1 of the Feminist South research and curatorial project led by Kelly Doley and i:project space, Beijing.

Feminist South is a curatorial project and research platform spanning across 2017-2019 that aims to generate critical dialogue around contemporary feminist performance practice in the context of the Asia Pacific.

Rather than attempting to fit Western feminist theories and movements onto the multiplicities that make up practice in the Asia Pacific, the project seeks to create its own terms of reference in order to decentre and disrupt the conventional understandings of feminist art and create new narratives for practices that are located in the here and now.

All welcome, please join the discussion. Email kellydoley@gmail.com to join the Feminist South mailing list and RSVP.

 

Readings for September:

Lo, Jacqueline. “Australia’s Other Asia in the Asian Century.” In Contemporary Asian Art and Exhibitions: Connectivities and World-making, by Antoinette Michelle and Turner Caroline, 219-32. ANU Press, 2014.
http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13wwv81.15?refreqid=excelsior%3Ad6002aceba5aed334054e299781ab4f4&seq=3#page_scan_tab_contents

Erickson, Britta. ‘The Rise of a Feminist Spirit in Contemporary Chinese Art’, Art AsiaPacific, Issue 31, 2001, 65–71

https://library.artasiapacific.com/articles/1956

NIGHT CAP WITH HAHAN X 4A: VVVVVVVVVIP PARTY FOR EVERYONE

FRIDAY 8 SEPTEMBER
9:00 PM – 12:00 AM

Sydney Contemporary ticket holders
Location: The Old Clare Hotel, Chippendale

Where you will you will party like a VIP

Step through the velvet ropes and into the Old Clare

At this party hosted by international speculative superstar Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, you’ll be showered in gold, mix with the glitterati, and drink only the finest.

Secret password required.

 

Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Project 11. 4A would like to thank Project 11 for their generous support of this project.

PROJECT11LOGO

Congee Breakfast Tour – I don’t want to be there when it happens

SYDNEY – 7 OCTOBER – 10.30AM – 12.30PM

Join 4A Assistant Curator Micheal Do for a tour of I don’t want to be there when it happens, followed by a congee breakfast.

I don’t want to be there when it happens brings together artists who explore the psychology of contemporary trauma. Recent works by Raj Kumar, Sonia Leber & David Chesworth and Adeela Suleman all confront the larger socio-political realities of Pakistan in the era of contemporary warfare. Through video and installation, the artists address the experience of the individual in the midst of a continuous state of war. By scanning the landscape with nonsensical logic, futilely seeking to document destruction, and questioning the appropriation of religion, the artworks in the exhibition avoid resolution and closure. Instead, they highlight the individual’s inability to comprehend the expansive uncertainty of combat, and the impossibilities of representing the trauma of conflict.

Please Explain: Fear of small numbers and the geography of anger

SYDNEY
Tue 19 September 2017
6-8PM
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
Free
Moderator: Associate Professor Phillip GEORGE
Speakers: Abdul Rahman ABDULLAH, Mehwish IQBAL, Khaled SABSABI and Nur SHEKEMBI.

 Join 4A for the first event in 4A’s new series Please Explain that invite presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. In the inaugural series, co-curated by Nur Shkembi and Mikala Tai, the Australian Muslim experience is front and centre with thought provoking discussions on feminism, fantasy, politics and racism and features members of the collective Eleven.

The first panel, Please Explain: Fear of small numbers and the geography of anger, brings together artists Abdul Rahman Abdullah, Khaled Sabsabi and Mehwish Iqbal with academics and curators Nur Shkembi and Associate Professor Philip George. Taking cues from Arjun Appadurai’s Fear of Small Numbers. An Essay on the Geography of Anger, artistic practice and academic work are considered in light of the questions Appadurai raises about the darker side of globalisation and multiculturalism.

Feminist South July Reading Group

  • 5.30PM – 6.30PM, Thursday 27 July 2017
  • ‘Feminism is a Western Concept: a reading group’
  • 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
  • 181-187 Hay St, Haymarket NSW

In partnership with Feminist South, 4A is pleased to host the monthly Feminist South reading group on the last Thursday of the month. This reading group is Phase 1 of the Feminist South research and curatorial project led by Kelly Doley and i:project space, Beijing.

Feminist South is a curatorial project and research platform spanning across 2017-2019 that aims to generate critical dialogue around contemporary feminist performance practice in the context of the Asia Pacific.

Rather than attempting to fit Western feminist theories and movements onto the multiplicities that make up practice in the Asia Pacific, the project seeks to create its own terms of reference in order to decentre and disrupt the conventional understandings of feminist art and create new narratives for practices that are located in the here and now.

All welcome, please join the discussion. Email kellydoley@gmail.com to join the Feminist South mailing list and RSVP.

The Feminist South reading for July is:

  • Article complicating the narrative that contemporary art was bestowed upon China by the West: Carol Yinghua Lu, ‘Accidental Conceptualism’, eflux Journal #01 – December 2008

http://www.e-flux.com/journal/70/60556/from-the-anxiety-of-participation-to-the-process-of-de-internationalization/

  • Wu Tsang discussing working in Asia as a queer trans identified artist and the use of ‘Western’ terms: ‘Wu Tsang A Life in Process’, Leap Magazine, No. 38 19 May 2016 by Stephanie Bailey

http://www.leapleapleap.com/2016/05/wu-tsang-a-life-in-process/

  • Bringing it back to the Australian context: ‘Does feminism speak for all women?’, Lia Incognita, 23 July 2013, Peril Asian Australian Arts and Culture

http://peril.com.au/topics/politics/does-feminism-speak-for-all-women/

Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition

Presented as part of Sydney Contemporary – 7 – 10 September 2017 

Is there something truly universal nowadays, when human conception about value has been influenced by many factors and layered dimensions? What is more valuable when all of this factors and dimensions are detached? The answer then refers to “time”. Hahan observes that human’s process, actions, opportunities, predictions, and hopes cannot be separated from time.

Join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Hahan at Sydney Contemporary 2017 for your chance to become part of an experimental art market in Speculative Entertainment No. 1 Sydney Edition.

Speculative Entertainment No.1” is an ongoing project that developed from Hahan’s experiments about time and privilege, as well as an interest to experiment with the art market and use it as medium. This work is intended to hack the art market, and particularly to hack the artwork collecting system which usually limited. This work was initially exhibited during ARTJOG 9 (2016), an annual artist-based art fair in Yogyakarta, and has also been presented in conjunction with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian art at Art Central Hong Kong (2017).

This work consists of a 7.5 m x 2.6 m painting which is divided into 1,619 square lots. Each lot is sized 10 cm square and the price for each lot is twice the entrance fee of the art fair. During the exhibition period at scheduled time, the audience can become “collectors” with the same opportunities, hopes, privileges, and speculations by choosing any lot they want at the venue. The audience members who purchase the lot(s) are encouraged to speculate by re-selling it according to their own speculative price and Hahan, as the artist, will charge 10% commission from the selling.

 

About the artist:

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan (1983, Kebumen, Indonesia) lives and works in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. Hahan’s art making is concerned with the tussle between ‘high art’ and ‘low art’, blurring realism with decoration. Hahan incorporates film, music and street culture into a distinct visual language, creating a sense of movement and spontaneity in what can be described as a topsy-turvy reality steeped in satirical humor. In recent years, he attempts to display an art with the concept that emphasises the interaction with the visitors and relate it with the development of art in global as well as its society. He also one of the founders of Ace House Collective, a young artists’ collective and initiative space based in Yogyakarta which trying to capture the culture of Indonesian contemporary society through multidiscipline work process, collaboration, and research.His works have been collected by several art museum including Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) Brisbane, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Melbourne, Australia.

 

Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Project 11. 4A would like to thank Project 11 for their generous support of this project.

PROJECT11LOGO

 

Documentation:

 

4a17_scaf_hahan_03

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

4a17_scaf_hahan_06

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

4a17_scaf_hahan_15

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

4a17_scaf_hahan_20

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

4a17_scaf_hahan_17

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

4a17_scaf_hahan_21

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

Symposium – When South is North: contemporary art and culture in South Asia and Australia

SYDNEY. 16 AUG 2017.

 

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, in association with the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University, presents:

When South is North:  contemporary art and culture in South Asia and Australia

Wednesday 16th August, 2017

1 PSQ (1 Parramatta Square), Western Sydney University
169 Macquarie Street,
Parramatta City

Free, registrations required.

 

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University invite you to join us for 4A’s 2017 symposium, When South is North: contemporary art and culture in South Asia and Australia.

With local and international speakers drawn from all over South Asia, this symposium is led by artists, cultural commentators, scholars and grass-roots workers who understand the real issues which affect art and culture from the region.  With keynote presentations from artists Adeela Suleman (Pakistan) and Reena Kallat (India) and curator and Director Vidya Shivadas (India)– plus a wide range of Australian-based artists, academics, politicians, community workers and more – When South is North aims to build dialogue around South Asia and Australia in a contemporary arts context.

