UNSW Art & Design presents at 4A: Contemporary Chinese Art, Aesthetic Modernity and Zhang Peili: Towards a Critical Contemporaneity

SYDNEY. 6-8PM, THU 21 NOV.

4A CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART

Free but registrations required.

Join Paul Gladston, Inaugural Judith Neilson Professor of Contemporary Art at UNSW, in conversation about his latest book – with Alan Cruickshank, editor of di’van | A Journal of Accounts at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: 

About the book Contemporary Chinese Art, Aesthetic Modernity and Zhang Peili: Towards a Critical Contemporaneity:

In recent decades the previously assumed dominance within the international art world of western(ized) conceptions of aesthetic modernity has been challenged by a critically becalming diversification of cultural outlooks widely referred to as ‘contemporaneity’. Contributing to that diversification are assertions within mainland China of essential differences between Chinese and other artistic cultures.

 In response to the critical impasse posed by contemporaneity, Paul Gladston charts a historical relay of mutually formative interactions between western(ised) post-Enlightenment artworlds and those prevalent historically and contemporaneously within China as part of a new transcultural theory of artistic criticality. Informed by deconstructivism as well as syncretic Confucianism, Gladston extends this theory to a reading of the work of the artist Zhang Peili and his involvement with the Hangzhou-based art group, the Pond Association (Chi she). Revealed is a critical aesthetic productively resistant to any single interpretative viewpoint, including those of Chinese exceptionalism and the supposed immanence of deconstructivist uncertainty.

Addressing art in and from the People’s Republic of China as a significant aspect of post-West contemporaneity, Gladston provides a new critical understanding of what it means to be ‘contemporary’ and the profound changes taking place in the art world today.

“essential reading for a better understanding of contemporary Chinese art and visual culture in the global context.”

–  Jason C. Kuo, Professor of Chinese Art, University of Maryland, USA

“a landmark work both in terms of cultural-criticism and art-historical analysis”

–  Paul Manfredi, Professor of Chinese, Pacific Lutheran University, USA

“anchor[s] reflections on issues of immense contemporary importance”

– Johnson Chang, Curatorial Director, Hanart TZ Gallery, Hong Kong

“an important contribution to critical discourse on contemporary art”

–  Birgit Hopfener, Associate Professor of Art History, Carleton University, Canada

About the speakers:

Paul Gladston is the inaugural Judith Neilson Professor of Contemporary Art at the University of New South Wales and was previously Professor of Contemporary Visual Cultures and Critical Theory at the University of Nottingham. Paul has written extensively on contemporary Chinese art with regard to the concerns of critical theory and, in doing so, has been formative on the development of a critically informed contemporary Chinese art studies both internationally and inside China. His recent book-length publications include Contemporary Chinese Art: A Critical History (2014), which received ‘publication of the year’ at the Awards of Art China 2015. He was founding principal editor of the peer-reviewed Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art from 2014 to 2017 and an academic adviser to the internationally acclaimed exhibition Art of Change: New Directions from China staged at the Hayward Gallery-South Bank Centre London in 2012.

Alan Cruickshank is the founding editor and publisher of di’van | A Journal of Accounts, a new journal now in its third year offering critical interpretations on contemporary visual art and its art-historical, theoretical and socio-political contexts in the greater Asia-Pacific region. Alan was previously Executive Director of the Contemporary Art Centre of SA, Adelaide and Editor of Broadsheet magazine between 2000 and 2015. He is currently Honorary Fellow, Centre for Visual Arts, Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne.

Please Explain: who is picking the fruit?

4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. In this edition of Please Explain, as part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art exhibition John Vea: If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back? speakers discuss the realities and unrepresented stories in contemporary globalised era migrant labour, which emerged as a key indicator of regional socio-economic relationships between Australia, New Zealand and many Pacific nations.

Taking the words of Australian deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack – who echoed the title of Vea’s exhibition when he came under fire for claiming the Pacific Islands will survive climate change because their workers come here to “pick our fruit”, following the August 2019 Pacific Island Forum in Tuvalu – as a starting point, this discussion will question such preconceptions about temporary migrant labour, and discuss the lived experience of the migrant worker.

