Dean Cross: Monuments

SYDNEY

13 AUG – 1 OCT 2020

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

181-187 Hay St, Haymarket, Sydney, NSW

 Monuments is a site-responsive work by artist Dean Cross– an ongoing project since 2016, intended for exhibition every two years. Handfuls of white ochre – consisting Ngunnawal/Ngambri Country where the artist was born and raised and gathered on their property with permission from local elder and custodian of the land Aunty Matilda House – build a grid that spreads across the gallery floors.  A number of the ‘monuments’ are interspersed with gold leaf. With each handful representing one year of colonisation in Australia, Cross’ Monuments to strength, survival and custodianship challenge colonial concepts of ceramics, memorialisation and memory. Says Cross: “A Western statue is a depiction; my monuments are the real thing”[1].

Monuments is exhibiting at 4A in 2020 as a precursor and grounding work to 2021 4A exhibition Drawn by stones. Drawn by stones brings together artists who utilise the ceramic medium to interrogate contested histories, stolen land, Indigenous sovereignty, and concepts of national identity. In 2021, exhibiting artists from Australia, Hong Kong and Taiwan will further investigate the creation of a sense of ‘nationhood’ through ceramics, demonstrating how the medium can both memorialise and tell alternative histories.

 Dean Cross was born and raised on Ngunnawal/Ngambri Country and is of Worimi descent. He is a trans-disciplinary artist primarily working across installation, sculpture and photography. His career began in contemporary dance, performing and choreographing nationally and internationally for over a decade with Australia’s leading dance companies. Following that Cross re-trained as a visual artist, attaining his Bachelor’s degree from Sydney College of the Arts, and his First Class Honours from the ANU School of Art and Design.

Cross has shown his work extensively across Australia. This includes the exhibiting of Monuments as part of the 2018 Indigenous Ceramic Prize at the Shepparton Art Museum, curated by Anna Briers and Belinda Briggs; Tarnanthi at the Art Gallery of South Australia, curated by Nici Cumpston (2017); RUNS DEEP a solo show at Alaska Projects, Sydney (2018); The Churchie Emerging Art Prize (2016); The Redlands Konica Minolta Art Prize (2015); and the Macquarie Group Emerging Art Prize (2015) where his work was awarded the Highly Commended prize by artist Joan Ross. In 2020, Cross has staged solo exhibitions I LOVE YOU. I’M SORRY at Firstdraft Gallery, and A Sullen Perfume at Yavuz Gallery. Cross has also exhibited at Outerspace, Brisbane; Alaska Projects; the Australian Centre for Photography, Sydney, as a part of the NEXTWAVE Festival Melbourne, with curator Amelia Winata; and at Artbank, Sydney in Talia Smith’s In a World of Wounds. Dean was also selected to be a part of the 4A Beijing Studio Residency Program in Beijing, China in 2018. Dean’s work has been collected extensively and is held in significant public and private collections including the National Gallery of Victoria, The Art Gallery of South Australia, The Queensland University of Technology Art Museum, and the Canberra Museum and Gallery. He is represented by Yavuz Gallery, Sydney and Singapore.

[1] Cross, Dean, quoted in “Of Salt and Ochre: Contemporary Clay and Kinship with Country”, Briers, A and Briggs, B, The Journal of Australian Ceramics, July 2018.

Holding Patterns

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

9 JUL – 23 OCT 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. These exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien Situ, Crossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

Referring to the aeronautical manoeuvre of an airplane forced to delay its landing procedure to avoid potential disaster, a holding pattern suggests divergence from an established routine and the suspension of normalcy. Crucially, it is an action of adaptability: a pilot executing specific turns whilst accounting for wind speed and direction to establish its course. The pattern achieves seemingly limitless flight, looping until given permission to commence its landing operations, once again returning to earth and reality. It is in this moment of suspension that we find ourselves undertaking our own rituals of contemplation, addressing our own pathways forward in a time of stillness.

For the exhibiting artists COVID-19 has been an unexpected intervention, a force majeure. Forced out of their routines, artists have now been given opportunities to reflect on what it means to be creatively-engaged during a time of crisis. Contemplating artistic practice with the arts industry shut down, Holding Patterns demonstrates the resilience and ingenuity of artists during this time.. Some have taken time to rest and recharge, quietly laying projects to rest to make way for new ideas, while others have pivoted to hone their craft. 

Through textiles, sculptures, metallurgy, drawing and painting, the artists of Holding Patterns deftly navigate cultural histories, identities, object permanence and transmutation through process-based practice. As the first exhibiting artist, Kien Situ creates architecturally-informed sculptures of domestic and sacred objects and furniture rendered with obscurity in form, function and material. The complex ‘interknot’ technique of Crossing Threads® embraces compositional tension and release in the contrasting tones and textures of their lyrical, abstracted pieces. Shireen Taweel modernises the traditional art of copper-smithing to create pieces that blur the line between jewellery and sculpture, opening dialogues of shared histories and relationships between communities of fluid identities. Sofiyah Ruqayah’s indeterminate forms draw upon mutations of human and non-human realities, generating connections between tangible bodies and aetheric dreams and spirit worlds informed by cultural myths of embodiment.

Fusing together their own creative impulses within traditional methods, these artists make mass departures from ‘normal’ culturally-concerned art making. It is within these strays from tradition and the ‘expected’ that new cultural dialogues can begin to emerge, representing the hybridity of Asian-Australian contemporary art practice. By merging traditional Asian techniques and labour-intensive processes, Holding Patterns relishes in craftsmanship and provides opportunities to glimpse the artists’ material worlds of contemplation and stillness, offering momentary suspension from our own holding patterns.


Artist Biographies:

Kien Situ (b. 1990, Sydney) is a sculpture and installation artist meditating on memory, cultural amnesia and identity in relation to the aesthetics of constructed objects and environments. Drawing upon familiar spatial, formal, textural, tectonic and material experience of his East Asian upbringing, Kien utilises and dissects his Eurocentric architectural education to create objects which reinterpret formative aesthetic and sensory experiences obfuscated by a diasporic childhood. His works are a physical melding of this experience, casting industrial gypsum cement with the regional, “artistic” material of Chinese Mò ink, a material central to the artist’s practice as part of the investigation into the symbiotic relationship between geography, place and identity.

Crossing Threads® is the collaborative work of Australian-born sisters of Filipino heritage Lauren Hernandez (b. 1988, Sydney) and Kass Hernandez (b. 1989, Sydney). These self-taught tapestry artists first explored the practice of weaving in early 2015 by attending a beginner’s workshop. Known for their large-scale and highly textural handwoven pieces, the Hernandez sisters seek to emulate the natural forms found in nature. Their carefully curated fibre selections include Australian Merino wool, plant-based fibres, up-cycled/dead-stock fabrics and other foraged items that aren’t traditionally used in fibre art. Their practice has led them to develop their recognisable ‘interknot’ technique, made up of intertwining hand-knotted chains of varying texture and thickness which graduate to a relief. The artists continually draw spiritual inspiration from their surrounding landscapes and personal experiences and are materialised through their abstract designs.

Shireen Taweel (b. 1990, Bankstown, lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is a multimedia installation artist whose work broaches issues of the construction of cultural heritage, knowledge and identity through language and the constantly shifting public space of the social, political and religious axiom. Her artistic practice draws from the personal experiences of being Lebanese Australian living between cultures, and how the physical spaces within her community reflect a complex cultural landscape of transformation expressed through hybridity and plurality. The project development of Shireen’s works are often site-specific, weaving local narratives and research with a focus on experimentation in material and sound through site. Shireen’s constant acquisition of traditional coppersmith artisan skills is a research vessel for community focused conceptual development, and through a progressive application of the collected artisan techniques and a manipulation of the traditional acts of making that leads to possibilities of cross-cultural discourse opening dialogues of shared histories and fluid community identities. 

Sofiyah Ruqayah (b. 1992, Sydney) is a Sydney-based artist working across drawing, installation, collage and painting to explore the strange territories between human and nonhuman realities. She is interested in themes of mutation, dream and spirit worlds. Drawing upon imagined and felt connections between various bodies, presences and memories, as well familial and cultural myths of embodiment, Sofiyah’s practice invites us to speculate on our nonhuman origins and intertwined fates. In 2020, Sofiyah is undertaking a 12-month studio residency at Parramatta Artists’ Studios, and will present her first solo exhibition at 4A in October, as part of the Holding Patterns exhibition series. She has exhibited both locally and internationally, including group exhibitions at Lubov Gallery (New York), Peacock Gallery (Sydney) and at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (Sydney) with Woven Kolektif, a collective of emerging Australian artists with personal ties to Indonesia.

 


Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

6 – 30 AUGUST 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. Curated by Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi, these exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien SituCrossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

View the Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads roomsheet here.

View the Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads wall labels here.


To coincide with the exhibition, 4A presented an Instagram Live talk on 16 August with artists and sisters Lauren Hernandez and Kass Hernandez, who work under the collaborative name Crossing Threads. Holding Patterns curator Con Gerakaris spoke with the duo about the socio-cultural, environmental and familial stories that inform their practice, as well as the interesting materials and methods that make up the multi-textural works on display at 4A. This live-streamed talk was recorded in our Haymarket gallery and is part of our 4A TALKS series.

Watch the Instagram Live talk HERE.

Listen to the talk below.


Crossing Threads® is the collaborative work of Australian-born sisters of Filipino heritage Lauren Hernandez (b. 1988, Sydney) and Kass Hernandez (b. 1989, Sydney). These self-taught tapestry artists first explored the practice of weaving in early 2015 by attending a beginner’s workshop. Known for their large-scale and highly textural handwoven pieces, the Hernandez sisters seek to emulate the natural forms found in nature. Their carefully curated fibre selections include Australian Merino wool, plant-based fibres, up-cycled/dead-stock fabrics and other foraged items that aren’t traditionally used in fibre art. Their practice has led them to develop their recognisable ‘interknot’ technique, made up of intertwining hand-knotted chains of varying texture and thickness which graduate to a relief. The artists continually draw spiritual inspiration from their surrounding landscapes and personal experiences and are materialised through their abstract designs.


Exhibition Documentation: 

All images: Kai Wasikowski

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Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®: (Back Right): THE DIVIDE, 2020, alpaca, bamboo, canvas, cotton, cotton roping, felted Merino wool, hand cut denim, hand cut leather, hand dyed raffia, hand dyed Shibori, hemp, linen, marine roping, Merino wool, mixed natural fibres, Pima cotton; suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel; handwoven by Kass HernandezLeft Wall Right: Crossing Threads, Consolation, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, handspun upcycled yarn, hemp, leather, linen and mixed natural fibres framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Kass Hernandez,  courtesy the artists.

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Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®: (Back Right): THE DIVIDE (detail), 2020, alpaca, bamboo, canvas, cotton, cotton roping, felted Merino wool, hand cut denim, hand cut leather, hand dyed raffia, hand dyed Shibori, hemp, linen, marine roping, Merino wool, mixed natural fibres, Pima cotton; suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel; handwoven by Kass Hernandez, courtesy the artists. 

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Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®: (Back Right): THE DIVIDE (detail), 2020, alpaca, bamboo, canvas, cotton, cotton roping, felted Merino wool, hand cut denim, hand cut leather, hand dyed raffia, hand dyed Shibori, hemp, linen, marine roping, Merino wool, mixed natural fibres, Pima cotton; suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel; handwoven by Kass Hernandezcourtesy the artists. 

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Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020, courtesy of the artists. 

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Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®, UNDER MY SKIN (detail view), 2020, Bamboo, chenille, Egyptian cotton, hemp, Japanese silk, jute, leather, linen, merino wool, mulberry tussah, raffia and wire on galvanised steel frame Handwoven by Lauren and Kass Hernandez, photo: Kai Wasikowski, image courtesy of the artists. 