The focus of the day will be on question-making, debate and discussion – focusing on the hows and whys within the region’s contemporary art and cultural landscapes.

 

A day-long symposium, this event is free to attend, but RSVPs are required as catering will be included for all registered attendees.

 

When South is North – Symposium Schedule:


9.00 – 10.00    Registration 


10.00 – 10.15  Welcome

| Prof. Paul JAMES, Western Sydney University, Director, Institute of Society and Culture

| Dr. Mikala TAI, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art


10.00 – 10.30  Opening Presentation

 | Speaker: Associate Professor Devleena GHOSH

| Associate Professor Devleena Ghosh of the University of Technology, Sydney, sets the tone for the day, discussing her fields of research in colonial, postcolonial, environmental and global studies, specifically in the Indian Ocean region.


10.30AM – 11.30AM Focus Presentation

 | Speaker: Reena KALLAT (India)

Session supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.

| Reena Kallat’s practice spans drawing, photography, sculpture and video and engages diverse materials, imbued with conceptual underpinnings. She has widely exhibited at institutions across the world such as Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), New York; Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; Vancouver Art Gallery; Saatchi Gallery, London;  Helsinki City Art Museum, Finland; National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul; Casa Asia, Madrid and Barcelona; Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney;  Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai;  amongst many others.  Here, Kallat discusses her practice and experiences of working across cultural boundaries.


11.30AM – 1.00PM Panel 1 – Art in, of, from, South Asia? Artists working across cultures and geographies.

 | Moderator: Pedro DE ALMEIDA

| Speakers: Reena KALLAT (India), Ramesh Mario NITHIYENDRAN, Nusra Latif QURESHI, Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan) and Abdullah M.I SYED

Session supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.

| The politics and geography of South Asia are neither neutral or exact. Artists from this region continue to undergo post-colonial cultural and political processes of national building, whereby issues of freedom of speech, national identity-making and economic forces continue to revise and re-invent art making practices and art historical study. Drawing together artists from across Australia and South Asia, this panel discusses artists’ experiences working within and outside South Asian contexts in contemporary art.


1.00PM – 2.30PM Lunch Break/Networking/Parramatta Artist Studios Visit

Thanks to the generous support of the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney, lunch will be provided for all registered attendees from 1PM. From 1.30PM, attendees are invited to attend our optional Parramatta Artists Studios tour:

1.30 – 2.30pm: Parramatta Artists Studios: Open Studios
2 Minute Walk from PS1
Level 1 & 2, 68 Macquarie St, Parramatta
Tour and artist talks with Marikit Santiago and Kalanjay Dhir begins at 1.45pm
Meet Parramatta Artists Studios artists and see works in progress from artists working across artistic disciplines. 2017 artists include Khadim Ali, Kate Beckingham, Penelope Cain, Emma Fielden, Annie McKinnon, Salote Tawale, Hannah Toohey, Cigdem Aydemir, Harriet Body, Kalanjay Dhir, Caroline Garcia, Anna McMahon, Marikit Santiago, Shireen Taweel and Garry Trinh.


2.30PM – 3.30PM Focus Presentation

 | Speaker: Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

|  Vidya Shivadas is the Director of the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art, and a curator based in New Delhi. After her Bachelors in Sociology from Delhi University and a Masters in Art Criticism from Faculty of Fine Arts, MS University of Baroda, she joined Vadehra Art Gallery in 2002. She has curated exhibitions at the Gallery which include Something I’ve been meaning to tell you (with Sunil Gupta), April 2011; Faiza Butt, Ruby Chishti, Masooma Syed (three Pakistani women artists), April 2009; Fluid Structures: Gender and Abstraction in India, April 2008; among others. In 2009, she was a guest curator at Devi Art Foundation and worked on the solo exhibition of Bangladeshi artist Mahbubur Rahman. In 2007, she was invited to participate in the educational programming for Documenta 12 from May to September 2007 in Kassel, Germany.


3.30PM – 5.00PM Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia

 | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI

| Speakers: Sunil BADAMI, Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

Through census data, in 2011, close to 1 million Australians identified as of South Asian background. This panel will explore the work of prominent organisations and institutions who have made significant impacts on South Asian art and culture in Australia. Our panelists, with backgrounds encompassing policy-making, community arts, literature and media, will unpack what guides cultural decision making and how these decisions impact history, artistic output and authenticity.


5.00PM – 6.00PM Networking drinks

Thanks to the generous support of the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney, drinks will be provided for all registered attendees.


6.00PM – 6.45PM Keynote Presentation

 | Speaker: Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan)

With an introduction from Phillip KEIR. The Keir Foundation has co-commissioned Adeela’s work as part of 4A’s associated exhibition, I don’t want to be there when it happens.

| Internationally regarded artist, coordinator of Vasl Artists’ Collective in Karachi, and Associate Professor and Head of the Fine Art Department at Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture, Adeela Suleman is a force to be reckoned with. In this keynote presentation, Suleman will discuss her experience as an artist, educator in Karachi, Pakistan and the violence and censorship she has encountered in her work.


 

6.45PM – 7.00PM Questions from the audience and concluding remarks

 | Speakers: Distinguished Professor Ien ANG, Western Sydney University, with Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan)

| Questions from the audience to Adeela Suleman will be moderated by and followed with concluding remarks and thank you from Distinguished Professor Ien Ang, Western Sydney University

 


SPEAKER LIST 

 | Professor Ien Ang

| Distinguished Professor Ien Ang is a Professor of Cultural Studies and was the founding Director of the Institute for Culture and Society. She is one of the leaders in cultural studies worldwide, with interdisciplinary work spanning many areas of the humanities and social sciences. Her books, including Watching Dallas, Desperately seeking the audience and On not speaking Chinese, are recognised as classics in the field and her work has been translated into many languages. Her current ARC research project is entitled Sydney’s Chinatown in the Asian Century: from Ethnic Enclave to Global Hub (with Donald McNeill and Kay Anderson in collaboration with the City of Sydney). She currently chairs an Expert Working Group on Asia Literacy: Language and Beyond, for the Australian Council of Learned Academies’ Securing Australia’s Future program. She complted her PhD, 1990, Social and Cultural Sciences, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, a Doctorandus/Mphil, 1982, Mass Communication, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Kandidaats/BA, 1977, Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

 | Sunil Badami

| Sunil Badami is a bon vivant, raconteur and flâneur. He’s also a writer, performer, academic and broadcaster. He’s written for publications including The Sydney Morning Herald, Good Weekend, The Australian, The Monthly, The New Daily, The Australian Literary Review, Australian Gourmet Traveller, Art and Australia, Seizure, Southerly, Westerly, Island and Meanjin, and his work has been published in anthologies in Australia and overseas, including in Best Australian Stories and Best Australian Essays.  In addition to regularly chairing and hosting launches, events and festivals, he’s appeared on stage at the Sydney and Melbourne Writers’ Festivals and the Belvoir Street and Griffin Theatres. He presented the national ABC Local Radio show Sunday Takeaway, and continues to appear regularly on ABC TV, ABC Local Radio, Double J and Radio National, where his documentary Riddle. Mystery. Enigma was nominated for the prestigious Prix Marulić. He was also the final Grand Champion of the long-running TV quiz show Sale of the Century. He’s currently editing his novel for publication.

 | Pedro de Almeida

| Pedro de Almeida has been program manager at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art since 2012. Pedro’s critical writing on art is published regularly, appearing in ArtAsiaPacific, Art Monthly Australasia, Broadsheet Journal, LEAP, Photofile and un Magazine among others. He is editor of 4A Papers, a newly established online platform for writing on contemporary art and culture in the Asia Pacific region, and is a member of Broadsheet Journal’s international editorial advisory board. Pedro recently participated in the Experimenter Curators’ Hub 2017, Kolkata, an annual platform for developing and sustaining discourse on curatorial practice and exhibition making through critical discussion and debate.

 | Melanie Eastburn

| Melanie Eastburn is Senior Curator of Asian art at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. From 2004 until 2016 she was Curator of Asian art at the National Gallery of Australia. Melanie has also worked at the National Museum of Cambodia in Phnom Penh, 2003-2004, and the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney 2001-2003. She was closely involved in negotiating the long-term loans to the NGA from the National Museum of Cambodia and has curated a number of exhibitions including: Glorious: earthly pleasures and heavenly realms, AGNSW, from May 2017; Time, light, Japan, AGNSW, December 2016 – May 2017; The story of Rama: Indian miniatures from the National Museum, New Delhi (coordinating curator; curator: Dr Vijay Mathur), NGA, 2015; Divine worlds: Indian painting, NGA, 2012; Black robe, white mist: art of the Japanese Buddhist nun Rengetsu, NGA, 2007; Fruits: Tokyo street style, Powerhouse Museum, 2002
  | Dr Mehreen Faruqi

| Dr Mehreen Faruqi joined the NSW Legislative Council in June 2013 and is the first Muslim woman elected to any Parliament in Australia. Prior to this she was the Director of the Institute of Environmental Studies at University of NSW and an Associate Professor in Business and Sustainability. She is a civil and environmental engineer with a PHD in Environmental Engineering. Since migrating from Pakistan to Australia in 1992, with her young family, Mehreen’s work has focused on developing real solutions to social and environmental challenges.