Framed by Vea’s 2015 text The Emic Avenue; art through Talanoa and the concept of talanoa (a process of inclusive, participatory and transparent dialogue) as research method, speakers Christine Afoa, Malaemie Fruean, Leo Tanoi  and John Vea, with moderator Micheal Do, will discuss the stories, experiences and representations of Pacific migrant workers and the role art and storytelling can play in reframing and challenging the ideas of equality and validity of a global workforce.

Moderator: Micheal Do, 4A Assistant Curator and John Vea: If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back? curator with Dr Mikala Tai.

Speakers:

Christine Afoa is a Samoan-Australian writer born and raised in the Bankstown area. She is undertaking a creative writing degree at the University of Technology. Christine has performed poetry for SoFar Sounds Lounge and Bankstown Poetry Slam and her short stories have been published in UTS Writers’ Anthology 2018: Light Borrowers, 2019: Infinite Threads and Sweatshop Women: Volume One. Christine is a member of Sweatshop: Western Sydney Literacy Movement.

Malaemie Fruean is Chair, NSW Council for Pacific Communities. Established in 2003, the organisation was established to create opportunities and lend support to Pacific Communities in New South Wales, Fruean has led the organisation since its inception. Prior to this Fruean worked in community, cultural development for over two decades with experience as an educator and community liaison and leader.

Leo Tanoi is a creative producer specialising in Pacific contemporary arts practice. With over two decades of experience, Tanoi has held a number of roles and worked with artists including Greg Semu, Shigeyuki Kihara, Angela Tiatia and Michel Tufferey. From 2010 – 2015, Tanoi was the Creative Producer, Pacific Programs at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre. In this time, he developed a number of projects including ‘Body Pacifica’ (2010) which won the Museums & Galleries NSW’s Imagine Award for Best Exhibition and Public Engagement Program. Prior to this, Tanoi contributed to ‘Edge of Elsewhere’ as a community and cultural advisor on ‘Edge of Elsewhere’ (2010 – 2012), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Campbelltown Arts Centre. Tanoi currently is a freelance Creative Producer in the arts & culture sector and has been a peer assessor for Create NSW from 2016-2019. He is also an aspiring visual artist.

John Vea is an Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland) based artist who works with sculpture, video and performance art. Vea works with tropes of migration and gentrification that exist within Moana Nui a Kiwa (the Pacific Ocean). By enacting stories that have been collected through everyday interactions with people, both in his home community and abroad, with a journalistic sensibility he offers a sometimes humorous and always powerfully symbolic emic viewpoint to the Western meta narrative.

Listen to a recording of the event below:

Congee Breakfast Tour: Nusra Latif Qureshi: Strategies of Intent

SYDNEY. SAT 28 SEPTEMBER, 11.00AM – 12.30PM

Departing from 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Join exhibiting artist Nusra Latif Qureshi, Curator Dr Mikala Tai and Curatorial Assistant Nanette Orly for a special exhibition tour of Strategies of Intent, followed by a traditional Chinatown breakfast at a much-loved local eatery where attendees will discuss some of the stories and ideas behind the Nusra’s works and the themes explored in the exhibition.

About the exhibition: Nusra Latif Qureshi’s first solo Australian institutional exhibition presents her ongoing investigation into the symbolism and assumptions embedded in art history. Reflecting on almost two decades of practice Qureshi’s attempts to undermine, shift and negate historical imagery reads as a warning for the contemporary age, where assumed realities can be little more than constructed visions.

Qureshi’s practice is characterised by meticulous layering, fragmentation, erasure and juxtaposition of visual material. Through such intervention, she investigates little known histories of colonial eras, questions established narratives and engages with the politics of representation. Through an examination of the visual histories of the South Asian region Qureshi has developed a new visual vernacular in which to examine and interrogate the act of historicisation.

Strategies of Intent brings together key works from Qureshi’s oeuvre as well as a series of new commissions by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. These commissions are Qureshi’s most ambitious to date and include a series of installations that draw on key colonial imagery, engage with the reverence of weaponry and critique the museological convention of collecting and ownership.