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Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®, UNDER MY SKIN, 2020, Bamboo, chenille, Egyptian cotton, hemp, Japanese silk, jute, leather, linen, merino wool, mulberry tussah, raffia and wire on galvanised steel frame Handwoven by Lauren and Kass Hernandez, courtesy of the artists.

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Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®: (Back Right): THE DIVIDE, 2020, alpaca, bamboo, canvas, cotton, cotton roping, felted Merino wool, hand cut denim, hand cut leather, hand dyed raffia, hand dyed Shibori, hemp, linen, marine roping, Merino wool, mixed natural fibres, Pima cotton; suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel; handwoven by Kass HernandezLeft Wall Right: Crossing Threads, Consolation, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, handspun upcycled yarn, hemp, leather, linen and mixed natural fibres framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Kass Hernandez,  courtesy the artists. 

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Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020, Kass Hernandez of Crossing Threads® with the following works: (Left) Crossing Threads®, Seek, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, hemp, Japanese silk and paper, linen, mixed natural fibres and sari silk framed in Tasmanian oa. Handwoven by Lauren Hernandez. (Right) Crossing Threads®, Consolation, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, handspun upcycled yarn, hemp, leather, linen and mixed natural fibres framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Kass Hernandez.

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Image: Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. From Left: Crossing Threads®, Seek, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, hemp, Japanese silk and paper, linen, mixed natural fibres and sari silk framed in Tasmanian oa. Handwoven by Lauren Hernandez. Centre: Crossing Threads®, Consolation, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, handspun upcycled yarn, hemp, leather, linen and mixed natural fibres framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Kass Hernandez. Right: Crossing Threads®, Inward State, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, hemp, Japanese silk and paper, linen, mixed natural fibres and sari silk framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Lauren Hernandez, courtesy the artists. 

Return to Holding Patterns exhibition page

Holding Patterns: Kien Situ

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

9 JULY – 2 AUG 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. Curated by Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi, these exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien SituCrossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

View the Holding Patterns: Kien Situ roomsheet here.

View the Holding Patterns: Kien Situ wall labels here.

Listen to Kien Situ in conversation with John Choi (Founding Partner, CHROFI) here:

Kien Situ (b. 1990, Sydney) is a sculpture and installation artist meditating on memory, cultural amnesia and identity in relation to the aesthetics of constructed objects and environments. Drawing upon familiar spatial, formal, textural, tectonic and material experience of his East Asian upbringing, Kien utilises and dissects his Eurocentric architectural education to create objects which reinterpret formative aesthetic and sensory experiences obfuscated by a diasporic childhood. His works are a physical melding of this experience, casting industrial gypsum cement with the regional, “artistic” material of Chinese Mò ink, a material central to the artist’s practice as part of the investigation into the symbiotic relationship between geography, place and identity.


Exhibition Documentation:

All images: Kai Wasikowski

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Kien Situ, Shanshui (Wall Plate), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 48 x 48 x 8cm. Courtesy the artist.

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Kien Situ, Shanshui (Wall Plate), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 48 x 48 x 8cm. Courtesy the artist.

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Kien Situ, Shanshui (Stele), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 128 x 64 x 32cm. Courtesy the artist.

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Holding Patterns Part One: Kien Situ (installation view) Left: Kien Situ, Shanshui (Wall Plate), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 48 x 48 x 8cm. Centre: Kien Situ, Shanshui (Scroll), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 88 x 64 x 8cm. Right: Kien Situ, Shanshui (Column), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 136 x 24 x 24cm. Courtesy the artist.

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Holding Patterns Part One: Kien Situ (installation view) Front, Kien Situ, Shanshui (Column), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 136 x 24 x 24cm. Back left: Kien Situ, Shanshui (Scroll), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 88 x 64 x 8cm. Courtesy the artist.

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Holding Patterns Part One: Kien Situ (installation view). Courtesy the artist.

Return to Holding Patterns exhibition page

Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

3 – 25 SEPTEMBER 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. Curated by Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi, these exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien SituCrossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

View the Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel roomsheet here.

View the Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel wall labels here.

Watch or download a transcript of 4A TALKS // Shireen Taweel & Reina Takeuchi here.


Shireen Taweel (b. 1990, Bankstown, lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is a multimedia installation artist whose work broaches issues of the construction of cultural heritage, knowledge and identity through language and the constantly shifting public space of the social, political and religious axiom. Her artistic practice draws from the personal experiences of being Lebanese Australian living between cultures, and how the physical spaces within her community reflect a complex cultural landscape of transformation, expressed through hybridity and plurality. The project development of Shireen’s works are often site-specific, weaving local narratives and research with a focus on experimentation in material and sound through site. Shireen’s constant acquisition of traditional coppersmith artisan skills is a research vessel for community-focused conceptual development, and through a progressive application of the collected artisan techniques and a manipulation of the traditional acts of making that leads to possibilities of cross-cultural discourse, opening dialogues of shared histories and fluid community identities.


Exhibition Documentation: 

All images: Kai Wasikowski

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Holding Patterns Part 3: Shireen Taweel (Installation view), photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

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Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’, 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

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Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’ (detail), 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

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Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’ (detail), 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

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Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’, 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

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Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’ (detail), 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

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Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’, 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

Return to Holding Patterns exhibition page

Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

1 – 23 OCTOBER 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. Curated by Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi, these exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien SituCrossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

Sofiyah Ruqayah (b. 1992, Sydney) is a Sydney-based artist working across drawing, installation, collage and painting to explore the strange territories between human and nonhuman realities. She is interested in themes of mutation, dream and spirit worlds. Drawing upon imagined and felt connections between various bodies, presences and memories, as well as familial and cultural myths of embodiment, Sofiyah’s practice invites us to speculate on our nonhuman origins and intertwined fates. In 2020, Sofiyah is undertaking a 12-month studio residency at Parramatta Artists’ Studios and will present her first solo exhibition at 4A in October, as part of the Holding Patterns exhibition series. She has exhibited both locally and internationally, including group exhibitions at Lubov Gallery (New York), Peacock Gallery (Sydney) and at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (Sydney) with Woven Kolektif, a collective of emerging Australian artists with personal ties to Indonesia.


Return to Holding Patterns exhibition page

Phaptawan Suwannakudt: Turtles, a Fish, and Ghosts…

July 5th to July 27th 2002

Turtles, a Fish, and Ghosts... is a solo exhibition featuring works by artist Phaptawan Suwannakudt.

Artist’s Statement:

I have worked on mural projects in temples and other public spaces during the fifteen years before I moved to Australia in 1996.  My works had largely been involved with Buddhist themes such as the Life of the Buddha or the Narratives of Buddha’s Previous Lives.  Now I live and work in Australia, my works have changed accordingly.  They involve more of my own experience and personal life.

The work is the exhibition Turtles, a Fish and Ghosts… are from 1999-2002.  They include earlier work about the lives of the Buddha in which I chose to work on a six-panel screen instead of on the wall.

The other works are later and reflect my experience in Australia.  The four sets of triptychs, Earth, Wind, Water, and Fire depict my reaction to Australian scenes through the interpretation of Thai pictorial elements.  The division of subject matter in these works is as if we are looking out through the window from the inside of a temple.  This view comes from my habit of looking out at things when I had to work mural paintings around the door and window space on the temple wall.

Another group of works from the same period reflects on my life in the past, recorded as a memory flash-back.  One pair of paintings is about my brother’s ordination which took place not long before moving to Australia.  The other pair records my experience at nine years of age when I was mesmerized by a grand Buddhist ceremony in a Thai temple, with monks chanting for days and nights over rows of hundreds and thousands of newly cast Buddha statues.

The exhibition Turtles, a Fish and Ghosts… shows the transition of my work when moving into another country, as well as sees the possibility of using skill in narrative painting for a new and different way of looking.


Acknowledgements

This project has been assisted by the Commonwealth Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Thanks also go to Sherman Galleries, Roslyn Oxley Gallery, Robert Lindsay Gallery, Span Galleries and Gallery 4A.

Phaptawan Suwannakudt is represented by Span Galleries, Melbourne.

Outside the Real

15-24 October 1998

Curator: Huang Du

Artists: Cai Guoqiang, Li Yongbin and Zhang Peili

Outside the Real: A New Form of Video Art in China featured works by Cai Guoqiang, Li Yongbin and Zhang Peili. Curator Huang Du referred to these artists as ‘cultural wizards’, whose practices explore methods of viewing and production outside of the standards of a social realist framework. 

MAKE-DO GARDEN CITY

25 March – 15 May 2010

Artists: Tessa Zettel & Karl Khoe

Make-do Garden City examines the past histories of the Haymarket precinct and imagines its possible futures in the context of food crisis and urban sustainability. Artists Zettle and Khoe seeks to plant a new type of temporary garden on the site of 4A, where over six weeks, the Make Garden mobile workshop will grow a variety of edible plants for distribution to participants and to feed gallery staff.

Jews of Shanghai: Horst Eisfelder

8 February – 9 March 2002

Jews of Shanghai was an exhibition of photographs by Horst Eisfelder, charting his experience as a refugee in Shanghai after the Second World War. Jews are not commonly associated with China, yet by the mid-1930s, a flourishing Jewish community had emerged in the port city of Shanghai, and by 1942 the Jewish community had numbered over 18,000. Horst Eisfelder was thirteen years old when he arrived in Shanghai in 1938 with his family as Jewish refugees from Germany. The young Eisfelder took the photographs in this exhibition over a nine-year period. Now based in Melbourne, Eisfelder’s experience if diaspora and migration and its candid documentation adds to our understanding of Australia’s diverse social history.

This exhibition was part of the Sydney Jewish Museum‘s Crossroads: Shanghai and the Jews of China project.

Fundraising Exhibition

May – June 2003

4A’s annual fundraising exhibition.

Artists: Marion Borgelt, Jon Cattapan, Zhong Chen, Maria Cruz, Dacchi Dang, Anne Ferran, Emil Goh, Rowena Gough, Cherry Hood, Shen Jiawei, Lindy Lee, Victoria Lobregat, Deborah Paauwe, David Serisier, Sally Smart, Phaptawan Suwannakudt, Laurens Tan, My Le Thi, Blanche Tilden, Fan Dong Wan, Guan Wei, Ah Xian, Liu Xiao Xian, William Yang, John Yang, Anne Sahalka, Gang Zhao, Kate Beyton, Cherine Fahd, David Griggs, Nell, Sangeeta Sandrasegar, Aaron Seeto, Renee So, Selina Ou, Andrea Tu

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Nightvision I-IV

Nightvision is a project that consists of public screenings of video art involving emerging artists and curators in a series of four exhibitions of short and silent video works. Presented outside the Gallery 4A’s exhibition hours, rear-projected in the gallery’s ground floor window, the exhibition will be screened sunset to sunrise on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays over a period of a few weeks.

The projected videos will expose people who may be unfamiliar with contemporary art to the activities of young video artists from around the country and around the world. This project aimed to engage, support and promote young artists and to develop audiences for contemporary art that uses modern technology.

Nightvision I: Airfreight Copy

February – March 2003

Artists: Go Watanabe, Renaud Bezy

Curator: Emil Goh

Nightvision II: Puncture Capital

March – April 2003

Artists: Patrick Abboud, Catriona McKenzie, The Boat People

Curator: Amanda Cacchia

Nightvision III: Really Reel

April – May 2003

Artists: Kate Just, Chloe Salvaris, DAMP, Muto Isamu, Yoshida Hikari, Sawanobori Kyoko (N-Mark Japan), Dion Sanderson

Curator: Larissa Hjorth

Nightvision IV: The Long

May – June 2003

Artists: Brad Hammond, Paula Wong, Samantha Rath, Cecelia Huynh, Luke Butterworth

Curator: Aaron Seeto

4A Members’ Exhibition 2005

8 December – 17 December 2005

Artists: Cate Norton, Catherine Cloran, Eduardo Lopex- Valdezpino, Elke Wohlfahrt, Fan Dongwang, Jennifer Jackson, Jenny Yan Jun Wassell, Jonathan Vencore, Josephine Seyfried, Juliana O’Dean, Megan Jones, Nathalie Hartong-Gautier, Zara Collins

Open to all members of the Asian Australian Artists Association, this annual fundraising show provided an opportunity for both emerging and established artists to showcase new or existing work across a range of mediums including photography, painting, sculpture and installation.