 | Amrit Gill

| Amrit Gill is Senior Manager, International Projects at the Australia Council for the Arts. Amrit has over 10 years’ experience in the Australian arts sector in community arts and cultural development, social enterprise, and international cultural relations. At the Australia Council she has managed the review of international residencies programs as well as the implementation of the Council’s first international arts strategy. Prior to joining the Australia Council, Amrit worked at Milk Crate Theatre, the British Council, and Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE). She holds a Bachelor of Art Theory/Arts from the University of New South Wales.

 | Devleena Ghosh

| Devleena Ghosh teaches in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Technology Sydney. She has researched and published widely on the cultural and political relationships between the British colonies of India and Australia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as well as on coal and climate change in India and Australia. She is the recipient of the WangGung Wu Award for best article (“Burma-Bengal Crossings: Intercolonial Relationships in Pre-Independence India”) in the Asian Studies Review in 2016.

 | Professor Paul James

| Professor Paul James is a professor of Globalisation and Cultural Diversity at Western Sydney University, and has been the Director of the Institute for Culture and Society since 2014. He is a social theorist and writes on topics related to globalisation, sustainability, social change and the human condition. Paul James has been an editor and author of roughly thirty books, most importantly he brought out a 16 volume series called ‘Central Currents in Globalization’, which maps all the older disciplnes in the social sciences and humanities. He is the Research Director for the international organisation Global Reconcilliation. He is on the Council of the Institute of Postcolonial Studies, Honary Professor at King’s College London, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts (London). He is editor of Arena Journal, as well as an editor/board-member of nine other international journals, including Globalizations and Global Governance. He completed his PhD, 1991, Ashworth Social Theory Centre, Department of History and Philosophy Science, University of Melbourne, and his BA (Hons), 1981, Department of Political Science, University of Melbourne.

| Reena Saini Kallat

| Reena Saini Kallat’s (b. 1973, Delhi, India) practice spans drawing, photography, sculpture and video engages diverse materials, imbued with conceptual underpinnings. She has widely exhibited at institutions across the world such as Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), New York; Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; Kennedy Centre, Washington; Vancouver Art Gallery; Saatchi Gallery, London; SESC Pompeia and SESC Belenzino, Sao Paulo; Helsinki City Art Museum, Finland; Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel; National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul; Casa Asia, Madrid and Barcelona; ZKM Karlsruhe, Germany; Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney; Hangar Bicocca, Milan; Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai; Chicago Cultural Centre amongst many others.  Her works are part of several public and private collections including the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taiwan; Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada; Initial Access (Frank Cohen Collection), UK; Fondazione Golinelli, Italy; Bhaudaji Lad Museum, Mumbai; National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi; Ermenegildo Zegna Group, Italy and Burger Collection, Hong Kong amongst others.

| Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran

| Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran (b. 1988 Colombo Sri-Lanka, Australia from 1989) Sri Lankan-born, Sydney-based artist Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran creates rough-edged, vibrant, new-age idols that are at once enticing and disquieting. He experiments with form and scale in the context of figurative sculpture to explore politics of sex, the monument, gender and religion. Formally trained in painting and drawing his practice has a sculptural emphasis which champions the physicality of art making. He has exhibited at various spaces and contexts including the Art Gallery of South Australia’s flagship exhibition, the 2016 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art and The National: New Australian Art 2017. He has presented solo exhibitions at the National Gallery of Australia, The Ian Potter Museum of Art and the Shepparton Art Museum. In 2014, Nithiyendran was awarded the 2014 NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (emerging) administered through Artspace. In 2015, he was the winner of the 2015 Sidney Myer Fund Australian Ceramic Award, Australia’s richest and premier award for artists working in the medium of ceramics. Forthcoming exhibitions include a solo presentation at the 2018 Dhaka Art Summit. His work is held in various collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of South Australia, Artbank, The Ian Potter Museum of Art and the Shepparton Art Museum.

 | Gary Paramanathan

| Gary Paramanathan works at the intersection of arts, culture and community. Currently working at AFTRS, he has previously worked at Fairfield City Council, Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE) and collaborated with a number of arts and cultural organisations. Gary Paramanathan was born in Sri Lanka. His foray into arts comes after completing a Bachelor of Commerce at The University of Sydney, and finding nothing amusing about a nine to five job. Gary is the founder and director of Colourfest Film Festival (2010-2017). He holds a Masters of International Communication from Macquarie University and also writes for the South Asian Australian blog southerncrossings.com.au. He hopes to please his brown parents someday by making lots of money and procuring a Dr. in front of his name.

 | Nusra Latif Qureshi

| Nusra Latif Qureshi – 1973; arrived Melbourne 2001; lives and works Melbourne. Nusra Latif Qureshi trained in Lahore in the Mughal miniature painting tradition and has developed an extraordinary contemporary painting practice that engages with the rich, visual histories of South Asia. Qureshi is recognized as an important member of a generation of Pakistani artists who have revived and innovated the traditional art of Mughal miniature painting. Qureshi lectured at the National School of Art in Lahore from 1995 to 1999, and immigrated to Australia in 2001 to take up postgraduate study. She has shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions across Asia, the United States, Europe and Australia.

| S. Shakthidharan

| Shakthi is the founder and artistic director of Western Sydney arts company CuriousWorks. His current projects are in partnership with, or have appeared at, Sydney Film Festival, Belvoir Theatre and Streaming Museum (New York). Shakthi was Associate Artist at Carriageworks from 2013-2015. In 2015 he was awarded the Phillip Parson’s Playwright Award from Belvoir Theatre and in 2011 the Kirk Robson by Australia Council for the Arts, given to an artist for their work in relation to social justice and community cultural leadership.

| Vidya Shivadas

| Vidya Shivadas is the Director of the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art, and a curator based in New Delhi. After her Bachelors in Sociology from Delhi University and a Masters in Art Criticism from Faculty of Fine Arts, MS University of Baroda, she joined Vadehra Art Gallery in 2002. She has curated exhibitions at the Gallery which include Something I’ve been meaning to tell you (with Sunil Gupta), April 2011; Faiza Butt, Ruby Chishti, Masooma Syed (three Pakistani women artists), April 2009; Fluid Structures: Gender and Abstraction in India, April 2008; among others. In 2009, she was a guest curator at Devi Art Foundation and worked on the solo exhibition of Bangladeshi artist Mahbubur Rahman. In 2007, she was invited to participate in the educational programming for Documenta 12 from May to September 2007 in Kassel, Germany.

| Adeela Suleman

| Adeela Suleman – Born 1970 in Karachi, Pakistan. Suleman studied Sculpture at the Indus Valley School of Art and completed a Master’s degree in International Relations from the University of Karachi. She is currently the Coordinator of Vasl Artists’ Collective in Karachi, in addition to being Associate Professor and Head of the Fine Art Department at Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture. Suleman has participated extensively with group and solo exhibitions worldwide, including Phantoms of Asia at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, the 2013 Asian Art Biennial at the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art, Hanging Fire – Contemporary Art from Pakistan at The Asia Society, New York; Gallery Rohtas 2, Lahore; Canvas Gallery, Karachi; Aicon Gallery, New York; and, the International Exhibition of Contemporary Art, Bologna, Italy (2008). Reviews and features of work appear in Artforum and the New York Times, among other publications. The artist lives and works in Karachi, Pakistan.

 | Dr. Abdullah M.I. Syed

| Dr. Abdullah M.I. Syed – (b. 1974, Karachi Pakistan) is a contemporary artist and designer working between Sydney, Karachi and New York. Trained in diverse disciplines, his art practice weaves religious, cultural and socio-political narratives of east and west, seamlessly knitting together art historical references and concerns from each. Syed holds a PhD in Art, Media and Design (2016) and a Master of Fine Arts (2009) from University of New South Wales, Sydney. Syed’s works have been featured in nine solo exhibitions and several national and international curated group exhibitions.

 | Dr. Mikala Tai

| Mikala Tai is a curator, researcher and academic specialising in contemporary Asian art and Australian design, who over the past decade has collaborated with local, national and international organisations to strengthen ties between Australia and Asia. Mikala currently sits on the board of BUS Projects, Melbourne. She is on the Chinese New Year Festival Advisory Panel, and is an Editorial Advisor for UnMagazine as well as a seasonal lecturer and tutor at The University of Melbourne. In 2006 Mikala completed her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) at the University of Melbourne and in early 2015 submitted her PhD at UNSW Art & Design examining the influence of the Global City on China’s local art infrastructure.