Nusra Latif Qureshi (b. Lahore, Pakistan, lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) attended the National College of Arts, Lahore and completed her Masters of Fine Art at the University of Melbourne. Qureshi’s practices engages with the visual histories of the South Asian region and Australian culture, questioning conventional interpretations, pulling apart and reconfiguring the found patterns to construct new narratives. Her work has been exhibited widely in Austria, Germany, New Zealand, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Afghanistan, Italy, India, Japan, France, Switzerland, Finland and her home countries of Pakistan and Australia. Most recently she was exhibited at the Kunst Historisches Museum, Vienna, Austria as well as Brisbane’s QAG/GOMA. Her work has been collected widely including the British Museum, London, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Qureshi is represented by Sutton Gallery, Melbourne and is currently the artist in residence at the Lyceum Club, Melbourne.

Please Explain: Do colonial objects still hold power?

SYDNEY. SATURDAY 24 AUGUST 2019.

Program Moderator: Dr Mikala Tai

Program Speakers: Damian McDonald, Nusra Latif Qureshi, Professor Mary Roberts

4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. In this edition of Please Explain, as part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art exhibition Nusra Latif Qureshi: Strategies of Intentspeakers discuss the mobility of meaning and challenges presented by historical objects and imagery in a post-Orientalist world. Taking the work of artist Nusra Latif Qureshi and the text Networked Objects (2013) by Mary Roberts as a starting point, this discussion will ask whether Colonial objects still hold potency today in institutions and artistic practice; and investigate how artists and curators can work to challenge and engage with constructed histories of objects in shifting contexts.

Reading Recommendation: Mary Roberts, Networked Objects, 2013, Department of Art History and Film Studies, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Speaker Profiles:

| Moderator: 
| Dr Mikala Tai is the director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. As a curator, researcher, and academic specialising in contemporary Asian art, she has collaborated with local, national, and international organisations to strengthen ties between Australia and Asia. Recent curatorial projects at 4A include “The Burrangong Affray” (co-curated with Micheal Do, 2018), “Before the Rain” (2017); “I don’t want to be there when it happens” (co-curated with Kate Warren and expanded at Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts with Eugenio Viola, 2017); and “Jogja Calling” (2016). She received critical acclaim for her organization of the performance program at Art Central Hong Kong (2016 -2018). Her independent curatorial projects include “Trompe-l’œil” (Sullivan + Strumpf Singapore, 2018) “Abdullah M.I. Syed: Diving Economy—Structures” (Aicon Gallery, New York, 2017), “Closing the Gap: Contemporary Indonesian Art” (Melbourne International Fine Art, 2011), and “Yang Yongliang: On the Quiet Water” (Fortyfivedownstairs, Melbourne, 2009). Tai has taught at Monash University, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), and the University of Melbourne in both undergraduate and postgraduate programs. Tai’s writing can be found in several exhibition catalogues in addition to periodicals such as Broadsheet Journal, Art Monthly Australiasia, Photofile, Vault, and Ocula. In 2015, Tai received her PhD, focusing on the influence of the global city on China’s local art infrastructure.

| Damian McDonald’s principal research areas are firearms and edged weapons, and how they are influenced by, and influence culture, as well as their design. He is interested in health and medicine, particularly the history of the material culture of the discipline, and the ways society’s notions around health and medicine change under the continuing advances in this area. His interests also include music and musical instruments, particularly rock music and the Australian underground music scene, subcultures of the 1970s and 80s and their influences on contemporary youth culture, and the material culture of computer technology.

| Nusra Latif Qureshi (b. Lahore, Pakistan, lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) attended the National College of Arts, Lahore and completed her Masters of Fine Art at the University of Melbourne. Qureshi’s practices engages with the visual histories of the South Asian region and Australian culture, questioning conventional interpretations, pulling apart and reconfiguring the found patterns to construct new narratives. Her work has been exhibited widely in Austria, Germany, New Zealand, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Afghanistan, Italy, India, Japan, France, Switzerland, Finland and her home countries of Pakistan and Australia. Most recently she was exhibited at the Kunst Historisches Museum, Vienna, Austria as well as Brisbane’s QAG/GOMA. Her work has been collected widely including the British Museum, London, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Qureshi is represented by Sutton Gallery, Melbourne and is currently the artist in residence at the Lyceum Club, Melbourne.