Asian Traffic Shenzhen

15 December 2005 – 18 February 2006

OCTA, Contemporary Art Centre, Shenzhen

Artist: Ma Chu

Curator: Huang Zhuan

In 2004, 4A embarked on an ambitious exhibition project called Asian Traffic. Curated by Binghui Huangfu, this multi-chapter exhibition included the work of key Asian artists working in the region in an exhibition which marked out some of the shifting concerns of artists at the beginning of this century. The exhibition had a geographic reach that spread throughout Asia, and in 2005 developed into a major international touring project.

Still Away

3 November – 3 December 2005

Artists: Phaptawan Suwannakudt (Australia), Michael Shaowanasai (US), Navin Raiwanchaikul (Japan)

Still Away was a complimentary parallel event to a major Thai contemporary art exhibition held at the Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW). The exhibition at AGNSW featured a large cross section of the vibrant contemporary art movement that was developing in Thailand. This exhibition was produced by AGNSW with 4A as part of our ongoing partnership philosophy. The two exhibitions focused on diasporic elements of Thai contemporary art.

It appears to be a peculiar phenomena of Thai contemporary art that whilst most of its practitioners have travelled and studied overseas, most seem to base their practice back in Thailand. In the complementary exhibition at 4A, the artists involved addressed what it means to be Thai while remaining outside of Thailand.

Asian Traffic Shanghai

22 October – 30 November, 2005

Zendai Museum of Modern Art, Shanghai 

Artists: Huang Kui, Jin Feng, Jin Shan, Su Wenxiang, Tang Maohong, Arahmaiani, Shoufay Derz, Katherine Huang, Yoko Kajio, Shigeyuki Kihara, Jae Hoon Lee, Owen Leong, Leung Mee Ping, Koky Saly, Sangeeta Sandrasegar, Michael Shaowanasai, Renee So, Kijeong Song, Manit Sriwanichpoom, Suzann Victor, Keith Wong, Mahmoud Yekta, Wang Zhiyuan

In 2004, 4A embarked on an ambitious exhibition project called Asian Traffic. Curated by Binghui Huangfu, this multi-chapter exhibition included the work of key Asian artists working in the region in an exhibition which marked out some of the shifting concerns of artists at the beginning of this century. The exhibition had a geographic reach that spread throughout Asia, and in 2005 developed into a major international touring project.

Asian Traffic Beijing

1 September – 15 September, 2005

Today Art Museum, Beijing 

Conference: Transnational Culture2 September

Artists: Shigeyuki Kihara, Michael Shaowanasai, Renee So, Kijeong Song, Manit Sriwanichpoom, Suzann Victor, Keith Wong, Mahmoud Yekta, Wang Zhiyuan

Curator: Leng Lin

In 2004, 4A embarked on an ambitious exhibition project called Asian Traffic. Curated by Binghui Huangfu, this multi-chapter exhibition included the work of key Asian artists working in the region in an exhibition which marked out some of the shifting concerns of artists at the beginning of this century. The exhibition had a geographic reach that spread throughout Asia, and in 2005 developed into a major international touring project.

Asian Traffic Singapore

18 June – 12 July, 2005

Esplanade-Theatres on the Bay, Singapore

Symposium: Artistic Practise in the Third Space, 19 June

Artists: Koky Saly, Renee So, Mahmoud Yekta, Sangeeta Sandrasegar, Leung Mee Ping, Michael Shaowanasai, Manit Sriwanichpoom, Emily Chua, Michael Lee

In 2004, 4A embarked on an ambitious exhibition project called Asian Traffic. Curated by Binghui Huangfu, this multi-chapter exhibition included the work of key Asian artists working in the region in an exhibition which marked out some of the shifting concerns of artists at the beginning of this century. The exhibition had a geographic reach that spread throughout Asia, and in 2005 developed into a major international touring project.

Open Letter

Emil Goh, ‘Remake (Ring),’ 2004. DVD video, 1’56”, installation view.

 

Phase One: 10 March – 10 April, 2005

Artists: Dadang Christanto, Selina Ou, Vienna Parreno, Koky Saly

Phase Two: 14 April – 28 May, 2005

Artists: Emil Goh, George Poonkhin Khut + John Tonkin, Melissa Ramos, Phaptawan Suwannakudt, My Le Thi, Suzann Victor

A one-day symposium was held on 9 April.

Open Letter celebrated ten years of Australian involvement in ASEAN. Developed in conjunction with Asialink, the exhibition travelled to 9 ASEAN countries with the aim of highlighting the ASEAN group’s cultural connections with Australia. The artists involved are all Asian-Australians with ethnic origins in ASEAN member countries, representing many variations on themes of migration. Some explored their artist journeys, while others presented the conflicts, challenges and successes that form part of their experience of displacement, exile and diaspora. The exhibition also provided opportunities for the artists to report back to their cultures of origin about their artistic journeys.

International Tour:

Bangkok: 5 August – 30 September, National Gallery

Manila: 5 October – 5 November, Metropolitan Museum

Kuala Lumpur: 14 February – 16 April 2006, National Art Gallery

 

 

Game

4 Feburary – 5 March, 2005

Artist: Liu Xiao Xian

Game opened the 2005 program of the Asia Australia Art Centre coinciding with the Chinese New Year Celebrations. The project involved the exhibition of works by emerging Australian artist Liu Xiao Xian ranging from photographs, sculpture and installation pieces.

The exhibition explored Liu Xiao Xian’s practice reflecting his experience of being Chinese outside of China. He achieves this in his works through an almost poetic exploration of history that incorporated historical images such as nineteenth century stereo photographs. This is reflected in the works exhibited entitled My Other Lives, which are large stereoscopic photographs of famous cities around the world with the artist inserting his own visage in the imagery. A key concern of this work is to render visible the presence of Asian-Australians within the dominant narratives of Australian history by providing a cultural and visual discussion of what it means to live both ‘in’ and ‘out’ of Australia and China.

Eugenia Lim: The Ambassador – Touring

NAUTILUS ARTS CENTRE, PORT LINCOLN, SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 19 APRIL – 1 JUNE 2019.

Venue: 66 Tasman Terrace, Port Lincoln, Eyre Peninsula, South Australia, 5606

The Ambassador presents three distinct series by Melbourne-based artist Eugenia Lim that centre upon a gold-suited figure who appears halfway between truth and fantasy. In each series, Lim transforms herself into her eponymous invented persona, the Ambassador, an insatiability curious character who traverses time and space, playfully exploring Australia’s cultural and built landscapes.

This exhibition marks the first exhibition of Eugenia Lim’s work and presents all three bodies of work together for the first time. Together, they represent a compelling and witty examination of contemporary Australia from a female, performative and Asian-Australian perspective. As the Ambassador, Lim ‘shapeshifts’ to unearth multiple dimensions of the Asian-Australian narrative – drilling down into racial politics, the social costs of manufacturing, and the role of architecture in shaping society – exploring how national identities and stereotypes cut, divide and bond our globalised world.

Curated by Mikala Tai, Director, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, The Ambassador is travelling to eight galleries and art centres across Australia between 2019 and 2021 through Museums & Galleries of NSW.

A 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Museums & Galleries of NSW touring exhibition. This project has been assisted by the Australian Government’s Visions of Australia program.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁: 语嘿

SYDNEY. 19 JANUARY – 24 MARCH 2019.

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿 is the first retrospective of leading contemporary Chinese artist Xiao Lu. The exhibition is anchored by Xiao Lu’s performance work Dialogue from the landmark China/Avant-Garde exhibition at the National Art Gallery, Beijing, in February 1989. This work, in which the artist fires a gun at her own art installation, is a milestone in the development of contemporary art in China. It has also has been read as a critical turning point in China’s recent history. While Dialogue remains an iconic work of that era, it is also one of the most misunderstood pieces of contemporary Chinese art. Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿  examines Xiao Lu’s creative interest in deep emotion, extreme action, and chance. Spanning a period of 30 years, the exhibition presents significant performance works by Xiao Lu including a new commission that explores the artist’s ongoing connection to Australia.

Xiao Lu (born 1962, Hangzhou) works with performance and installation. She is a graduate of the Subsidiary School of the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing and Zhejiang Academy of Fine Arts (China Academy of Art), Hangzhou. Her graduation work Dialogue was included in the China/Avant-Garde exhibition in Beijing in 1989 and became famous after she fired a gun at it, which led to her temporary arrest and an extended period of residence in Sydney. Xiao Lu’s fictional memoir Dialogue《对话》, published in Chinese and English in 2010, exposed powerful forces affecting women artists in contemporary China. Xiao Lu’s work has been included in important international exhibitions, most recently Performer and Participant, Tate, London (2018) and Art and China After 1989: Theatre of the World, Guggenheim Museum, New York (2017), and been collected by public and private institutions including the Tate, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Taikang Insurance Group Art Collection, Beijing; and White Rabbit Collection, Sydney. Xiao Lu lives and works in Beijing and Australia.

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue is produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This exhibition and associated programming are supported by the Australian Government through the Australia-China Council of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship project led by Dr Claire Roberts Reconfiguring the World: China. Art. Agency. 1900s to Now (FT140100743), and the Faculty of Arts, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne.

肖鲁:语嘿 是中国当代著名艺术家肖鲁的首次回顾展。展览从肖鲁1989年2月在北京中国美术馆内举办的,具有里程碑意义的中国现代艺术展上的装置行为作品《对话》——艺术家对着自己的装置开枪开始。这件作品在中国当代艺术发展中具有重要意义,被普遍认为是中国现代历史转折的文化信号,但它也成为当代中国艺术中最容易被误解的作品之一。 “肖鲁:语嘿”展示了艺术家对深层情感、极端行动和不同语境的创造发挥,同时也显示艺术家作品的鲜明特质。展览的作品跨越肖鲁30年艺术发展过程,包括一个全新的与悉尼相关的作品。通过这次回顾展,让观众探讨艺术家与澳大利亚的持续关系。

肖鲁(1962年生于杭州)从事行为表演和装置艺术。她毕业于北京的中央美术学院附属中学和杭州的浙江美术学院(中国美术学院)。她的毕业作品《对话》在1989年北京的中国现代艺术展览中展出,她在开枪后被临时拘捕,之后长期居住在悉尼。肖鲁的自传体小说《对话》中英版于2010年出版发行,此书揭露了影响当代中国女性艺术家的一股强大力量。肖鲁的作品已被选入重要的国际展览,近期包括:“表演者与参与者”,泰特,伦敦(2018年)和”1989年之后的艺术与中国:世界剧场”,纽约古根海姆博物馆(2017年)。其作品被公共和私人机构收藏,包括:伦敦泰特美术馆;纽约现代艺术博物馆;北京泰康保险集团艺术收藏;以及悉尼白兔收藏。肖鲁在北京和澳大利亚生活和工作。

“肖鲁:语嘿”由4A当代亚洲艺术中心制作和展出。本次展览及相关教育项目得到了澳大利亚政府,澳中理事会的支持、以及罗清奇博士主持的澳大利亚研究理事会(ARC)前程研究项目《重设世界:中国、艺术与动力 1900年至今》(FT140100743)和墨尔本大学文化与传播学院艺术系的支持。