 

 

 

When South Is North would not be possible without the support of our project partners:

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When South is North: Contemporary Art and Culture in South Asia and Australia was a one-day symposium produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in association with the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University. Presented at 1 Parramatta Square, Western Sydney University campus, Parramatta, on 16 August 2017. The symposium was assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. Adeela Suleman’s participation in this symposium and 4A exhibition I don’t want to be there when it happens was supported by co-commissioning partner The Keir Foundation with further assistance from Sherman Foundation.

Symposium Documentation
All images: 4A’s Kai Wasikowski

 

| Prof. Paul JAMES, Western Sydney University, Director, Institute of Society and Culture

Prof. Paul JAMES, Western Sydney University, Director, Institute of Society and Culture

 

| Dr. Mikala TAI, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Dr. Mikala TAI, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

 

 Associate Professor Devleena GHOSH

Associate Professor Devleena GHOSH

 

Reena KALLAT (India)

Reena KALLAT (India)

 

Reena KALLAT (India)

Reena KALLAT (India)

 

Panel 1 – Art in, of, from, South Asia? Artists working across cultures and geographies. | Moderator: Pedro DE ALMEIDA | Speakers: Reena KALLAT (India), Ramesh Mario NITHIYENDRAN, Nusra Latif QURESHI, Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan) and Abdullah M.I SYED

Panel 1 – Art in, of, from, South Asia? Artists working across cultures and geographies. | Moderator: Pedro DE ALMEIDA | Speakers:
Reena KALLAT (India), Ramesh Mario NITHIYENDRAN, Nusra Latif QURESHI, Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan) and Abdullah M.I SYED

 

Parramatta Artist Studios visit as part of When South Is North

Marikit Santiago in her studio at Parramatta Artist Studios. Visit as part of When South Is North.

 

Parramatta Artist Studios visit as part of When South Is North

Kalanjay Dhir in his studio at Parramatta Artist Studios. Visit as part of When South Is North.

 

Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

 

Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

 

Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI | Speakers: Sunil BADAMI, Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI | Speakers: Sunil BADAMI,
Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

 

Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI | Speakers: Sunil BADAMI, Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI | Speakers: Sunil BADAMI, 
Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

 

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Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan)

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibition Opening: I don’t want to be there when it happens

Thursday, 17 August 2017

6.00pm to 8.00pm

SYDNEY.

Exhibition runs: 18 AUGUST – 8 OCTOBER 2017

I don’t want to be there when it happens brings together artists who explore the psychology of contemporary trauma. Recent works by Raj KumarSonia Leber & David Chesworth and Adeela Suleman all confront the larger socio-political realities of Pakistan in the era of contemporary warfare. Through video and installation, the artists address the experience of the individual in the midst of a continuous state of war. By scanning the landscape with nonsensical logic, futilely seeking to document destruction, and questioning the appropriation of religion, the artworks in the exhibition avoid resolution and closure. Instead, they highlight the individual’s inability to comprehend the expansive uncertainty of combat, and the impossibilities of representing the trauma of conflict.

I don’t want to be there when it happens presents truth as a precarious oscillation between fiction and reality. The artists resist literal or documentary approaches to their subjects, relying instead on speculative, symbolic, ambiguous and unstable modes of representation. In doing so, they emphasise how the individual’s attempts to understand and comprehend the reality of contemporary conflict are equally characterised by uncertainty and irresolvability. I don’t want to be there when it happens also seeks to acknowledge and present a multiplicity of perspectives on the ongoing conflicts in Pakistan and its region—perspectives which are all too easily overlooked or obscured by Western media and political interests.

 

Curated by Kate Warren and Mikala Tai.

 

Image: Adeela Suleman (2017) I don’t want to be there when it happens. Courtesy the artist.

 

Adeela Suleman’s work to be shown in I don’t want to be there when it happens has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and The Keir Foundation.

Presented in collaboration with:

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Feminist South June Reading Group

  • 6.00PM – 7.30PM, Thursday 29 June 2017
  • ‘Feminism is a Western Concept: a reading group’
  • 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
  • 181-187 Hay St, Haymarket NSW

In partnership with Feminist South, 4A is pleased to host the monthly Feminist South reading group on the last Thursday of the month. This reading group is Phase 1 of the Feminist South research and curatorial project led by Kelly Doley and i:project space, Beijing.

Feminist South is a curatorial project and research platform spanning across 2017-2019 that aims to generate critical dialogue around contemporary feminist performance practice in the context of the Asia Pacific.

Rather than attempting to fit Western feminist theories and movements onto the multiplicities that make up practice in the Asia Pacific, the project seeks to create its own terms of reference in order to decentre and disrupt the conventional understandings of feminist art and create new narratives for practices that are located in the here and now.

All welcome, please join the discussion. Email kellydoley@gmail.com to join the Feminist South mailing list and RSVP.

 

The Feminist South reading for June is: Introduction and Chapter One, The Birth of Chinese Feminism: Essential Texts in Transnational Theory, Edited by Lydia H. Liu, Rebecca E. Karl, and Dorothy Ko, Columbia 2013
https://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-birth-of-chinese-feminism/9780231162906 If you cannot get a copy yourself please get in touch. June’s Feminist South session will start with a quick discussion of the May text that we missed having a group chat about, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Talkin’ up to the White Woman : Aboriginal Women and Feminism, 2000.

DACCHI DANG: AN OMEN NEAR AND FAR

SYDNEY. 9 JUNE – 30 JULY 2017.

Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far is the first survey exhibition of one of the preeminent Vietnamese-Australian artists working today. Presenting a selection of works spanning three decades by a founding artist member of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Dacchi Dang is principally concerned with articulating the complex nature of diasporic experience and an ongoing redefinition of ideas of place and of home. With a focus on the artist’s work across photography, printmaking, video and installation, An Omen Near and Far signals the central importance of art in coming to terms with the contingencies of the past and of the present.

Born in Saigon and having experienced the latter years of the Vietnam War before fleeing his homeland on a boat to be eventually accepted as a refugee in Australia, Dacchi Dang’s life and art is deeply informed by this trauma, loss and an ongoing search for belonging. An Omen Near and Far unveils a new installation work commissioned by 4A that employs photography and wax that burns and melts over the duration of the exhibition. Informed by a recent 2017 trip to Vietnam, this new work is conceptually connected to an earlier, ephemeral sculpture and performance originally staged as Upstairs/downstairs at Sydney’s National Art School in 1994. This latter work – ghostly documentation of which is included in the survey – saw Dang burn a wax sculpture imprinted with photographic imagery recorded by the artist in Vietnam in that same year, his first visit to his country of birth since arriving in Australia in 1982.

Dacchi Dang’s dislocating experience of returning to Cholon, Saigon’s Chinese district and where he grew up, and extended family members in Bến Tre province in the Mekong Delta, prompted him to photograph the people and landscapes of Vietnam voraciously. Having shot over 100 rolls of black-and-white film on his Hasselblad, Dang’s photographic archive of daily life in urban and rural Vietnam documents a time concurrent with the momentous historic occasion of the lifting of the trade embargo between the U.S. and the Republic of Vietnam that had been in place since the end of military conflict in 1975. Dang’s source imagery – now a time capsule of the developing nation in flux– resulted in a highly productive period of experimentation. Spectacle I (1996) and Spectacle II (1996), a suite of monochromatic photogravure prints and their corresponding gold plates, present intimate portraits of ordinary Vietnamese and montaged street scenes tempered by an uneasy balance between empathy and distance.

In addition to series of works over the past decades that explore landscapes as colonised and contested forms of cultural memory, from Paris to Peel Island in Queensland’s Moreton Bay, An Omen Near and Far offers a selection of historical material from the archives of both the artist and 4A: photographic proof sheets, exhibition ephemera, reviews, interviews and critical texts. This includes documentation of Dang’s seminal solo exhibition, The Boat, presented at 4A in 2001, a milestone in the development of wider public reception and understanding of art from Asian-Australian perspectives. The Boat garnered strong community responses, opening up dialogue by addressing the profound perils of seeking asylum while prompting a critical consideration of Australia’s changing treatment of refugees.

Accompanying the exhibition, 4A will host a panel discussion that will offer insights into the historical research and creative development currently being undertaken by Dacchi Dang for the Australian War Memorial’s Gillespie Bequest commission of a new body of work due for completion over 2017–2018. Exploring the experiences of Australian and Vietnamese–Australians military veterans of the Vietnam War, and engaging with the Memorial’s extensive collection and archives, Dang’s commission represents the first such instance to form part of the national institution’s art collection.