| Professor Mary Roberts is the John Schaeffer Professor of Art History. She specializes in nineteenth-century British and Ottoman art with particular expertise in Orientalism, the history of artistic exchanges between the Ottoman Empire and Europe and the culture of travel. Her books include: Istanbul Exchanges. Ottomans, Orientalists and Nineteenth-century visual culture (University of California Press, 2015), Intimate Outsiders. The Harem in Ottoman and Orientalist Art and Travel Literature (Duke, 2007) and four co-edited books: The Poetics and Politics of Place. Ottoman Istanbul and British Orientalism (Pera Museum and University of Washington Press, 2011) Edges of Empire. Orientalism and Visual Culture (Blackwells, 2005), Orientalism’s Interlocutors, (Duke, 2002) and Refracting Vision. Essays on the Writings of Michael Fried (Power Publications, 2000/2012).

In Conversation: FX Harsono x Ida Lawrence

FAIRFIELD CITY MUSEUM & GALLERY – Saturday 13 July – Saturday 12 October 2019.

Join us to celebrate the opening of In Conversation: FX Harsono x Ida Lawrence, a cross-generational and cross-cultural dialogue between internationally renowned Indonesian artist FX Harsono and Australian-Indonesian artist Ida Lawrence.

Curated by Emily Rolfe and Bianca Winataputri, the exhibition presents a new body of work by Ida Lawrence alongside the seminal work, Writing in the Rain, 2011, by FX Harsono.
The exhibition is the result of a partnership between Fairfield City Museum & Gallery and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art through the 4A Curators’ Intensive Program, 2018.

The Invisible Hand – Deep Dive Discussions

SYDNEY. SATURDAY JUNE 29 2.30 PM – 3.30 PM

As part of the public programming for The Invisible Hand, 4A presents a continuation of discussion after our ‘Please Explain‘ panel, with two additional deep dive discussions highlighting the most pressing issues facing users and consumers of technology and media in the Asia-Pacific. 

Data Practice: an in-conversation with Andrea Lau and Mitchell Whitelaw

2.00 PM – 3.00 PM

Data has been called ‘the new oil’ — a valuable resource that is getting increasing attention from business, government, communities and citizens. But how might we work with data from a practical, critical and creative standpoint? Andrea Lau talks with Mitchell Whitelaw about the emerging contours of ‘data practice’, touching on models of independent practice, engaging with government and business, poetry vs functionality and cross-cultural perspectives.

About the Speakers: 

Mitchell Whitelaw is an academic, writer and practitioner with interests in digital art, design and culture, especially generative systems, data-aesthetics, and digital cultural collections. His work has appeared in journals including Leonardo, Digital Creativity, Fibreculture, and Senses and Society. His current work spans materiality, data and culture, with a practical focus on creating “generous interfaces” for digital heritage. He has worked with institutions including the State Library of NSW, the National Archives, and the National Gallery of Australia, developing innovative interfaces to their digital collections. Mitchell is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Art and Design at the Australian National University.

Andrea Lau is a data visualisation designer and co-founder and director at Small Multiples. In her role, Andrea leads the user experience and delivery of projects for Small Multiples’ government, media and innovative ASX-listed clients. She is responsible for spearheading business development, providing data visualisation direction, and educating organisations on the value of communicating stories through data. Andrea brings over ten years’ experience in digital services having worked at the ABC, Interaction Consortium and MediaSmart. With a particular interest in educating others on the power of data visualisation, she has been an instructor at General Assembly, Masterclass Tutor at Guardian News and Tutor/Lecturer at the University of Sydney. 

Designing a Participatory Economy with Cameron Tonkinwise 

3.00 PM – 4.00 PM

Interaction Design has helped create platforms that appear to seamlessly match supply-and-demand. Marketed as liberatory, these platforms have become exploitative ‘gig economies.’ It is nevertheless possible to redirect these platforms to promote more local, fairer ways of cooperatively providing services. This talk explores some of the interaction design patterns that could help establish ‘platform cooperatives.’

About the Speaker: 

Cameron Tonkinwise is a Professor, School of Design at the University of Technology, Sydney. Prior to this, he was Director of Design Studies and Doctoral Studies at the Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Design. He has previously held the role of Associate Dean Sustainability at Parsons The New School for Design and was co-Chair of the Tishman Environment and Design Center at the New School in New York, United States of America. 