Exhibition Documentation

All images: Kai Wasikowski

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Tables: China/Avant-Garde exhibition archival materials. Back: Xiao Lu, Dialogue (对话
), 1989, C-type print on vinyl, documentation of installation, and performance: 11.10am,
5 February 1989, China/Avant-Garde exhibition, National Art Gallery, Beijing. Reproduced courtesy Wen Pulin Archive of Chinese Avant-Garde Art and Xiao Lu. Projection: China/Avant-Garde exhibition, set of 210 archival 35mm colour transparency slides produced by Fine Arts Magazine, 1991. Private collection. Far Left: Wang Youshen, China/Avant-Garde exhibition. Before and after the ‘Shooting Incident’ (detail), 1989 – 2019, inkjet prints, dimensions variable, courtesy Wang Youshen. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu, Dialogue (对话
), 1989, single channel video, 2:04 minutes, documentation of installation and performance: 11.10 am, 5 February 1989, China/Avant-Garde exhibition National Art Gallery, Beijing. Reproduced courtesy Wen Pulin Archive of Chinese Avant-Garde Art and Xiao Lu. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Tables: China/Avant-Garde exhibition archival materials. Back: Wang Youshen, China/Avant-Garde exhibition. Before and after the ‘Shooting Incident’ (detail), 1989 – 2019, inkjet prints, dimensions variable, courtesy Wang Youshen. Bottom Right: China/Avant-Garde exhibition, set of 210 archival 35mm colour transparency slides produced by Fine Arts Magazine, 1991. Private collection. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. China/Avant-Garde exhibition archival materials. Image: Kai Wasikowski

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Left: Xiao Lu, Tides (絅蟙) (detail), documentation of performance, Sydney, 18 January 2019, installation: sand, bamboo poles. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist. Right: Xiao Lu, Sperm (精子), 2006, C-type print, 120 x 160cm, edition 6/10, printed 2016, documentation of performance: 21-23 May 2006, Long March Project – Yan’an, Kangda Hotel, Yan’an. Courtesy Long March Space and the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Xiao Lu, 15 Gunshots… From 1989 to 2003, (15枪…从1989 到 2003), 2003, 15 black and white digital prints, framed and then punctured by a bullet,
100 x 45 cm, printed 2018, edition 12/15,
photographs by Li Songsong. Courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Left: Xiao Lu, Polar (极地) (detail), 2016,
C-type prints, 80 x 120 cm, editions 1/9 and 5/9, printed 2018, documentation of performance: 23 October 2016, Beijing Live 1, Danish Cultural Center, 798 Arts District, Beijing, China. Photographs by Yi Zhilei. Courtesy the artist. Right: Xiao Lu,
Polar (极地),
2016,
single channel video, 4:43 minutes,
documentation of performance: 23 October 2016, Beijing Live 1, Danish Cultural Center, 798, Beijing, China. Filmed by Zhang Zhiqiang and Li Kai, edited by Zhang Li and Xiao Lu. Courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿 , detail installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Left: Xiao Lu, Tides (絅蟙) (detail), documentation of performance, Sydney, 18 January 2019, installation: sand, bamboo poles. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist. Centre: Xiao Lu,
One (合), 2015,
single channel video, 3:10 minutes,
documentation of performance: 5 September 2015, Live Action 10, Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Filmed by Zhang Zhiqiang, edited by Xiao Lu. Courtesy the artist. Right: Xiao Lu, One, (合一) (detail), 2015,
C-type print, 120 x 80 cm, edition 6/10, printed 2017, documentation of performance: 5 September 2015, Live Action 10, Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Photographs by Lin Qijian. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

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Xiao Lu, Tides (弄潮), 18 January 2019, Sydney, sand and, bamboo, inkjet print on silk. Photograph by Jacquie Manning. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

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Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA!

CHINESE GARDEN OF FRIENDSHIP, SYDNEY. 2 FEBRUARY – 17 FEBRUARY 2019.

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Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA! is an exhibition that creates a tangible connection between the Chinese-Australian communities of Sydney and provides a unique opportunity for visitors to engage with the history of the Garden through neo-traditional artworks depicting modern and historical Lunar New Year cultural imagery.

Presenting twelve new and existing bespoke tapestries by emerging Sydney artist Chris Yee, visitors to the Chinese Garden of Friendship during Lunar New Year 2019 go on a journey through the Gardens, discovering detailed, beautiful and humorous images at every turn. Yee’s design work evokes the experiences and narratives of the Chinese diasporic communities of the city expressed through a graphic sensibility that echoes that architectural forms and decorative embellishments of the Chinese Garden of Friendship. Hand woven, the tapestries in this special exhibition, presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, compliment the natural flow of the venue, synthesising a harmonious environment of traditional and contemporary artistic expression.

Chris Yee (b. 1989, Sydney) is an East Ryde (Sydney) based artist, illustrator and designer who specialises in traditional “pen and paper” methodologies. Chris’ main influences stem and vary from 90’s post-apocalyptic manga, rap and punk aesthet- ics. Through his imagery he constructs narratives ranging from the humorous to the monstrous and macabre. Chris’ solo exhibitions include Mad Love, 2015, Japan Foundation, Sydney; Panorama, 2015, Kind Of- Gallery, Sydney; and has par- ticipated in group and collaborative exhibitions including No Más (with Andrew Yee), 2018, Wedge Gallery, Sydney; SOFT, 2016, Superchief Gallery, Los Angeles; and Goliath Ballroom (with James Jirat Patradoon), 2015, Goodspace, Sydney. Out- side his art practice, Chris is a designer who has produced work for some of Australia’s best-known brands, including VIVID Festival Sydney, Sony Australia, Samsung – Opera House, Vans, Red Bull and Gelato Messina.

Chris Yee: HI MEDUSA! has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.

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Documentation:

All images by Chris Yee.

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L-R: Chris Yee, TEAM, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship; 4 CORNERS, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, MIRRORBALL, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 175 x 160cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, SYDNEY WORLD TOUR, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, UNITED NATIONS, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, EYES (CLASSIC), 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 152.4 x 63.5cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, BOSS BABY, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, MAINLAND, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 152.4 x 127cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, STOCK XCHANGE, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, BOY MEETS WORLD, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 152.4 x 127cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, PEACE PLACE, 2017, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.
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Chris Yee, TWINS EFFECT, 2019, 100% American made, woven cotton yarn, 127 x 152.4cm, installation view, Chinese Garden of Friendship. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, Australia and produced for The Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour for Lunar New Year 2019.

Choi Jeong-Hwa: Love Me, Pig

DARLING HARBOUR PRECINCT, SYDNEY. 2 FEBRUARY – 18 FEBRUARY 2019.

To celebrate Lunar New Year 2019 in the Darling Harbour precinct, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) is creating a special installation to mark the festival. Leading international artist Choi Jeong-Hwa has collaborated with 4A to present a continuation of his Happy Happy Project with his world-renowned inflatable flying pink pig Love Me, Pig visiting Sydney for the first time. Two editions of Love Me, Pig have been adapted for display as part of the Lunar New Year Festival in Sydney and will be the centre point of celebrations in Darling Harbour, with one positioned outside the Chinese Garden of Friendship, and one outside the ICC.

Choi Jeong-Hwa has always been inspired by everyday objects where he builds oversized sculptures from moulded plastics and inflatables. His work is characterised by its ability to speak to audiences with Mr Choi seeking to make art not for museums or galleries but for everyone. In Sydney new editions of Love Me, Pig have been created to celebrate the Lunar New Year of the Pig and playfully celebrates the pig as an East Asian symbol for wealth, fortune and luck.

On the first weekend of the festival from Saturday 2 February, watch the pigs come to life for their first inflation and see live water painting from calligraphy expert, Master Dongyang, as he creates an engaging public performance, painting wishes for Sydney in the coming year – a special moment that will activate these spaces. Audiences will be invited to water paint their own wishes for the new year on the grounds around Love Me, Pig.

After the painting event to coincide with the opening of the Lunar New Year festival, Love Me, Pig will remain on display until February 18, throughout the New Year celebrations.

Choi Jeong-Hwa (b. 1961 Seoul, South Korea) is an artist and designer whose work moves between the disciplines of visual art, graphic design, industrial design and architecture. Inspired by the harmony and chaos of the urban environment, Choi undermines the hierarchy of the museum by installing his pieces on the outside of buildings.

His playful practice comments on the privileged environment of art institutions and questions the prized status of artworks amidst a consumer-frenzied world. He is well known for large scale surreal installations from found objects. He constructed a 10-storey building installation made from 1,000 discarded doors, and decorated Seoul’s Olympic Stadium with garlands made from 2 million pieces of trash, transforming the building’s surface into glittering, jeweled structure. In his other pieces, he explores ideas of artificiality and permanence through the use of plastic, food, and flowers.

Choi participated in many Art festivals and exhibitions. He was the Korean representative in “Secret Beyond the Door”(2005), at Venice Biennale, Italy. Most recently he participated in the Bangkok Art Biennale (2018), The Asia Pacific Triennial (2015) at QAGOMA and has held a solo exhibition Choi Jeong Hwa: Happy Together (2016) at the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki. He declines to categorize his work, leaving the audience to define his pieces at a personal level, as his motto states: “My art is your heart”.

JIA (FAMILY, HOUSE, HOME)

19 September – 18 October 2003

 

Artists: Lindy Lee, Greg Leong, William Yang

Jia (Family, House, Home) is a group exhibition presented with the Carnivale Multicultural Arts Festival. To be opened by Mr King Fong OAM.

The exhibition toured internationally with an opening held at the Hong Kong Fringe Club on 4 February 2004. Included speeches by Douglas Gautier (Executive Director, HK Arts Festival), the officiating guests John Phibeam, Deputy Consul-General of Australian Consulate General Hong Kong, and Benny Chia, Director of Fringe Club, and participating artists Lindy Lee and William Yang respectively. A video of the opening can be found on Asian Art Archive.

OPEN LETTER

10 March – 14 May 2005

Phase Two Exhibition Launch

Thursday 14 April 6.00-8.00PM

Artists: Dadang Christanto, Emil Goh, George Poonkhin Khut + John Tonkin, Selina Ou, Vienna Parreno + Krysztof Osinski, Melissa Ramos, Koky Saly, Phaptawan Suwannakudt, My Le Thi, Suzann Victor

Open Letter is a touring exhibition celebrating the 30th anniversary of Australia’s dialogue partnership with ASEAN.

 

 

PROCESS

October – 20 November 2004

Exhibition Launch

Thursday 21 October 6.00-9.00PM

Artists: Emil Goh, Guan Wei, My Le Thi

Process is a group exhibition presenting the works of Emil Goh, Guan Wei and My Le Thi. To be opened by Councillor Phillip Black, City of Sydney at the Asia-Australia Arts Centre.

Artist Talks

Friday 22 October 2.00PM

Workshop 

Saturday 23 October 2pm

The artists Guan Wei  and My Le Thi will be conducting workshops and public interactive projects during this exhibition.

 

 

 

MY CHINATOWN: SITES OF SIGNIFICANCE

8 February – 9 March 2002.

My Chinatown: Sites of Significance is an exhibition that explores the experience of the Chinese in Australia from a historical and contemporary perspective. Photographs, objects and memorabilia from private family collections, which date from the 1880s to the present day record sites such as suburban Chinese restaurants and cafes, temples, market gardens and trade stores. Sites of Significance also features the work of five contemporary artists: Tom Dion, Lindy Lee, Laurens Tan, Paula Wong and William Yang, whose art practices explore different aspects and levels of identification with their Chinese-Australian identity. Sites of Significance brings together contemporary art and historical material to illustrate an important interface between cultural history and contemporary innovation, highlighting a dynamic living history of Chinese communities in Australia.

My Chinatown: Sites of Significance is sponsored by the City of Sydney Chinese New Year Festival.