 

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Dacchi Dang
 (b. Saigon, Vietnam, 1966) is an artist who lives and works in Sydney. He is a founding artist member of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dang was born to a Chinese father and Vietnamese mother, and at the age of sixteen fled Vietnam with his brother and sister on a fishing boat. After a traumatic sea voyage the boat arrived on Malaysian shores where Dang was transported to the refugee camp of Pulau Bidong. Following nine months at the camp, he was transported to Kuala Lumpur where he was accepted as a Vietnamese refugee by Australia in late 1982.

Dacchi Dang works primarily with photography and printmaking, in various forms and processes, and also video and installation. His work has been exhibited in Australia and internationally since the early 1990s. Solo exhibitions include Full Circle (2009), Metro Arts Gallery, Brisbane; Liminal (2006-2008), Horsham Regional Art Gallery, Victoria; Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne; and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney; Spectacle I (1996), Firstdraft Gallery, Sydney; Spectacle II, Stills Gallery, Sydney. Group exhibitions include DDESSIN [14] (2014), Paris Contemporary Drawing Fair, Atelier Richelieu; Crossing Boundaries (2014), Sydney Town Hall; Edge of Elsewhere (2010-2012), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney; Planet Ueno (2008); Taito Community Museum, Tokyo; Re-StArt (2008), 733 Art Factory, Chengdu; and News From Islands (2007), Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney.

He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (1991) and a Master of Arts (1996) from the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales, Sydney; Graduate Diploma in Archives and Records Management (2000) and Graduate Certificate of Applied Science in Cultural Heritage Studies specialising in Photography (2003) from University of Canberra; and a Doctor of Philosophy (Fine Arts) from Queensland College of the Arts, Griffith University, Brisbane (2013). Dang has undertaken numerous artist in residence programs including at Bundanon Trust (2001), Hill End (2001); Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris (2003) and Tokyo University of the Arts Geidai (2008). His work is held in public and private collections in Australia, France, China and Hong Kong. Over 2015-2018 Dang is producing new works commissioned by the Australian War Memorial Gillespie Bequest that explore the wartime experience of Vietnamese–Australians and its legacy today.


Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.
‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

Dacchi Dang, Liminal, (2005) installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Dacchi Dang, Liminal, (2005) installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Dacchi Dang: Artist book, 2001. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Dacchi Dang: Artist book, 2001, cyanotype on paper, bound with hand-stitch, 35 pages. Courtesy the artist and Bundanon Trust
collection, New South Wales.

 

Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Clockwise from left: Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996); Daachi Dang, Untitled (from the series Spectacle II) (1996). Installation view, all works courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Clockwise from left: Daachi Dang, Spectacle I, 1996, gold plates. Courtesy the artist; Daachi Dang, Untitled (from the series
Spectacle II),
1996, photogravure. Courtesy the artist and Horsham Regional Art Gallery Collection, Victoria, purchased through
the Horsham Art Gallery
Trust Fund with assistance from the Victorian Public Galleries Foundation, 1998.

 

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

Dacchi Dang, Et in Arcadia Ego, 2017, installation with wax, photographs, bamboo leaves commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

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Three images above – Exhibition Opening, 9 June 2017. Performance stills: Dacchi Dang, Et in Arcadia Ego, 2017, installation
with wax, photographs, bamboo leaves, commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and assisted by the Australian
Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. Courtesy the artist.

Progress: The Game of Leaders – 4A x Melbourne Festival

OCT 4 – 15 – MPavilion as part of Melbourne Festival

Program venue:
MPavilion
Queen Victoria Gardens, St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC 3004

 

  • Progress: The Game of Leaders can be played:
    Wednesday 4 October – 9AM – 12PM
    Daily, Thursday 5 October – Sunday 15 October – 9AM – 4PM

 

Where will you be standing when the First World falls?

Like a giant round of Jenga with Western civilisation as the stakes, Progress: The Game of Leaders invites you to take on the role of building a country. What blocks will you favour: economic progress or military spending? Higher standards of living or increasing globalisation? As players jockey for top position in the imaginary nation’s guidance, the structure grows more precarious and its foundations grow ever more compromised. The game can only end one way.

Singaporean artist Sam Lo’s Progress: The Game of Leaders is a playful and interactive allegory that asks what is put in peril by the unfettered progress of the First World, and is a refreshing take on world politics for a time that sorely needs it.

Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art as part of Melbourne Festival 2017.

 

About the artist:

Sam Lo (b. 1986), also known by the moniker SKL0, is a Singaporean contemporary artist whose work is heavily inspired by daily observations and research on the sociopolitical climate from which she executes through visual commentary comprising of text and imagery. The end results birth new meanings, lent to existing situations by incorporating ideas, messages and emotions with familiar visual codes into urban situations in hopes of creating experiences to invoke critical thought on the viewer’s everyday life. 

Exhibitions include solo shows at One East Asia Gallery (Singapore, 2017) and at The Substation (Singapore, 2015), as well as showcases like The Affordable Art Fair (Singapore 2013) and Georgetown Festival (Penang, Malaysia 2014). The artist has also released a book titled ‘Greetings From Singapore‘ and recently completed a residency in Delhi with ST+Art Foundation involving The Singapore High Commission and Singapore Tourism Board.

Sam is also founder of the creative platforms Project XIV and INDIGOISM.

Congee Lunch Tour: Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far

SYDNEY – 12PM – 2PM Saturday 1 July 2017
Departing: 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 181-187 Hay St, Haymarket, NSW.
Join 4A’s Pedro de Almeida, for a lunchtime tour of Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far and get a taste of Haymarket with lunchtime congee, and an opportunity to meet artist Dacchi Dang and see his performance Et in Arcadia Ego.

Places for this special tour are limited and this event is presented as part of our June exhibition, Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far.

 

Congee and associated snacks are included in your ticket price.

Publication Launch – Our Issue: Curatorial actions shaping a discourse about Asia from Asia

Publication launch

Our Issue: Curatorial actions shaping a discourse about Asia from Asia 

4A is pleased to host the Sydney launch of Anabelle Lacroix’s recent publication at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

5.30PM, Thursday May 25 2017, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. 181-187 Hay Street, Haymarket, Sydney

The publication will be launched by writer and curator Anabelle Lacroix in conversation with Luise Guest from White Rabbit.

About Our Issue:

After several continuous waves of European, Japanese and Chinese colonisation, Taiwan is now seeking to create a clear political and cultural identity of its own. Informed by its unique history Taiwan is home to a thriving and engaged contemporary art scene that is increasingly active. Our Issue is a new publication that captures a growing section of Taiwanese contemporary art.

In 2016 Taiwan has three major biennales running concurrently and a host of other cultural events offering a plethora of diverse contemporary offerings. It brought to the fore the strengthening of a discourse about ‘Asia from Asia’—from within, as opposed to a Western one—with ideas of decolonisation and ‘de-cold War’ at its centre. This essay sheds light, and discusses the growth of curatorial projects from within Asia that seek to profile a shifting discourse in the region. Examining major biennales, museum exhibitions as well as independent spaces and artist-run initiatives, Lacroix’s new publication considers emerging perspectives of contemporary Asian art in Taiwan.

This bilingual English – Chinese publication was published by the Kuandu Museum of Fine Arts following Anabelle Lacroix’s curatorial residency at the museum. This residency is a reciprocal exchange between RMIT University and Taipei National University of the Arts (TNUA).

Biographies:

Anabelle Lacroix is a curator based in Melbourne, currently working as a research assistant at the VCA, University of Melbourne on a project on Artist Run Initiatives in Australia and the Asia-Pacific, and produces the visual arts program of the Melbourne Festival. Prior to her Taipei residency she took part in the 2016 4A Curators’ Intensive, and is now co-curating an upcoming 2017 Liquid Architecture project in Taiwan.

Luise Guest is Director of Education and Research for the White Rabbit Collection of Contemporary Chinese Art. With a background in art education and freelance writing focused on China, Luise’s art writing has been published in a range of online and print journals. Her book, ‘Half the Sky: Conversations with Women Artists in China’ was published by Piper Press in 2016, and she curated exhibitions in Hong Kong and Beijing to coincide with its launch in China. Luise’s current research focuses on contemporary female artists who subvert the conventions of ink painting and calligraphy. She blogs at www.anartteacherinchina.blogspot.com

BOOK NOW

This launch is held in conjunction with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art’s Australian premier screenings of He Xiangyu’s The Swim which will begin at 6.3opm. You are welcome to attend.

Sydney Information Night: 4A Emerging Writers’ Program 2017

4A invites interested applicants to join us on May 25 in Sydney to meet with 4A staff to learn more about the 4A Emerging Writers’ Program, and ask any questions you may have about the Program.