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In Conversation, Xiao Lu

BRISBANE. 24 JAN 2019. 6.00PM – 8.00PM.

4A is pleased to present an in conversation with leading contemporary Chinese artist Xiao Lu, on the occasion of her first retrospective, Impossible Dialogue, at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, at The Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane.  Xiao Lu will be in dialogue with two of the exhibition’s co-curators  Claire Roberts and Xu Hong to view and discuss videos of some of the artist’s recent performance works.

The conversation will focus on Xiao Lu’s ongoing creative interest in deep emotion, extreme action and chance, and connect with broader themes including art and gender, feminism, activism and the writing of art histories.

Presented by the School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney and the exhibition Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, in association with The IMA, Brisbane.


 Acknowledgements:

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue is produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This exhibition and associated programming are supported by the Australian Government through the Australia-China Council of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship project led by Dr Claire Roberts Reconfiguring the World: China. Art. Agency. 1900s to Now(FT140100743), and the Faculty of Arts, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne.

Header Image: Xiao Lu, One, performance, 5 September 2015, Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Photograph by Lin Qijian, courtesy Xiao Lu.

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Exhibition opening: Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁: 语嘿

SYDNEY. SATURDAY 19 JAN 2019. 4.00PM

Edmund Capon AM, OBE, Chair of the Board of 4A, and

Mikala Tai, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
invite you to join us at the opening of: 

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿. 

Exhibition opening: 4-6PM, Saturday 19 January


Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿.  is the first retrospective of leading contemporary Chinese artist Xiao Lu. The exhibition is anchored by Xiao Lu’s performance work Dialogue from the landmark China/Avant-Garde exhibition at the National Art Gallery, Beijing, in February 1989. This work, in which the artist fires a gun at her own art installation, is a milestone in the development of contemporary art in China. It has also has been read as a critical turning point in China’s recent history. While Dialogue remains an iconic work of that era, it is also one of the most misunderstood pieces of contemporary Chinese art. Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿  examines Xiao Lu’s creative interest in deep emotion, extreme action, and chance. Spanning a period of 30 years, the exhibition presents significant performance works by Xiao Lu including a new commission that explores the artist’s ongoing connection to Australia.

Xiao Lu (born 1962, Hangzhou) works with performance and installation. She is a graduate of the Subsidiary School of the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing and Zhejiang Academy of Fine Arts (China Academy of Art), Hangzhou. Her graduation work Dialogue was included in the China/Avant-Garde exhibition in Beijing in 1989 and became famous after she fired a gun at it, which led to her temporary arrest and an extended period of residence in Sydney. Xiao Lu’s fictional memoir Dialogue《对话》, published in Chinese and English in 2010, exposed powerful forces affecting women artists in contemporary China. Xiao Lu’s work has been included in important international exhibitions, most recently Performer and Participant, Tate, London (2018) and Art and China After 1989: Theatre of the World, Guggenheim Museum, New York (2017), and been collected by public and private institutions including the Tate, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Taikang Insurance Group Art Collection, Beijing; and White Rabbit Collection, Sydney. Xiao Lu lives and works in Beijing and Australia.

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue is produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This exhibition and associated programming are supported by the Australian Government through the Australia-China Council of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship project led by Dr Claire Roberts Reconfiguring the World: China. Art. Agency. 1900s to Now (FT140100743), and the Faculty of Arts, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne.

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Art and Activism: Changing the Conversation

SYDNEY. SUNDAY 20 JAN 2019. 12.00 – 2.00PM

Prominent Chinese artist Xiao Lu appears in conversation with Sydney Festival Director Wesley Enoch to discuss her solo exhibition Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿 . This talk focuses on how art can be a platform for championing important debate – ultimately, reframing conversation and changing minds. This event is part of the Sydney Festival program for 2019.