Artists’ Christmas Car Boot Sale

SYDNEY. 6 DEC 2018, 5.00 – 9.00PM

The Artists’ Christmas Car Boot Sale is curated by Sydney-based artist Garry Trinh. Descend to the lower levels of World Square to encounter established and emerging artists. Step into cars transformed into mini galleries and fossick in boots for one-off original art just in time for Christmas. Think driver-seat seances, artworks delivered straight from the studio and intimate car boot performances.

Featuring DJ Coris, refreshments and a pop-up Gift Wrapping service with all proceeds being donated to Wesley Mission to tackle homelessness in Sydney, this will be a Christmas Market like no other!

Featured cartist boots include:

The Car Boot Sale will take place on Thursday 6 December, 2018 on Level 5 of World Square Shopping Centre (644 George St, Sydney NSW 2000).


 

garry-trihn

Garry Trinh (born Sydney,  Australia and lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is an artist working in photography, video, painting and works on paper. He holds a BA in Psychology and a BA in Visual Communications / Photography and Digital Imaging from the University of Western Sydney.

Trinh was the winner of the Sydney Life photography prize in 2007 and won the Auburn Mayoral Photographic Prize in 2009 and 2010. His photo book Just Heaps Surprised to be Alive was nominated for Photography Book of the Year at the 4th International Photo book Festival at Kassel, Germany. From 2017-2018 Trinh was a full time tenant at Parramatta Artists Studios. His work is collected by the Art Gallery of NSW and Artbank. He has been exhibited at the Australian Centre for Photography, Campbelltown Arts Centre, Blacktown Arts Centre, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, Stills Gallery, Gallery 4A and many others.

Trinh makes art about the uncanny, unexpected and spontaneous moments in daily life and to express his personal ideas. He is perplexed by the perception of artists as coffee-drinking loafers who work whenever they feel like it. He doesn’t even drink coffee. His works are about a way of looking at the world, to reveal magic in the mundane. He is never bored and never late.

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Chapter One: Thinking through it

PEACOCK GALLERY, AUBURN. 15 September – 21 October 2018.

Opening: Saturday 15 September 2018, 1:30 – 3:30pm.

As part of the 2018 Curators’ Intensive presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art two emerging curators have been selected to curate an exhibition at Peacock Gallery.

Chapter One: Thinking through it is a project curated by Sabrina Baker that exists as a reading room, research space and open studio. Artists have contributed things that influence their working methods and you’re invited to dive into their practice through the stacks of books taken from bedside tables and studio desks, the photographs, knick knacks and stuff that feeds into the development of their work.

Hannah Donnelly, Thea Jones, Shivanjani Lal, Nikki Lam, Anja Loughhead, Stephen Pham, and Jason Phu work with different materials and methods to craft works that explore place in relation to the self.

Each of the artists explore themes of personal identity and myth making with a grounding in being both inside and outside of their local environments – where they are now and where they have been before.

Tongues (curated by Isabel Rouch) // Peacock Gallery – 4A Curators’ Intensive Exhibition 1

PEACOCK GALLERY, AUBURN. 15 September – 21 October 2018.

Opening: Saturday 15 September 2018, 1:30 – 3:30pm.

As part of the 2018 Curators’ Intensive presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art two emerging curators have been selected to curate an exhibition at Peacock Gallery.

Tongues (curated by Isabel Rouch) is the first offering in an ongoing curatorial project, exploring the varied effects language can have on us as individuals.

The exhibition questions how our experience of the world and self changes with language, and what can be lost or gained through translation.

Tongues brings together the personal perspectives of multidisciplinary, Sydney based artists, Yeliz Yorulmaz, Kai Wasikowski and Eugene Choi; each sharing the experience of being multilingual or growing up in a multilingual context.

All three respond to the theme of identity through language, reflecting particularly on how their exposure to linguistic diversity has influenced them, and in addition, how their art practice fits into this layered understanding and correspondence.

Belinda Lai and Alice Wesley-Smith: To Have and To Hold

Wednesday 24 May, 2006

Fashion and art collide in a one-night only collaboration between designer Belinda Lai and photographer Alice Wesley-Smith, to be held at the Asia Australia Arts Centre (Gallery 4A).

The unique fashion pieces on display are originally sourced from clothing from the 1900s through to the 1970s:

“The concept is to reinstate the gentle tradition of keeping clothing as heirlooms, similar to other forms of jewellery and adornment. Clothes are no longer just ‘rags of the ragtrade,’ but keepsakes that can be treasured from generation to generation.” – Belinda Lai

The photography draws upon the extensive experiences of Wesley-Smith throughout Europe and, in particular, Asia where she constantly draws inspiration. The interaction of these displaced communities within the social context of Australia is of particular interest in her photographic work.


Belinda Lai was the winner of the Mercedes-Benz Startup Young Fashion Designer of 2004.

Alice Wesley-Smith is currently working on a solo exhibition of  her recent experiences in East Timor.

Chris Doyle: The Space of a Kiss

2 – 24 August, 2002

Chris Doyle: The Space of a Kiss is an official event of Sydney Asia Pacific Film Festival and presents a series of photo-collages at Gallery 4a [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art].


Christopher Doyle (b. 1952) is an Australian-Hong Kong cinematographer who has worked on high profile films such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and extensively in Hong Kong with director Wong KariWai on Chungking ExpressFallen Angels and In The Mood for Love. He has won awards at Cannes Film Festival, Venice Film Festival, an AFI Award for cinematography, four Golden Horse awards and six Hong Kong Film Awards.

15th Biennale of Sydney: Zones of Contact

8 June – 27 August 2006

Exhibiting artists at Gallery 4A at the Asia-Australia Arts Centre [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art]: Stella Brennan (NZL), Chen Chieh-jen (TWN) and Kai Syng Tan (SGP)

Expansive in both curatorial ambition and footprint, Zones of Contact expanded beyond its principal, inner-city venues to other sites, including art centres in south-west Sydney suburbs of Blacktown and Campbelltown, in a desire to reach broader audiences. The scale of the undertaking was equalled by Merewether’s inclusive research process, which included visits to many countries in the two years prior to the 2006 Biennale.

Thematically, the exhibition dealt broadly with events, ideas and concerns that shape our lives, as well as our sense of past and future. It explored zones in which people live and move: cities and settlements, the merging and separation of public areas and private territories, and places where people encounter one another. In an attempt to map the world through its artists, Merewether gathered work about landscape and territory, notions of home and homeland, and the impact of cross-cultural encounter.

Sub-themes of colonialism, experiences of war and conflict, displacement, migration and mobility in the exhibition played out against experiences of living in an increasingly cosmopolitan, globalised world.


Stella Brennan (b. 1974, Auckland, New Zealand) is an Auckland-based artist, writer and curator. She has a Masters degree in Fine Arts from Auckland University. In 2003 she was the Waikato University’s inaugural Digital Artist in Residence. She is also the founder of Aotearoa Digital Arts, New Zealand’s only discussion list dedicated to New Media Art.

Chen Chieh-Jen (b. 1960, Taoyuan, Taiwan) is a Taipei-based artist and filmmaker.

Tan Kai Syng (b. 1975, Singapore) is a performance and installation artist. Her video recordings of folk recalling events highlight the difference in histories, suggesting a questioning of historical truth. Challenging hegemonic narrative structures in oral histories, Syng attempts to reconstruct history through collective subjective memory.

Paula Wong: Take

23 November – 15 December, 2001

Take is a collection of new video works by Paula Wong produced during her recent studies at Goldsmiths College, on a Samstag Scholarship. The ambiguous imagery in these silent video pieces destabilise the viewer by challenging their sense of the familiar, questioning the processes of vision and cognition.

Paula Wong is a based in Melbourne. She was included in the Moet & Chandon travelling exhibition in 1999 and has exhibited widely throughout Australia, at RMIT University Galleries; the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the National Gallery of Australia.

Aaron Seeto: The one thousand other things

23 November – 15 December, 2001

The one thousand other things is an exhibition by Aaron Seeto, which explores the blurring of plots from B-grade Kung Fu films and stories retold through the family photo album. Using food, specifically 1000-year-old eggs and salt preserved duck eggs, relished Chinese delicacies; Seeto creates photographs using and old salt photographic process. On these eggs, texts from Kung Fu films are interspersed with pictures of distant relatives, plotlines of murder, intrigue and honour, popular Hong Kong cinema and Australian urban domestic environments converge.

Aaron Seeto is an emerging Sydney-based artist. He has been included in exhibitions at Wollongong City Gallery; Casula Powerhouse; Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and he is a participant in the Weather Report Project in The Hague, The Netherlands.

Xiao Xian Liu: From My Other Lives to the Present

21 September – 20 October, 2001

Xiao Xian Liu’s exhibition examines history and race in the context of his Chinese background. Games and The Way We Eat are new works that draw on the difference between what is native and what is introduced to Australia. Playing on famous Australian icons, the artist creates a humourous view of of our sense of identity. In My Other Lives traditional stereographs are incorporated with the artist’s face. This process alters the identity in the picture and contrasts the European with the Asian face.

Xiao Xian Liu is a Chinese artist based in Sydney. He has shown at the National Gallery of Australia and The Moet & Chandon Exhibition Passing Time at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

Michael Bullock: Rubber Fish (Con Cá Cao Su)

21 September – 20 October, 2001

Rubber Fish (Con Cá Con Su) is an exhibition by Michael Bullock which was made during an artist residency in Hanoi, Vietnam. It features a school of fish made from recycled car, bicycle and truck inner tubes, inflated and suspended in mid-air. The work was inspired by the contrast of social conditions in Vietnam. The fish is also a potent symbol in Vietnamese culture, portraying luck and fertility.

Dong Wang Fan: Descendants

20 April – 19 May, 2001

Descendants is an exhibition by Dong Wang Fan that examines cultural identity and spatial ambiguity. The five paintings in Descendants feature computer-generated objects to represent a kind of futuristic creature with mechanical parts.

Dong Wang Fan is a Chinese-born artist currently living in Sydney. He has held many exhibitions since migrating to Australia including at the Drill Hall Gallery; Australian National University; Wollongong City Gallery; Hazelhurst Regional Gallery; Campbelltown City Art Gallery and Ray Hughes Gallery, Sydney.

Nelia Justo: My Pleasure is Your Tea

21 April – 19 May, 2001

My Pleasure is Your Tea is a series of works by Nelia Justo which explores the relationship between Eastern and Western cultures through an examination of historical trade ties between Europe and Asia in the 15th – 19th Centuries. By incorporating aspects of refined goods with mass produced electronic parts, Justo explores the cultural, sociological and economical repercussions created in trade between two cultural identities.

Nelia Justo is a French-born emerging artist based in Sydney. She has shown at numerous galleries throughout Australia, including the 13th Tamworth Fibre Textile Biennial; Jam Factory, Adelaide; the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane as well as overseas.

Tim Silver: Untitled (viole(n)t crumble)

22 June – 14 July, 2001

untitled (viole(n)t crumble) is an exhibition of new work by Tim Silver of chocolate moulded Action Man figures. Using the stickiness of sugar as a raw material of commodification, Silver examines the relationship between art and commerce.

Tim Silver is an emerging Sydney-based artist who has exhibited in artist-run spaces in Sydney and Melbourne.

Greg Leong: Singing History Quilts For New Chinese Australians

22 June – 14 July, 2001

Singing History Quilts For New Chinese Australians is an exhibition by Greg Leong which explores the celebrations of the Centenary of Federation through textiles and karaoke. In this series, richly decorated quilts sing Australiana classics that have been translated into Cantonese. These intricately designed quilts combine iconic Australian paintings with references to traditional Chinese textiles to explore an alternative perspective on the recent celebrations.