Applications are now open and close 5.00PM Friday 30 June 2017.

Sydney Info Night with 4A Papers Editor Pedro de Almeida- RSVP here.
Guest Speaker: 2016 Emerging Writer Minerva Inwald
5.30PM – 6.30PM, Friday 25 May
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 181-187 Hay St Haymarket, Sydney.

Followed by a screening of He Xiangyu’s The Swim.

The 4A Emerging Writer’s Program is open to Australian students currently undertaking a degree at honours or postgraduate level in art, history or related fields of study at an Australian tertiary institution. This program will be rigorous and is specifically designed for tertiary students with a keen interest in fieldwork research in art and culture, and someone who can demonstrate a flair and passion for writing.

The selected writer will undertake a one-week research trip to a Pacific nation in September 2017. Facilitated by 4A and its networks, the writer will be asked to conceive and deliver two writing outcomes for publication in 4A Papers and Program supporter Art Monthly Australasia. This may include a critical essay, historical research, interview, review, profile, or feature with accompanying online audio-visual content.

The writer will be supported by the team at 4A and in particular by Pedro de Almeida, Editor, 4A Papers and Michael Fitzgerald, Editor, Art Monthly Australasia.

The 4A Emerging Writer’s Program has been developed as part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art’s broader professional development program for early career arts professionals. Together with the annual 4A Beijing Studio Program and the biannual 4A Curators’ Intensive, the 4A Emerging Writer’s Program supports emerging Australian talent to work within the Asia-Pacific region.

Applications will be assessed by a panel and the selected writer notified within two weeks following the submission deadline.

 

If you have any questions in relation to the program or how to apply please contact Pedro de Almeida on (02) 9212 0380 or pedro.de-almeida@4a.com.au

 

The 4A Emerging Writer’s Program is supported by Art Monthly Australasia.

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Familiar Stranger

SYDNEY. 7 APRIL – 21 MAY 2017.

Artists: Shumon Ahmed, Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, Bashir Makhoul, Veer Munshi, Shireen Taweel and Curtis Taylor.

The reconciliation between memory and reality plagues the act of returning. There is no resolution between the two. Memories are etched into the psyche hinged on topographical monuments, whispered words and subconscious everyday patterns while reality erases such symbology through the passing of time. Familiar Stranger examines this third, non-existent space that plagues the returnee as they seek to retrace their memories in places that have been rebuilt or reinscribed. With familiarity reduced to invisible archaeological sites the returnee searches for recognition and legitimacy in a now unacquainted geography.

The exhibiting artists examine the negation and erasure of familiarity by presenting place as a space defined by uncertainty. There is a continue shift between points of view that begets the collapse of spatial certainty and becomes defined by its own instability. For the migrant the idea of returning becomes an implicit part of their identity; the constant oscillation between the possibility and impossibility of return a daily taunt. In Familiar Stranger the moment of return is the focal point where, for some, it is a wistful hope and for others a violent decimation of expectancy. Resisting melodrama, the artists turn to the familial archive and the personal memorial to bring form to the constant internal struggle between what is and what was.

 

About the artists:

Bashir Makhoul (b. 1963, Galilee, Palestine, lives and works in Birmingham, United Kingdom) is a Palestinian artist born in Galilee in 1963. He has been based in the United Kingdom for the past 22 years. During this time he has produced a body of work, based on repeated motifs, which can be characterized by their power of aesthetic seduction. Once drawn into the work however, viewers find themselves engaged with something far more complicated than a beautiful pattern. Economics, nationalism, war and torture are frequently woven into the layers of Makhoul’s work and often the more explicit the material, the more seductive the surface.

Makhoul completed his PhD in 1995 at Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK. He has exhibited his work widely in Britain and internationally, including the Hayward Gallery, London, Tate Liverpool, Harris Museum, Preston, Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, the Liverpool Biennial, Jordan National Museum, NCA Gallery Lahore Pakistan, the Florence Biennial, Haus am Lutzowplatz Berlin, UTS Gallery, Sydney, Australia, Elga Wimmer Gallery, New York, Changshu Art Museum, Suzhou Art Museum, Shenzhen Art Museum in China, 798 Yang Gallery Beijing and many others. In 2013, he  presented his work at the Venice Biennial in Italy and Aichi Biennial in Japan. He will show at the Asian Triennial in Manchester UK in 2014.

Curtis Taylor (b. Broome, Western Australia, Australia, lives and works in Perth, Australia) is a filmmaker, screen artist, actor and a young Martu leader. Growing up in remote Martu desert communities and in the city, Curtis has both traditional Martu knowledge and a non-Aboriginal education. After finishing school in 2008 Curtis worked as Community Coordinator and Youth Development Officer at Martu Media (a division of Kanyirninpa Jukurrpa), where he also spent 18 months working on the major Yiwarra Kuju: The Canning Stock Route project as a filmmaker and youth ambassador. Curtis was the recipient of the 2011 Western Australian Youth Art Award and Wesfarmers Youth Scholarship. His screen work including the acclaimed short film ‘Mamu’ has been shown in international film festivals from Brazil to Nepal. Curtis has almost completed his film and media studies at Murdoch University. He was the Director’s Attachment and is the Narrator of ‘Collisions’.

Chun Yin Rainbow Chan ( b. 1990, Hong Kong, lives and works in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is a multidisciplinary artist who works across sound, performance and installation. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Sydney, she is interested in duality, diaspora and the effects of globalisation on modern Chinese society. Chan often evokes traditional Chinese methods or styles and represents them in uncanny ways. Her research engages with the authentic and the copy, exploring sites of exchange and desire which complicate Western notions of originality and “appropriate” consumption.

Central to Chan’s work is the circulation of knock-off objects, sounds and images in global media. Her work positions the fake as a complex sign that shapes new myths, values and contemporary commodity production. Sustained by a parasitic relationship to the original, the counterfeit interacts with the world in unpredictable ways. Chan investigates how these mimetic symbols, such as bootlegs or fake luxury goods, problematise the socially-regulated impulse of consumerist desire.

Tying together her works across installation and pop music is the relationship between nostalgia, migration and identity. Since winning FBi Radio’s Northern Lights Competition in 2011, Chan has been building a reputation as one of the most innovative artists in Australia with her highly personal, experimental pop music. She recently released her debut album Spacings (Silo Arts & Records) which was met with critical acclaim, handpicked as the feature album on FBi Radio, Radio Adelaide, RTRFM and scoring 4 stars from Rolling Stone. Under her techno project, Chunyin, Chan released Code Switch EP on UK label, Off Out, in September.

Chan has performed extensively with notable performances at the Sydney Opera House, Museum of Contemporary Art, Gallery of Modern Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales and Iceland Airwaves Festival. She has exhibited works at Firstdraft Gallery, Liquid Architecture and Squiggle Space. In October 2016, she was invited by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art to participate in the inaugural Longli International New Media Arts Festival in Guizhou Province, China. Chan has collaborated with choreographer Ivey Wawn for Out of The Studio, presented by DirtyFeet, and soundtracked ABC web-series The Glass Bedroom, directed by Kate Blackmore.

Shumon Ahmed  (b. 1977, Bangladesh, lives and works in Dhaka, Bangladesh) is a Dhaka-based poet and an artist who explores the fusion between video, photography, Sound, text and performance, creating stories that while seemingly contradictory, are private yet collective. His work with the camera and film has also been likened to abstract painting due to his experimental processing techniques with unpredictable results that yield the melancholic.

Ahmed studied photography at the South Asian Media Academy, Dhaka, Bangladesh (2006- 2009) & at The Danish school of Media and Journalism, Arhus, Denmark (2008).

His work has been previously exhibited in various galleries, festivals and screenings around the world including the 2014 Kochi-Muziris Biennale, India, Dhaka Art Summit, Bangladesh (2012, 2014, 2016), Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2010), Fotomuseum, Winterthur, Switzerland (2010), Art science museum, Singapore (2016), Krinzinger Projekete, Austria (2016) and a recent solo exhibition at Project88, Mumbai, India (2015).

In April, Shumon will take part in Familiar Stranger, a group exhibition at 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney.

Veer Munshi (b. 1955, Kashmir, India, lives and works in Dehli, India), a Kashmiri artist who now lives in Delhi has consistently used his art to reflect his anguish at the situation in his home state, his pain and struggle spilling over onto his canvass. Making a human rights statement rather than a political one, he has constantly sought to highlight the turmoil that comes  with his separation from his heritage, and to highlight the increasingly the narrow space that exists for culture and art in his state. He is also convinced that art. Because of its universal nature, can play a significant role in the resolution of the Kashmir situation. Unlike other contemporary artists, though, viewing pleasure is no motivator for veer in the creation of his art,rather it is about sharing a personally-felt experience as a ‘refugee’. His paintings and installations reflect a Kashmir that is in the context of the Kashmir.