Xiao Lu (born 1962, Hangzhou) works with performance and installation. She is a graduate of the Subsidiary School of the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing and Zhejiang Academy of Fine Arts (China Academy of Art), Hangzhou. Her graduation work Dialogue was included in the China/Avant-Garde exhibition in Beijing in 1989 and became famous after she fired a gun at it, which led to her temporary arrest and an extended period of residence in Sydney. Xiao Lu’s fictional memoir Dialogue《对话》, published in Chinese and English in 2010, exposed powerful forces affecting women artists in contemporary China. Xiao Lu’s work has been included in important international exhibitions, most recently Performer and Participant, Tate, London (2018) and Art and China After 1989: Theatre of the World, Guggenheim Museum, New York (2017), and been collected by public and private institutions including the Tate, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Taikang Insurance Group Art Collection, Beijing; and White Rabbit Collection, Sydney. Xiao Lu lives and works in Beijing and Australia.

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue is produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This exhibition and associated programming are supported by the Australian Government through the Australia-China Council of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship project led by Dr Claire Roberts Reconfiguring the World: China. Art. Agency. 1900s to Now (FT140100743), and the Faculty of Arts, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne.

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WORKSHOP // Hanging Out: create an illustrated wall hanging with artist Chris Yee

SYDNEY. 15 – 18 APRIL, 2019.

10.00 AM – 12.00 PM

For the April School Holidays at the Chinese Garden of Friendship, join Sydney artist Chris Yee for a special series of free illustration workshops.

Chris Yee (b. 1989, Sydney) is an East Ryde (Sydney) based artist, illustrator and designer who specialises in traditional “pen and paper” methodologies. Chris’ main influences stem and vary from manga, to rap and punk aesthetics, while also expressing a traditional graphic sensibility that echoes that architectural forms and decorative embellishments of the Chinese Garden of Friendship.

Following from Chris’ recent exhibition at the Gardens, Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA!, which presented twelve bespoke tapestries that took visitors to the Chinese Garden of Friendship during Lunar New Year 2019 on a journey through the Gardens, discovering detailed, beautiful and humorous images at every turn.

In this workshop, small groups of participants will work with ink and marker pens to learn how to create their own motifs that reflect their interests and the imagery of the Gardens, working with templates and techniques to create their own take-home wall hanging.

For participants aged between 6-15 years, accompanied by a responsible adult.

Each workshop is free, and has all materials provided, with bookings online encouraged to ensure all participants get to complete their take-home artwork. 

Artist Biography:
Chris Yee (b. 1989, Sydney) is an East Ryde (Sydney) based artist, illustrator and designer who specialises in traditional “pen and paper” methodologies. Chris’ main influences stem and vary from 90’s post- apocalyptic manga, rap and punk aesthet- ics. Through his imagery he constructs narratives ranging from the humorous to the monstrous and macabre. Chris’ solo exhibitions include Mad Love, 2015, Japan Foundation, Sydney; Panorama, 2015, Kind Of- Gallery, Sydney; and has participated in group and collaborative exhibitions including No Más (with Andrew Yee), 2018, Wedge Gallery, Sydney; SOFT, 2016, Superchief Gallery, Los Angeles; and Goliath Ballroom (with James Jirat Patradoon), 2015, Goodspace, Sydney. Outside his art practice, Chris is a designer who has produced work for some of Australia’s best-known brands, including VIVID Festival Sydney, Sony Australia, Samsung – Opera House, Vans, Red Bull and Gelato Messina.

Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA! was commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia, curated by Con Gerakaris, and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.

This workshop has been produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour.

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UNSW Art & Design presents at 4A: ‘Post-Colonial Wild Rhizome: Contemporary Art in Taiwan and Its Ruptures’

PLEASE NOTE THE LOCATION FOR THIS TALK HAS BEEN UPDATED:

Lecture Theatre EG02

UNSW  | Art & Design

UNSW Sydney

Paddington campus

Cnr Oxford St & Greens Rd,

Paddington, NSW 2021

 

SYDNEY. 2 MAY 2019. 6-8PM

Dr. Jow-Jiun Gong, Associate Professor and Director Doctoral Program, Art Theory and Practice, Tainan National University of the Arts (TNNUA), Tainan City, Taiwan

Moderator: Dr Veronica Tello (UNSW Art & Design)  

In this discussion, Dr. Jow-Jiun Gong will analyse the ruptures in contemporary Taiwanese art among the paradigms of European, Japanese and Chinese art histories:

“Using artworks I selected for the 2018 Taiwan Biennale as examples, I argue that the works not only reflect the logic of post-colonial thoughts in Taiwan, but they form a phenomenon which I call ‘wild rhizome’: a self-initiated, grass-root approach of the artist community to build and connect their practices outside institutions. The transformations of artists’ organizations and their diverse types of mimicry parallel the natural environment and complex historical context where these works emerge. In addition, the numerous high mountains which are the backbone of the island, as well as the oceans surrounding it, fostered the cultural diversity and possible ways of amending the colonial ruptures and trauma.”