Greg Leong is a Tasmania-based artist who has exhibited at Tamworth Regional Gallery, Object Gallery, as well as internationally In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Dani Marti: You Make Me Feel Like Love, Peace and Happiness

15 March – 14 April, 2001

You Make Me Feel Like Love, Peace and Happiness is an exhibition of new works by Dani Marti.

Linda is a teaser and a seducer. Linda is the personification of Marti’s work of highly textural weave. Representing psycho-sexual tension, strands criss-cross to reveal sensual curves that are at the same time stretched taut along the plane. Like magnified swatches of fabric, the works act as conjuring devices, giving the viewer leave to create their own Linda provided it is within the bounds which dictates her persona.

 

linda 216 A4 digital prints, pins on board approx. 350 x 250 x 60 cm. Image supplied by artist.
linda 216 A4 digital prints, pins on board approx. 350 x 250 x 60 cm. Image supplied by artist.

Dani Marti is a Sydney-based artist. He has had exhibitions at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Artspace, Gitte Weiss Gallery and Gallery 19.

Kate Beynon: Li Ji: Warrior Girl

15 March – 14 April, 2001

Li Ji: Warrior Girl is an animated video and audio installation by Kate Beynon. Li Ji is the modern reincarnation of an ancient Chinese heroine by the same name. As she wanders through Melbourne at night, she encounters new hostilities. But unlike the treat of the maiden-eating python of her past life, Li Ji battles with the issue of being accepted as Australian. Li Ji: Warrior Girl is an exploration into the complex issues of race, identity, migration and belonging.

Eugenia Raskopoulos: Untitled 00

27 September – 21 October 2000

In the experimental spirit of the Picasso flashlight drawings, Eugenia Raskopoulos has created an elegant photographic exhibition that plays with the veracity of the black and white image. Untitled 00 is an extension of work exhibited earlier this year at the Australian Centre for Photography where the artist, light source in hand, documented the making of minimal and extravagant gestures in front of the camera.

Sue Pedley: Midday – Sound to Drawing, Drawing to Sound

2 – 26 August 2000

Sue Pedley’s installation at Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] has been inspired by her participation in the Second Vietnamese Sculptural Symposium held in Hue in 1998. Using sounds that she has recorded from her local environment, her prints and installation expand upon ideas of visual and audio pattern and rhythm, representing vibrations of sound and silence with colour and line.

Persuasion

16 February – 18 March, 2000

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Michael Shaowanasai and Toby Huynh

Thai male prostitutes and the rituals of Chinese marriage feature in this exhibition by Thai-American Michael Shoawanasai and Vietnamese-Australian Toby Huynh.

Michael Shaowanasai focuses on sex for sale. His works at alternative galleries and public sites in Bangkok explore the male sex worker in one of the most infamous destinations for sex tourism within our region. Shaowanasai’s installation and performances for the Festival critically evaluate the sex industry in Thailand by recreating a Go-Go bar, complete with instructional video.

Toby Huynh’s digital images explore the rituals associated with Chinese marriages. Huynh’s work proposes and alternative set of rituals that Buddhist same-sex couples could perform. Would couples, for instance, kneel down in front of their ancestors and offer them tea? These images subtly evoke the tension between traditional cultural and religious values and contemporary gay and lesbian life.

Persuasion is a visual art event for the 2000 Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival.

Li Shan: Skin Secrets

11 February – 6 March 1999

Li Shan is one of China’s most exciting artists. His sensuous paintings explore male sexuality through metaphor. The massive paintings of the Rouge series, for instance, feature photo-realistic black and white images of male nudes sprouting magenta and white lotus flowers.

These powerful works comment on issues related to aesthetics within China. Flower painting is a well respected Chinese tradition but in La Shan’s paintings flowers come to represent vitality and sexuality.

Skin Secrets is a visual arts event for the 1999 Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival.

Culture Graft

24 September – 10 October 1998

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Ah Xian (b. 1960, Beijing, China), Wang Zhiyuan (b. 1958, Tianjin, China) and Guan Wei (b. 1957, Beijing, China)

Culture Graft is the title of an exhibition featuring the work of three Chinese-Australian artists: Ah Xian, Wang Zhiyuan and Guan Wei. The title of this exhibition is intended to suggest the difficult and sometimes contradictory processes of acculturation – on aspect of the experience of migration – by using botanical technique of grafting as a metaphor. The definition of graft describes the coming together of two separate strands, while meld and grow together to become one. In the context of this exhibition this metaphor highlights a tension between different cultures (Chinese and Australian) making a clear distinction between the past and present.

wang_zhiyuan_the_old_fable_98_the_new_century_children_story_ink_on_paper

Wang Zhiyuan, The Old Fable, 1998, ink on paper. Courtesy the artist.
Header image: Ah Xian, Fading Book Series – Mother Theresa (detail), 1998, toner on cloth bound book. Courtesy the artist.

Truong Tan: AIDS HeART

12 – 28 February 1998

Curator: Melissia Chiu
Artist: Truong Tan (b. Hanoi)

Truong Tan’s arresting lacquer panels and works on rice paper principally deal with gay issues in Vietnam. He poses questions related to the demonisation of gay people in government propaganda as well as the lack of serious health measures against the spread of AIDS. In effect, he questions moral and social attitudes in Vietnam towards gay men and women.

Linda Sang: Chinoiserie

4 – 27 September 1997

Chinoiserie was Linda Sang’s new exhibition at Gallery 4A. Utilising food from Chinese cooking as a material for art, Sang prepared a visual delight.

Linda Sang created a tableau which mimics a traditional Chinese household. Latticework window screens, red plush carpet and claw feet table provided a setting for the unexpected.

 

Header Image: Chinoiserie, 1997, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. From clockwise left to right: Linda Sang, Moss Table, 1997, painted wood, moss. Linda Sang, Tripe Butterfly Chair, 1995, latex, steel. Linda Sang, Jack Fruit Footstool, 1997, wood, latex. Linda Sang, “Miss Sang” after “Miss Wong”, Tretchlkoff, 1997, oil on canvas, wood, painted by Jude Walker. Linda Sang, Chinese Cabbage Standing Lamp, 1997, latex, steel, perspex. Linda Sang, Bitter Melon Butterfly Chair, 1997, latex, steel. With thanks to Jude Walker and Gail Daley. All images courtesy the artist. 

Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu

 SYDNEY.  27 OCTOBER  – 10 DECEMBER 2017.

Artists:
Sir Joseph Banks
Daniel Boyd
Newell Harry
Fiona Pardington
Michael Parekowhai
James Tylor

Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu examines how artists disturb the past by reframing and reworking the mythologies of nationhood. Focusing on the legacies of British imperialism in the South Pacific, the works presented in this exhibition offer a counterpoint to historical narratives that have emerged within colonial modes of scientific categorisation.

The voyage of the HMS Endeavour from 1768–1771, led by the then little known Lieutenant James Cook with botanist Joseph Banks, collected a staggering quantity of plant life from across the Asia Pacific – approximately 30,000 specimens from Australia and New Zealand alone, representing over 3,000 species, of which 1,400 were wholly new to science.[1]

The scale of this taxonomy, the science of naming and defining plant and animal life was, for these pioneers, without precedent and in many cases they created unstable, even flawed, systems of vocabulary, hierarchies and methods to describe this ‘new world’. [2]

Many of these instances outlast them to this day, for example, Cook named the ‘Kangaroo’ phonetically after ‘gangurru’, the term used by Aboriginal people on the North-East coast for local, large, grey marsupials. [3] Had Cook realised the plurality of Aboriginal language and that this word was foreign to most Indigenous people in Australia, the outcome could have been very different.[4] Nevertheless, examples like this set the template for generations of legends and myths.

The Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu draws upon these conflicting (and occasionally confounding) myths. By investigating and subverting colonial prejudices inherent in the formulation of language and conceptions of nature, the artists provide new frameworks and connections, enabling us to recognise the world anew.

A selection of archival and recent works from artists Sir Joseph Banks (United Kingdom), Daniel Boyd (Australia), Newell Harry (Australia), Fiona Pardington (New Zealand), Michael Parekowhai (New Zealand) and James Tylor (Australia) is brought together for this exhibition – inclusive of a series of Banks’ copperplate etchings of Australian botanical illustration rarely seen in a contemporary exhibition context. This exhibition continues 4A’s series of exhibition projects that examine the shared histories and ties between Australia and our Asia-Pacific neighbours.

 

About the artists:

Sir Joseph Banks

b. 1743, London, England d. 1820, London, England

Sir Joseph Banks, 1st Baronet, GBC, PRS was a highly decorated British naturalist and botanist that made a number of significant contributions towards the natural sciences. Following his election as President of the Royal Society, he and collaborators boarded the HMS Endeavour, James Cook’s first great voyage of Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia and the Pacifc. During this trip, he and his team collected over 30 000 specimens from Australia and New Zealand alone, representing 3 000 species, of which 1400 were wholly new to science. Illustrator Sydney Parkinson documented these specimens. Through this momentous trip, he would become a de-facto ambassador for Australia as a destination for botanic research during England’s colonial project. Upon his return to England, Banks and lifelong collaborator, Daniel Solander oversaw an encyclopedic engravings of plant life using the illustrations by Sydney Parkinson. These were printed in black ink, and then in colour ink almost 200 years after Bank’s death.

Daniel Boyd

Kudjila/Gangalu b. 1982, Cairns, Australia lives and works in Sydney, Australia

Daniel Boyd is internationally recognised for his contemporary history paintings that interrogate Eurocentric perspectives of Australian colonial history. His technique borrows from Central Australian Aboriginal dot paintings and Impressionist pointillism, imbuing colonial scenes and ancestral figures with an affecting sense of intrigue, memorialisation and loss. His recent exhibitions include: Bitter Sweet, Cairns Art Gallery, Cairns, Australia (2017); All the World’s Futures, 56th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2015); Moscow International Biennale for Young Arts: A Time for Dreams, Moscow, Russia (2014); Bungaree: The First Australian, Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery, Lake Macquarie, Australia (2013); The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2012); One Caption Hides Another, Bétonsalon, Paris, France (2011); We Call Them Pirates Out Here, MCA, Sydney, Australia (2010); Contemporary Australia: Optimism, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2008); and Culture Warriors: National Indigenous Art Triennial, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia (2007). Boyd’s work are held in the collections of the Natural History Museum, London, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, Australia; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia and Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Newell Harry

b. 1972, Sydney, Australia lives and works in Sydney, Australia

Newell Harry’s practice encompasses a wide range of processes, media and installations that feature cultural references drawn from his travels – from Australia’s eastern seaboard, to the Vanauato archipelago, India, north-east Asia and his ancestral home of Capetown, South Africa. His works consider the legacies of the colonial project on native language, culture, politics and economies throughout these regions. His recent exhibitions include: Tidalectics, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art 21, Autgarten, Vienna, Austria (2017); Sonnant et trebuchant, Les Abattoirs, Musee FRAC Occitan, Toulouse, France (2017); Grounded, National Art School Gallery, Sydney, Australia (2017); Sugar Spin: You, Me, Art and Everything Else, Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2016); Tarrawarra Biennial of Australian Art, Tarrawarra Museum of Art, TarraWarra, Australia (2016); All the World’s Futures56th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2015) and (Untitled) 12th Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul, Turkey (2012). Harry’s works are held in the collections of Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia; Newcastle Art Gallery, Sydney, Australia; Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia and Monash University Art Collection, Melbourne, Australia.