Shireen Taweel (b. 1990, Bankstown, New South Wales, Australia, lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is currently practicing at the Parramatta Artist Studios in Sydney.  Much of Taweel’s practice is informed by her identity connected to the Middle East as her heritage further inspires her creative exploration through the refined processes in metallurgy. The nature of the relationship of her forms sit in a space between jewellery and sculpture, where her techniques of making takes the traditional art of copper-smithing into a contemporary context.

The works partake in a cross-cultural discourse, while the sense of the arcane and shifted structures opens dialogue between shared histories and relations between communities of fluid identities.

Taweel is a current Kickstart Helix Next Wave participant. Her recent solo shows include fractured//fluid terrains at SEVENTH Gallery, Melbourne (2017), translated roots at Verge Gallery, Sydney (2017) tomorrow, InshAllah at 55 Sydenham RD Marrickville, Sydney (2016) rhythms of the ritualistic at Gaffa Gallery, Sydney (2016) and promised denial at 146 ArtSpace, Hobart (2016).  Taweel is also a nominee of The Jameel Art Prize (2018) at Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

 

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

 

Left: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Bashir Makhoul, Wounds, 2007 – 2008, lenticular print,
400 x 200cm. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography. Right: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian
Art: Veer Munshi, Leaves like hands of flame, 2010 – 2012, two channel video, 5: 32. Courtesy the artist and Latitude 28, New
Delhi, India.


Left: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shumon Ahmed, What I have forgotten could fill an ocean,
what is not real never lived, 2013, polaroid photographs, analogue phone set, original sarod score composed by Yusuf Khan and
poetry recited by Nader Salam, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist, Samdani Art Foundation, Dhaka, Bangladesh &
Project88, Mumbai, India. Image: Document Photography Right: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:
Bashir Makhoul, Wounds, 2007 – 2008, lenticular print, 400 x 200cm. Courtesy the artist.


Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shumon Ahmed, What I have forgotten could fill an ocean, what is
not real never lived, 2013, polaroid photographs, analogue phone set, original sarod score composed by Yusuf Khan and poetry
recited by Nader Salam, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist, Samdani Art Foundation, Dhaka, Bangladesh & Project88,
Mumbai, India.


Right: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shireen Taweel, Al Nahas, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm.
Courtesy the artist. Shireen Taweel, Al Nahas, 2015, etched copper, 100 x 90 x 40. Courtesy the artist. Left: Installation view,
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Curtis Taylor works as below. Curtis Taylor, Karlaya, 2014, video, 23 seconds.
Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marlu, 2014, video, 42 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marrka Marrka – Mirage, 2017,
red dirt and animated projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Parnajarrpa, 2014, video, 29 seconds.
Courtesy the artist.


a4-april-web-33

Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Chun Yin Rainbow Chan (陳雋然), To enclose one’s mouth, 2017, ink,
silk, wood, video loop, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist.


Left: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Curtis Taylor works as below. Curtis Taylor, Karlaya, 2014,
video, 23 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marlu, 2014, video, 42 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marrka
Marrka – Mirage, 2017, red dirt and animated projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Parnajarrpa,
2014, video, 29 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Image, Document Photography. Right: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary
Asian Art: Shireen Taweel, Dome, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm. Courtesy the artist. Image, Document Photography. And
Shireen Taweel, Sophia, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm. Courtesy the artist.

An Omen Near and Far: Tour & Talk

SYDNEY, SAT 10 JUNE, 11.00AM – 12.30PM

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Part of the public program for 4A’s exhibition Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far

 

Join 4A for an artist-led exhibition tour of Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far followed by a panel discussion centred on Dacchi Dang’s current production of a new body of work commissioned by the Australian War Memorial.

Showcasing work spanning three decades, Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far is the first survey exhibition of one of the preeminent Vietnamese-Australian artists working today. Dang will lead a tour of the exhibition, offering insights into the evolution of his practice across photography, printmaking, and video, and discuss the development of his new installation work, specially commissioned by 4A for the exhibition, that has arisen from research undertaken during a return to Vietnam in 2017.

Following the tour, 4A hosts a panel discussion between the artist, Dr Anthea Gunn, Senior Curator of Art at the Australian War Memorial, and 4A Program Manager Pedro de Almeida centred upon Dacchi’s creation of a new body of work for the Australian War Memorial’s Gillespie Bequest commission (2016-2018).

In 2012 a bequest was left to the Australian War Memorial by the retired Major John Milton Gillespie, a Vietnam veteran and immigration consultant. In recognition of both this significant gift and Mr Gillespie’s life and work, the Memorial decided to use the bequest to commission work that explores the wartime experience of Vietnamese–Australians and its legacy today. Engaging Australian and Vietnamese–Australians military veterans of the Vietnam War – whom the artist has recorded interviews with around Australia – and engaging with the Memorial’s extensive collection and archives, Dang’s nationally significant commission will represent the first contribution from a Vietnamese–Australian artist to the Memorial’s art collection.

The exhibition tour led by Dacchi Dang will run for 30 minutes from 11.00am – 11.30am, followed by a 60-minute panel discussion from 11.30am – 12.30pm allowing time for audience questions.

Feminist South Reading Group – April 2017

‘Feminism is a Western Concept: a reading group’
6.00PM – 7.30PM, Thursday 27 April 2017

  • 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

181-187 Hay St, Haymarket NSW

From April, in partnership with Feminist South, 4A will host a a monthly Feminist South reading group on the last Thursday of the month beginning 27 April. This reading group is Phase 1 of the Feminist South research and curatorial project led by Kelly Doley and i:project space, Beijing.

Feminist South is a curatorial project and research platform spanning across 2017-2019 that aims to generate critical dialogue around contemporary feminist performance practice in the context of the Asia Pacific.

Rather than attempting to fit Western feminist theories and movements onto the multiplicities that make up practice in the Asia Pacific, the project seeks to create its own terms of reference in order to decentre and disrupt the conventional understandings of feminist art and create new narratives for practices that are located in the here and now.

All welcome, please join the discussion.

Readings for April are:

  • Chandra Talpade Mohanty, “‘Under Western Eyes’ Revisited: Feminist Solidarity through Anticapitalist Struggle,” in her Feminism Without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity (Durham, N.C., and London: Duke University Press, 2003), pp.221-251
  • Maura Reilly, “Introduction: Toward Transnational Feminisms,” Global Feminisms: New Directions in Contemporary Art (London/New York: Merrell, 2007), pp. 14–45.

Participants will be provided with reading links upon RSVP.

Familiar Stranger – Chun Yin Rainbow Chan Performances

SYDNEY – AS PART OF FAMILIAR STRANGER – 7 APRIL – 21 MAY  2017.

Visit 4A at the following times to see Chun Yin Rainbow Chan perform as part of her Familiar Stranger work:

  • 11.30am Saturday 22 April
  • 2.00pm Saturday 29 April

Bookings are not required for these special performance events.

 

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Chun Yin Rainbow Chan perform as part of her Familiar Stranger work, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. Image: Document Photography.
4a-rainbow-may-web-4
Chun Yin Rainbow Chan perform as part of her Familiar Stranger work, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-rainbow-may-web-6

Chun Yin Rainbow Chan perform as part of her Familiar Stranger work, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. Image: Document Photography.

Familiar Stranger – Cantonese Class

As part of the public program for Familiar Stranger, you are invited to join us for weekly Cantonese language classes on Thursday nights for the duration of the exhibition.

With a curriculum curated by Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, join us for these one-hour classes to either refresh or learn new language skills and gain a further insight into Chan’s work.

  • 6-7.30PM Thursday 20 April 2017
  • 6-7.30PM Thursday 27 April 2017
  • 6-7.30PM Thursday 4 May 2017
  • 6-7.30PM Thursday 11 May 2017
  • 6-7.30PM Thursday 18 May 2017

Bookings are open now.

4A Emerging Writer’s Program – 2017

4A is pleased to announce that the 4A Emerging Writer’s Program 2017 program recipient is Mitana Arbon, current Honours student in Asian Studies at ANU. Mitiana will be travelling to Samoa in late 2017 to undertake research and build engagement with local artistic communities in Upolu and Savai’i.

Mitiana Arbon is an Honours student at the School of Culture, History, and Language at the Australian National University. His research thesis examines how institutions curate and articulate an understanding of the Pacific as a cohesive art region through art. It draws upon a case study of the Pacific Collection at the National Gallery of Australia examining how its narrow curatorial focus on ‘traditional’ art pieces as reflective of Pacific Cultures, has limited a broader creative and aesthetic understanding of the current reality of multi-sited and diverse contemporary community practices.