 

Presented by UNSW | Art & Design in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

Series organisers: Prof. Paul Gladston and Dr Yu-Chieh Li.

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Image: Jun-Honn KAO, Apparatus of Topa, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

Exhibiton opening: Nusra Latif Qureshi: Strategies of Intent

SYDNEY. THURSDAY 22 AUGUST 2019. 6.00 – 8.00PM.

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
invites you to join us at the opening of: 

Nursa Latif Qureshi: Strategies of Intent

Exhibition opening: 6.00-8.00PM, Thursday 22 August

Exhibition to be opened with an address from artist, filmmaker and academic Helen Grace.

RSVP here.


Nusra Latif Qureshi’s first solo Australian institutional exhibition presents her ongoing investigation into the symbolism and assumptions embedded in art history. Reflecting on almost two decades of practice Qureshi’s attempts to undermine, shift and negate historical imagery reads as a warning for the contemporary age, where assumed realities can be little more than constructed visions.

Qureshi’s practice is characterised by meticulous layering, fragmentation, erasure and juxtaposition of visual material. Through such intervention, she investigates little known histories of colonial eras, questions established narratives and engages with the politics of representation. Through an examination of the visual histories of the South Asian region Qureshi has developed a new visual vernacular in which to examine and interrogate the act of historicisation.

Strategies of Intent brings together key works from Qureshi’s oeuvre as well as a series of new commissions by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. These commissions are Qureshi’s most ambitious to date and include a series of installations that draw on key colonial imagery, engage with the reverence of weaponry and critique the museological convention of collecting and ownership.


About the artist:
Nusra Latif Qureshi (b. Lahore, Pakistan, lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) attended the National College of Arts, Lahore and completed her Masters of Fine Art at the University of Melbourne. Qureshi’s practices engages with the visual histories of the South Asian region and Australian culture, questioning conventional interpretations, pulling apart and reconfiguring the found patterns to construct new narratives. Her work has been exhibited widely in Austria, Germany, New Zealand, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Afghanistan, Italy, India, Japan, France, Switzerland, Finland and her home countries of Pakistan and Australia. Most recently she was exhibited at the Kunst Historisches Museum, Vienna, Austria as well as Brisbane’s QAG/GOMA. Her work has been collected widely including the British Museum, London, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Qureshi is represented by Sutton Gallery, Melbourne and is currently the artist in residence at the Lyceum Club, Melbourne.

About our opening speaker:
Helen Grace is a new media artist, filmmaker, writer and academic interested in the nexus between art & politics, memory and history. Her work has played an active role in the development of art, cinema, photography, cultural studies and education in Australia and regionally for 30 years. Grace’s work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; and has been exhibited internationally in Hong Kong, the US, the UK, France, Spain and Finland. She recently completed a major new video installation, entitled The Housing Question in collaboration with Narelle Jubelin.  The work is currently exhibited at Penrith Regional Gallery, Home of the Lewers Bequest.

Grace is the author of Culture, Aesthetics and Affect in Ubiquitous Media: The Prosaic Image, (Routledge, 2014) and she co-edited (with Amy Chan Kit-Sze and Wong Kin Yuen) Technovisuality: Cultural Re-Enchantment and the Experience of Technology (IB Tauris, 2016). She was Founding Director of the MA Programme in Visual Culture Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and is now Adjunct Professor in the Department of Cultural and Religious Studies at CUHK and an associate in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies, at the University of Sydney. She is a member of the Film Advisory Panel of Sydney International Film Festival, where she focuses on Asian and independent cinema.

#StrategiesofIntent @4a_Aus
www.4a.com.au


 

Opening: 4AA4 2019

SYDNEY. FRIDAY 4 OCT, 2019. 6.00 – 10.00PM

RSVP here.