Fiona Pardington

b. 1961, Auckland, New Zealand lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand

Fiona Pardington photographic practice delves deep into the world of public and private collections. Using the still life format Pardington has photographed museum objects, particularly ‘taonga’, objects sacred to Maori culture. She often presents these treasures alongside a tableau of native flora and fauna, and found objects – creating unique portraits of historical and contemporary Maori, New Zealand and pacific culture. Her recent exhibitions include: A Beautiful Hesitation, City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand; Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki, Auckland, New Zealand; Christchurch Art Gallery,Christchurch New Zealand (2015-16); In My Dreaming I Saw – Moea Iho Nei I Au, Suite, Wellington, New Zealand, (2015); lux et tenebris Momentum Worldwide, Berlin, Germany (2014); Supernatural, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, Australia (2014) and The Pressure of Sunlight Falling, Govett-Brewster Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand (2011). Pardington’s works are held in the collections of Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, France; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada; National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C, USA; Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia; Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, New Zealand; Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand and Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney, Australia.

Michael Parekowhai

b. 1968, Wellington, New Zealand lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand

Michael Parekowhai carefully dissects Maori identity politics, culture and history through his layered art making that warps references and allusions to art history, personal memories, grand-narratives of nationhood and popular culture. Through lustrous photographs, sculpture and installation, he reinvents these imagery and material, creating quirky parables that invite open interpretation and intrigue. His recent exhibitions include: The English Channel, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2017); Soft Core, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, Sydney, Australia (2016); Michael Parekowhai: The Promised Land, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2015); Menagerie, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), Melbourne, Australia (2014); On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer, Christchurch Art Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand (2013); Peripheral Relations; Marcel Duchamp and New Zealand Art 1960-2011, Adam Art Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand (2012) and On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer, Palazzo Loredan Dell’Ambasciatore, Dorsoduro, Venice (representing New Zealand), 54th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2011). Parekowhai’s work is held in the collections of Musee Du Quai Branly, Paris, France; Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand; Te Papa Tongarewa, Museum of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia and Arario Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea.

James Tylor

Nunga (Kaurna) and Maori (Te Arawa). b. 1986 Mildura, Australia lives and works in Adelaide, Australia

James Tylor examines cultural identity in Australian contemporary culture. Using the lens of his multi-cultural heritage, which comprises Nunga (Kaurna), Māori (Te Arawa) and European (English, Scottish, Irish, Dutch, Iberian and Norwegian) Australian ancestry, he experiments with range of historical and experimental photographic processes, to examine 19th century Australian history and its legacy on identity in Australia. His recent exhibitions include: Resolution: New Indigenous Photomedia, Shepparton Art Museum, Shepparton, Australia (2017); The witching hour, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, Australia (2017); Ramsay Art Prize Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia (2017, finalist); New Matter: Recent forms of Photographs, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (2016); Endless Circulation: TarraWarra Biennial, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Healesville, Australia (2016) and Territorial Encounters, Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia (2016). Tylor’s works are held in the collections of Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.


[1] P. J. Hatfield., The Material History of the Endeavour in Chambers, N. (ed.), Endeavouring Banks (London: Paul Holberton Publishing, 2016).

[2] M. Hetherington and H. Morphy, Footprints in the Sand: Banks’s Maori collection, Cook’s first voyage 1768-71 (Canberra: National Museum of Australia, 2009).

[3] R. Cilento, 1971, Sir Joseph Banks, F.R.S., and the Naming of the Kangaroo, Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, 26, pp. 157 -161 and H. Parsons, British-Tahitian collaborative drawing strategies on Cook’s Endeavour voyage in Shino Konishi, Maria Nugent and Tiffany Shellam (ed.), Indigenous Intermediaries: new perspectives on exploration archives (Canberra: Australia National University Press, 2015).

[4] Ibid.

 

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

 

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Foreground: Michael Parekowhai, The Moment of Cubism & Nude Descending a Staircase 2009, hand-finished bronze, patina.
Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney. 
Background: Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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L – R: Michael Parekowhai (from the series ‘Beverly Hills Gun Club’), Alex Hamilton, Dave Douglas, J.D. Jones, 2004, 
s
parrow, two pot paint, aluminium, 78 x 13 x 10 cm eachCourtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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Foreground: Daniel Boyd, Decomissioned skull boxes, Natural History Museum, London, 2013.
Background: Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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L – R: Fiona Pardington, Still Life with Freud and Puriri, 2012, pigment inks on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag, 82.5 x 110 cm. Fiona Pardington,
Captive Female Huia, 2017, pigment inks on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag, 110 x 146 cm. With thanks Te Manawa Museum, New Zealand.
Courtesy the artist and Starkwhite, Auckland.

 

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L – R: Daniel Boyd, King No Beard, 2008, oil on linen, 167 x 122 cm. Collection, Clinton Ng. Daniel Boyd, Sir No Beard, 2009, oil
on canvas, 153 x 137.5 cm. Courtesy the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney and STATION, Melbourne.

 

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L – R: Sir Joseph Banks, Florilegium: Plate 63 (edition 100/100), 1980 – 1990, copperplate engraving. Sir Joseph Banks, Florilegium:
Plate 57
(edition 100/100). 1980 – 1990, copperplate engraving. Courtesy Angela Tandori Fine Art, Melbourne. James Tylor, Terra
Botanica I (Eucalyptus gracilis), Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon)
Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon II), Terra
Botanica I (Grevillea banksii), Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), Terra Botanica II (Agathis-australis), Terra Botanica
II (Banksia ericifolia), Terra Botanica II (Ipomoea batatas I, Kūmara), Terra Botanica II (Metrosideros-excelsa, Pohutukawa)
,
2015, becquerel daguerreotype, various dimensions. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne.

 

 

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L – R: James Tylor, Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), 2015, becquerel daguerreotype, 28 x 23 cm. James Tylor, Terra
Botanica II (Agathis-australis)
, 2015, becquerel daguerreotype, 14 x 11 cm. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne. 

 

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Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: WHITE WHINE, 2010, neon. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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L – R: Michael Parekowhai (from the series ‘Beverly Hills Gun Club’), John Taffin, Alex Hamilton, Dave Douglas, J.D. Jones, 2004, 
s
parrow, two pot paint, aluminium, 78 x 13 x 10 cm eachCourtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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James Tylor, Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus gracilis), Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon)Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon II),
Terra Botanica I (Grevillea banksii), Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), Terra Botanica II (Agathis-australis), Terra Botanica
II (Banksia ericifolia), Terra Botanica II (Ipomoea batatas I, Kūmara), Terra Botanica II (Metrosideros-excelsa, Pohutukawa)
, 2015,

becquerel daguerreotype, various dimensions. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne.

 

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Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: WHITE WHINE, 2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5 cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: LEVEL ROTOR,
2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5 cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: AVID DIVA, 2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s
in the Round: MALAYALAM RACECAR,
2010, neon, 135 x 175 x 5 cm.

I don’t want to be there when it happens

PERTH. 11 NOVEMBER – 24 DECEMBER

Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts

Raqs Media Collective
Reena Saini Kallat
Raj Kumar
Sonia Leber & David Chesworth
Mithu Sen
Adeela Suleman
Abdullah M I Syed

Starting from the fragile and complex socio-political relationship between India and Pakistan in the era of contemporary warfare, I don’t want to be there when it happens investigates, in a broader sense, the psychology of trauma.

The artists invited to participate in this exhibition reference unpleasant situations; from their own everyday experience of the contradictions and problems they face in their personal universe to the alarming signals of the profound existential unease of our age.

I don’t want to be there when it happens explores the relationship between art practice and trauma, loss and grief. It is an examination of what art can contribute in the aftermath of such experiences, of how it can produce meaning and discourse through the act of engagement.

The exhibition is organised as partnership between the Perth Institute for Contemporary Arts(PICA) and 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art and expanded on the occasion of its presentation at PICA. The original exhibition was held at 4A between August and October.

Adeela Suleman’s work to be shown in I don’t want to be there when it happens has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and The Keir Foundation.

Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area

SYDNEY. 20 JANUARY – 25 FEBRUARY 2018

Lee Kun-Yong with Australian artists Huseyin Sami, Daniel Von Sturmer and Emily Parsons-Lord.

Equal Area presents the work of Lee Kun-Yong, one of Korea’s most seminal conceptual artists, charting the development of his visual and theoretical methodology that has expanded possibilities for performance art since the 1970s. Lee is widely acclaimed for his innovative series of performances that examine the the connection between the logic of the mind and the gestures of the body. Throughout his career, Lee has investigated the connection between the human psyche and action through the act of performance and performance. His performances often test this relationship through the act of repetition, demonstrating how the construct of logic is subjective to its locale — slight shifts in each performance capture the body within present moments, leaving traces of an ‘event’.

In this unique presentation of photographic documentation of performances spanning his almost six-decade career, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art brings Lee Kun-Yong’s practice into dialogue with three contemporary Australian artists. Equal Area opens with a special performance of Snail’s Gallop, one of his most critically lauded works which he is staging in Australia for the first time. This is followed by a series of performances and live interventions by Australian artists, taking place in dialogue with the residue of Lee’s performances, that build on this examination of the repeated gesture and elucidate Lee’s influence on global contemporary performative practice.

 


 

Lee Kun-Yong (b. 1942, Sariwon, Korea; lives and works in Gunsan, Korea) is one of Korea’s most seminal conceptual artists, exploring the nexus between the human mind and its connection to the world. His experimental performative practice emerged in 1970s South Korea, a period where the country was marked by diminished civil rights and martial law, including civilian assembly controls and tightly scrutinised codes of social propriety. Through this period, Lee led numerous artistic responses to the political climate, creating subversive automated drawing experiments that made subtle yet identifiable comments on the authoritarian state. He continues his line of experimentation today, collaborating with new artists and bringing his messaging into the 21st century.

Lee Kun-Yong’s exhibition history includes: Experimental Art of Suwon in the 1980–1990s: It’s Not Quite That (2017), Suwon iPark Museum of Art, Suwon, Korea; As the Moon Waxes and Wanes (2016), National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Gwacheon, Korea (MMCA); Lee Kun-Yong in Snail’s Gallop (2014), MMCA; Korean Historical Conceptual Art 1970–80s: Jack-of-all-trades (2010), Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, Ansan, Korea; Lee Kun-Yong: Logic, Life, Commonplace (1998), Fine Arts Center of The Korean Culture and Arts Foundation, Seoul, Korea; A Groping for the Identity of Korean Contemporary Art II: The Art in the ‘Reduction’ and ‘Expansion’ Period (1991), Hanwon Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Korean Contemporary Art: The Trend of the 1970s (1974), Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei, Taiwan; 8th Biennale de Paris (1973), Paris, France; and 15th Bienal de São Paulo (1979), São Paulo, Brazil.

His works are held in numerous public and private collections, including the Jeonbuk Museum of Art, Wanju, Korea; Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea; National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea; Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea, and The Rachofsky Collection, Dallas, USA.

 

Emily Parsons-Lord (b. 1984, Bathurst, NSW; lives and works Sydney) is a cross-disciplinary contemporary artist whose art and practice is informed by research and critical dialogue with materials and climate science, through investigation into air and light, both materially, and culturally. Parsons-Lord’s work interrogates notions of the ‘natural’, the universe, and considers deep history and speculative futures, with works that engaged with the materiality of invisibility, magic, and the stories we tell about reality.

Select exhibitions include: NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging), Artspace, Sydney (2017); There is nothing accidental or surprising about this, Vitalstatistix for Climate Century, Port Adelaide (2017-2018); The Future Leaks Out, Liveworks Festival, Carriageworks, Sydney (2017); Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2016); Trod by Beasts Alone, Wellington St Projects, Sydney (2017); Bristol Biennial: In Other Worlds, Bristol, UK (2016); Our Fetid Rank (Margaret Thatcher’s bottom lip and Bill Clinton’s tongue),  Firstdraft, Sydney (2015);  Ever Fresh, STILLS gallery, Sydney (2015); Underbelly Arts 2015, Cockatoo Island,  Sydney (2015); busied and bruised with looking, Perth Centre for Photography, Perth (2015).