Mitiana has a wide range of creative and personal interests in the Pacific region that stems from his dual academic engagement with the Pacific and his Samoan family, from the village of Tafua tai, Savai’i. He is also a Research Officer on Labour Mobility and Migration at the Development Policy Centre and an avid blogger on Pacific topics. His research interests include contemporary regional issues of development, politics, social change and heritage management.


4A Program Manager and Editor of the 4A Papers, Pedro de Almeida says,

“In its second year, 4A’s Emerging Writer’s Program attracted applicants from New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and the Australian Capital Territory. This year the Program was offered to emerging writers who are also current tertiary students at honours and postgraduate level. Additionally, in 2017 4A decided to put a focus on facilitating writers’ engagement with Pacific nations, cultures and artists. Applicants came from a variety of research areas including arts, art history, curatorial studies and Asian studies. 4A was impressed that the majority of the applicants had demonstrated a keen interest in and knowledge of the region, proposing fieldwork in Hawai’i, Samoa, Tuvalu and Vanuatu with subjects ranging from the development of private collections and museums to the visual culture that emanates from Vanuatu’s reggae music scene.”

2017 Emerging Writer’s Program judge Lisa McDonald (Associate Curator, Human History (Maori and Pacific) at Canterbury Museum and Adjunct Fellow with the School of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Canterbury) said:

“Mitiana’s project reflects his deep commitment to the field of Pacific studies. His proposal was of the highest merit and clearly demonstrated his academic engagement with current research methodologies. Privileging the agency of indigenous artists based in Samoa, his project will no doubt provide insightful analysis of the creative practices of contemporary makers. I congratulate Mitiana on his award and wish him every future success in both his professional and personal pursuits.”

Art Monthly Australasia Editor and 2017 Emerging Writer’s Program judge, Micheal Fitzgerald, said:

Art Monthly Australasia is excited to be involved again with the 4A Emerging Writer’s Program, inaugurated last year with the ‘Sea Pearl White Cloud’ project in Guangzhou, and commends this year’s initiative in sending an emerging writer into the Pacific. Mitiana’s winning submission to conduct research with a number of contemporary artists based in Samoa was a stand-out proposal and promises to deepen this important new engagement with the region.”


About the judging panel:

Michael Fitzgerald was the arts editor for the South Pacific edition of Time magazine (1997-2007) before becoming managing editor of Art & Australia (2008-12) and helping relaunch Photofile magazine for the Australian Centre for Photography in 2013. He has been editor of Art Monthly Australasia since 2014.

Dr Lisa McDonald is Associate Curator, Human History (Maori and Pacific) at Canterbury Museum and Adjunct Fellow with the School of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Canterbury. Her research focuses on contemporary art from Melanesia, with emphasis on makers based in Port Vila and Port Moresby.

Pedro de Almeida is an arts manager, curator and writer, joining 4A as Program Manager in 2012. Over the past decade he has developed and delivered a broad range of artistic and cultural projects in partnership with local and international organisations that have been distinguished by their engagement with culturally and socially diverse artists, communities and audiences.


ABOUT THE 4A EMERGING WRITER’S PROGRAM

DEADLINE:                Friday 30 June 2017

TRAVEL DATES:       September 2017   

 

Following the inaugural offering in 2016, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is pleased to announce the 4A Emerging Writer’s Program that will support an emerging Australian writer to travel to the Pacific in September 2017 to realise two publication outcomes.

The 4A Emerging Writer’s Program is open to Australian students currently undertaking a degree at honours or postgraduate level in art, history or related fields of study at an Australian tertiary institution. This program will be rigorous and is specifically designed for tertiary students with a keen interest in fieldwork research in art and culture, and someone who can demonstrate a flair and passion for writing.

The selected writer will undertake a one-week research trip to a Pacific nation in September 2017. Facilitated by 4A and its networks, the writer will be asked to conceive and deliver two writing outcomes for publication in 4A Papers and Program supporter Art Monthly Australasia. This may include a critical essay, historical research, interview, review, profile, or feature with accompanying online audio-visual content.

The writer will be supported by the team at 4A and in particular by Pedro de Almeida, Editor, 4A Papers and Michael Fitzgerald, Editor, Art Monthly Australasia.

The 4A Emerging Writer’s Program has been developed as part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art’s broader professional development program for early career arts professionals. Together with the annual 4A Beijing Studio Program and the biannual 4A Curators’ Intensive, the 4A Emerging Writer’s Program supports emerging Australian talent to work within the Asia-Pacific region.

 

The 4A Emerging Writer’s Program has been made possible with the support of 4A Patrons Richard Funston & Kiong Lee.

 

KEY DATES

Applications open:                   Monday 3 April 2017

Sydney Info Night:                  Friday 26 May 2017 – RSVP here.

Applications close:                  Friday 30 June 2017 (5.00pm)

Samoa travel dates:                September 2017

(exact dates of one-week itinerary to be determined in consultation with 4A).

 

APPLICATION GUIDELINES

The selected writer must be:

  • Over the age of 18 years.
  • An Australian citizen or permanent resident who is enrolled in a degree at honours or postgraduate level in art, history or related fields of study at an Australian tertiary institution at the time of application.
  • The definition of “emerging” is a writer who has not previously published more than 12 texts in any subject, in print or online (blogs or self-published platforms excluded).

4A will provide the selected writer with:

  • Return airfare from the recipient’s nearest state capital city to chosen Pacific nation.
  • Accommodation, per diems and travel insurance for the period of the trip.
  • An honourarium.

To apply, submit a single PDF document including:

  • A Cover Page with your name, address, phone number, email address and evidence of current tertiary enrolment (student ID card or similar).
  • A Letter of Intent addressing your interest in participating in the Program, articulating your specific area of interest in the Pacific and which nation you propose to travel to; how it will be beneficial to you; and how it will contribute to the development of your research and writing practice. Maximum one page.
  • A Statement that outlines your current writing or research focuses and interests. Maximum one page.
  • A CV illustrating relevant study and work experience, previously published texts, personal projects and achievements. Maximum one page.
  • A Writing Sample of up to 1,000 words (this can be unpublished and preferably in a professional writing style rather than academic in tone).
  • A Proposed Collection of Writings that you would produce as part of this project. Maximum one page.
  • Shortlisted writers will be asked to provide evidence of Australian permanent residency status, current enrolment at honours or postgraduate level at an Australian tertiary institution, and date of birth.

 

Applications should be submitted via email, post or in person to:

Pedro de Almeida

Program Manager / Editor, 4A Papers

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

 

In person: 181-187 Hay Street, Haymarket, NSW 2000

Post: PO Box K1312, Haymarket NSW 1240

Email: pedro.de-almeida@4a.com.au

 

Applications closed 5.00PM Friday 30 June 2017.

Applications were assessed by a panel and the selected writer notified within two weeks following the submission deadline.

 

If you have any questions in relation to the program or how to apply please contact Pedro de Almeida on (02) 9212 0380 or pedro.de-almeida@4a.com.au

 

The 4A Emerging Writer’s Program is supported by Art Monthly Australasia, and made possible with the generous support of 4A Patrons Richard Funston & Kiong Lee.

art-monthly-australasia-1

 


Image: Observation Society from the street during the install of Sea Pearl White Cloud, part of the 2016 4A Emerging Writers Program, May 2016. Photo: Pedro de Almeida.

Over two weeks spanning late May and early June 2016, Minerva Inwald, 4A’s 2016 Emerging Writers Program participant, traveled to Guangzhou, China, to experience the lead up to Sea Pearl White Cloud 海珠白雲, a collaborative two-stage exhibition project produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and local independent contemporary art space, Observation Society, that saw presentations in Guangzhou and Sydney. Sea Pearl White Cloud presented new works by Australian artist Lucas Ihlein and Hong Kong-based artist Trevor Yeung that are informed by questions of temporality, exchange and poetics while reflecting on the urban condition in the twenty-first century. Read her piece for the 4A Papers here.

 

 

4A Beijing Studio Program – 2017 call for applications

Applications have now closed for the 2017 edition of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art’s annual Beijing Studio Program.

 

DEADLINE:                5PM, Monday May 8 2017

TRAVEL DATES:      Tuesday, 12 September – Friday, 13 October, 2017

 

 

The program allows three early career artists will undertake a one month-long intensive studio program throughout September 2017 at the studios of internationally renowned Chinese-Australian, artist Shen Shaomin located in Huairou District on the outskirts of Beijing.

4A’s Beijing Studio Program provides a unique opportunity for these artists to research new projects, develop new professional networks and witness first-hand the changes occurring in one of the most vibrant cities in Asia. The program includes return airfares, accommodation, travel stipend and travel/medical insurance.

Applications have now closed and were due by 5PM AEST Monday May 8, 2017.

 

ABOUT SHEN SHAOMIN

Over the last twenty years Chinese-Australian artist Shen Shaomin has forged an important international career with an emphasis on experimental, conceptual and installation works. Ba