Artists: to be announced soon, but works anonymous until sold.

After a five-year hiatus our celebrated fundraising exhibition 4A A4 returns in 2019 as a weekend-long event. 

Challenging local and international, emerging and established artists to create works of A4 size, 4A’s new and existing networks will come together to support the institution. This is your opportunity to expand your collection with unique pieces from leading international artists and the next big thing, all for the price of $200. What will catch your eye?

Here’s how it works:

4A A4 is an exhibition, fundraiser and event that offers A4-sized artworks for sale, each selling at a fixed price of $200. With all works donated by 4A’s extended family of artist supporters, pieces will be hung and sold anonymously, and names of artists will only be revealed after their works are sold.

Here’s how to get involved:

Artists:

If you would like to donate an A4-sized artwork we would love to include your work as part of 4A A4. All works will be accepted: this is a celebration of the breadth and diversity of 4As artistic family.

Click here to download the contribution form, and email hello@4a.com.au to register your interest, and we will provide details on how to contribute.

We invite you to exercise your creativity with regards to the material and medium of the work as long as you keep within the A4 size limit. All works will be hung and sold anonymously, and names of artists will only be revealed after their works are sold, with much fanfare!

As this is a fundraiser for 4A – a non-profit organisation, we are asking artists to contribute their works for this exhibition in exchange for the obvious glory of being involved, and a couple of free drinks at the opening night party. All works will be sold at a fixed price of $200.

For our wider 4A network:
If you aren’t able to contribute an artwork we would still love you to participate in 4A A4. Please, spread the word by sharing our posts on social media with the hashtag #4AA4, and, most importantly, be ready to join us on Friday October 4 (or over the exhibition weekend from October 4-6) to snap up a mystery work. Be warned though – past 4A A4 sales have been very competitive!

Join us for opening night:
4A A4 Opening Night
6-10PM
Friday 4 October 2019.
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
181-187 Hay St, Haymarket

RSVP HERE.

Exhibition opening: John Vea: If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back?

SYDNEY. THURSDAY 24 OCTOBER, 2019. 6.00 – 8.00PM.

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
invites you to join us at the opening of: 

John Vea: If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back?

Exhibition opening: 6.00-8.00PM, Thursday 24 October.
RSVP here


John Vea’s Australian debut examines the complex labour flow throughout our region. Continuing his exploration of pacific migrant workers his practice is anchored by his signature wit and humour that challenges viewers to consider the equality and validity of a global workforce.

Vea’s practice has been defined by a journalist-like investigation into how workers from Moana Nui a Kiwa (the Pacific Ocean) have been co-opted as labour for both Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia. Anchored by a series of talanoa (conversations) Vea’s work prefaces the voice and lived experience of the migrant worker employed within dominant and authoritative social structures. These discussions inform how Vea scaffolds his practice and locates his work as a means to examine the overlooked and the underrepresented.

In the contemporary globalised era migrant labour has emerged as a key indicator of regional socio-economic relationships.  Labourers from Moana Nui a Kiwa have been subordinated by both Australia and New Zealand to support both agricultural production and urban development. Specific schemes such as Recognised Seasonal Employment (RSE) in New Zealand grants season migrant workers temporary entry to plant, harvest and pack crops in exchanged for minimum wage. On completion of the designated work they are immediately returned home; their contributions to the success and prosperity of New Zealand’s economy barely noticed or acknowledged. Vea uses polices such as the RSE as a basis from which to work, his crafted responses are sometimes humorous but always compelling counterpoints to dominant perspectives and the status quo.

If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back? is John Vea’s first comprehensive international solo exhibition presenting recent significant works alongside a new commission from 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This commission will be developed as a reflection of a year-long research project into the history of 4A’s locale in Haymarket, Sydney. As a site for trade and exchange on the banks of the harbor, the area now known as Haymarket has played an important role for the communities that have resided here for centuries.

 

 

 

John Vea: If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back? includes new performance and installation works commissioned by Performance Space and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

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John Vea: If I pick your fruit, will you put mine back?  is powered by Lūpa, a media player for art galleries. More information at lupaplayer.com 

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