Parsons-Lord has been a finalist in the NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging) in 2017 and the Fishers’ Ghost Award in 2016. Her work is held in the collection of Artbank, Australia.

Huseyin Sami (b. 1979, United Kingdom; lives and works Sydney) has been exhibiting since the late 1990s, with a multi-disciplinary practice that engages with painting, sculpture and installation. Sami’s work challenges and investigates the possibilities of paint itself – working with the colour, form and materiality of household acrylic paints but without any of the tools, gestures or decisions normally associated with the medium – letting paint drop and pool and paintings to ‘virtually make themselves’. Sami’s practice poses questions and develops new strategies for the production of paintings.

Selected exhibitions include Superposition of three types, Artspace, Sydney (2017); Shut up and Paint, National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), Melbourne (2016); Whispers from a Band of Myth Makers, Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney (2015); Assemblage II, 107 Redfern Projects, Sydney (2014); Never Underestimate a Monochrome, Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art, Rancho Cucamonga, USA (2013); 3, with Koji Ryui and Brandan Van Hek, Alaska Projects, Sydney (2013); Twenty/20, UTS Gallery, Sydney and Dubbo Regional Gallery, NSW (2010); Blue Blah! And other works, Kunst Projects, Berlin, Germany (2009); and Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2004). He was the winner of the 2005 Fauvette Louriero Memorial Artists Travel Scholarship.w

Sami’s work is held in many public collections, including that of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Artbank, Australia; Saatchi & Saatchi, New Zealand, as well as in private collections in Australia, Germany, Great Britain, Japan and the United States.

 

Daniel von Sturmer (b. Auckland, New Zealand, 1972; lives and works in Melbourne) is a leading video and multimedia artist whose works investigate and orchestrate the fields of relation between things, people, light, space, video and time. von Sturmer’s practice integrates video, photography and installation and often tests the ways in which the audience views artworks inside and outside the gallery.

In 2007, von Sturmer represented Australia at the 52nd Venice Biennale, showing in the Australian Pavilion. Recent exhibitions include: Electric Light (facts/figure), Bus Projects, Melbourne (2017); Under the Sun, State Library of New South Wales, Sydney and Monash Gallery of Art, Melbourne (2017); Red Green Blue: A History of Australian Video Art, Griffith University Art Gallery, Queensland College of Art, Brisbane (2017); Collective Visions: 130 Years, Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria (2017); Shut Up and Paint, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2016); The Kaleidoscopic Turn, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2015); 21st Century Heide: The Collection Since 2000, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria (2015); Camera Ready Actions, Young Projects Gallery, Los Angeles (2014); Daniel von Sturmer, Co­lumbus Museum of Art, Ohio (2013); Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2013); Time & Vision: New work from Australian artists, The Bargehouse, London (2012); Nego­tiating this world: Contemporary Australian Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2012); Set Piece, Site Gallery, Shef­field, United Kingdom (2009); The Object of Things, Australian Pavilion, Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2007).

von Sturmer’s work is held held in a number of significant collections, including that of the Gothenburg Museum of Art, Sweden; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand; Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne; Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria; Chartwell Collection, New Zealand; Dunedin Public Art Gallery, New Zealand; The Michael Buxton Contemporary Australian Art Collection, Melbourne; Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne; Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales; and Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane.

 

Exhibition Documentation

 

 

4a-jan-18-20

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Eating Biscuit, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) biscuits, bandages and splints, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-22

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Eating Biscuit, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) biscuits, bandages and splints, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography.

4a-jan-18-13

Installation view (pre-performance): Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) acrylic on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Pre-performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-26

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Back: Lee Kun-Yong performing The method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, acrylic paint on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea.

 

4a-jan-18-38

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, The Method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, re-performed in 2018. Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. These works have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-59

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Pre-performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, The Method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1976, re-performed in 2018. Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. These works have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-64

Lee Kun-Yong performing Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

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Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Pictured: Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, performance, acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-8

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Terrorism is an enemy of Humankind (re-performed in 2017), white sheet, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) acrylic on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-9

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Left to right: Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, (re-performed in 2018), Acrylic paint on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Daniel von Sturmer, Electric Light (facts/figures/4A), 2017, animated light installation, dimensions variableLee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-4, first performed in 1976 (re-performed in 2017), dimensions variable. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-2

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Left to right: Lee Kun-Yong and Huseyin Sami, The method of Drawing 76-1-18 and Painting Performance (with feet), 2018. Acrylic paint on door, dimensions variable. Lee’s work courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Sami’s work courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery.

 

4a-feb-18-web-17

Installation detail view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Emily Parsons-Lord, a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable. Behind, left to right: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong Logic of Place, first performed in 1975, (re-printed in 2017), C-type print, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-printed in 2017) paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-4, first performed in 1976 (re-printed in 2017),paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. All courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography Image: Document Photography.

 

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Front: Emily Parsons-Lord, a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

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Front: Emily Parsons-Lord performing a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

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Front: Emily Parsons-Lord performing a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

Club 4A

MELBOURNE 17 FEBRUARY & SYDNEY 23 FEBRUARY, 2018

Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan) headline Club 4A in Sydney and Melbourne this Lunar New Year.

 

In February, 4A takes performance art back to the club. 4A has been working with some of the most exciting and adventurous performance artists over recent years and in 2018 we leave the confines of the white cube and venture into the darkness of the club! For one night only, Club 4A in Sydney and Melbourne will present some of Australia’s leading performance artists as well as acclaimed international acts.

In Melbourne on Saturday 17 February as part of White Night, Club 4A takes over the Toff in Town with Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan), with additional artists: Makeda, Strict Face, Jalé , and Coris.

In Sydney on Friday 23 February, head down to Dynasty Karaoke to see with Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan), supported by Slim Set, Tzekin (V Kim), and Jikuroux  and Coris (DJ).

Tickets for Club 4A Sydney have officially SOLD OUT.

SET TIMES

Doors: 7.00pm
Coris x Amrita Hepi: 7.00pm
Slim Set: 8.00pm
DEADKEBAB & PSYCHIC$: 9.00pm
Rainbow Chan: 10.00pm
Tzekin: 11.00pm
Jikuroux: 12.00am
DJ Plead: 1.00am
DJs b2b2b2…..: 2.00am – close

 

LISTEN // CLUB 4A Melbourne Mix // 17 Feb 2018

 

LISTEN // CLUB 4A Sydney  Mix // 23 Feb 2018

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium and Engagement – 21st Biennale of Sydney

SYDNEY. 16 MARCH – 11 JUNE 2018.

 

21st Biennale of Sydney

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

16 March – 11 June, 2018

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and other venues

Artistic Director: Mami Kataoka

 

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement will examine the theory of ‘superposition’ by investigating how it might operate in the world today. 70 leading international artists – chosen to offer a panoramic view of how opposing interpretations, can come together – will participate across seven venues. The exhibition at Artspace, Sydney will feature exceptional new projects by a diverse field of celebrated international artists.

 

Exhibiting artists at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:

Akira Takayama: Born 1969 in Saitama, Japan. Lives and works in Tokyo, Japan; Yokohama, Japan; and Frankfurt, Germany
Jun Yang: Born 1975 in Qingtian, China. Lives and works in Vienna, Austria; Taipei, Taiwan; and Yokohama, Japan

 

Biennale of Sydney

2018 marks the 45th anniversary of the Biennale of Sydney and its twenty-first edition. The Biennale provides a platform for art and ideas and is recognised for commissioning and presenting innovative, thought-provoking art from Australia and around the globe. A leading international art event, The Biennale of Sydney has showcased the work of nearly 1,800 artists from more than 100 countries. It has attracted over 4 million visitors since its inception in 1973 and holds an important place on both the national and international stage.

The Biennale of Sydney is located on the traditional lands of the Gadigal people of the Eora nation. We acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Land and pay respect to Elders, both past and present.

 

Mami Katoka, Artistic Director

Internationally renowned curator Mami Kataoka is a key figure in analysing socio-historical and generational trends, particularly in the context of Japanese and Asian art, and frequently writes and lectures on contemporary art in Asia.

She has held the position of Chief Curator of the Mori Art Museum (MAM) in Tokyo since 2009, and Senior Curator since 2003. At MAM, Kataoka has curated numerous notable exhibitions including ‘Roppongi Crossing’ (survey show of contemporary Japanese art) (2004, 2013), ‘Sensing Nature: Perception of Nature in Japan’ (2010); as well as major survey shows of prominent artists in Asia such as Tsuyoshi Ozawa, Ai Weiwei, Lee Bul, Makoto Aida, Lee Mingwei and N.S. Harsha.

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Performance x 4A

HONG KONG. 27 MARCH – 1 APRIL, 2018.

Venue: Art Central Hong Kong, 9 Lung Wo Road, Central, Hong Kong.

Building upon its critically acclaimed performance programme, Australia’s 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) returns to Art Central with a series of interactive and live works that address contemporary concerns of excess and dispossession. In an era characterised by polarities, and expansive disparity across societies, the pervasive sense of tension informs the thematic of the programme. Showcasing leading contemporary artists from across the Asia-Pacific region, the works respond directly to global unease through a series of daily on-site performances. Participating artists include: Caroline Garcia (Australia), FJ Kunting (Indonesia), Sam Lo (Singapore) as well as artist duo Sampson Wong & Lam Chi Fai (Hong Kong).

About the Artists and their Artworks: 

Sampson Wong and Lam Chi Fai’s new media installation, Pavilion for our living, contemplates the housing crisis currently affecting Hong Kong citizens. The installation invites participants to experience the micro-apartments that many Hong Kong citizens call home. Temporarily simulating one of these apartments within the art fair environs, the exhibition space becomes one of containment. Once inside the simulated space the viewer gains access to audio interviews with micro-apartment dwellers on how they navigate these literal spaces, along with the problems attached to living inside one of these homes.

Sampson Wong (b.1985) and Lam Chi Fai (b.1985) are Hong Kong based artists who have collaborated in art-making since 2010. Their collaborative works received the First Prize in Freedom Flower Awards, the Gold Award and Silver Award of ifva and were exhibited in the Hong Kong Museum of Art and the Slought Foundation. They have formed the Add Oil Team to focus on projects concerning creative activism, the collective were committedly practiced during Hong Kong‘s Umbrella Movement, and their projects have been recently exhibited in the 5th Asian Art Biennial.

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 5pm – 9pm

Tuesday 27th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

Wednesday 28th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

Thursday 29th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm & 5.30pm – 8pm

Friday 30th:12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm, 5.00pm – 6.30pm

Saturday 31st: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm, 5.00pm – 6.30pm

Sunday 1st: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

 

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Caroline Garcia’s The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures, references the seminal performances of Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Coco Fusco. Garcia’s work interrogates the anthropological phenomenon of the ‘ethnographic exhibition’, which has placed subaltern bodies on display in museums, zoos, circuses and theatres throughout history . Garcia develops and builds upon this concept in The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures where the artist’s cis-female, coloured body is encased within a vitrine, confronting degrees of politicisation, as her cultural identity and gender is put on show. The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures is a museographic dance installation that presents auto-ethnographic portraits of Garcia, bringing forth her Filipino ancestry. She engages in a durational dance ritual using a Nintendo Wii to examine the neocolonisation of popular culture and cultural tourism. Through repetition, this performance brings into question an individual’s stamina when facing expectations of cultural competence and visibility.

Caroline Garcia (b.1988) is a culturally promiscuous performance maker. She works across live performance and video through a hybridised aesthetic of cross-cultural dance, ritual practice, new media, and the sampling of popular culture and colonial imagery. In her work, Garcia centres peripheral bodies by adopting the role of shape shifter – sliding into the gaps between cultures, experiences of otherness, and timeless clichés of exotic femininity. Garcia has presented at Manila Biennale: OPENCITY2018 (Manila, Philippines), The Art Gallery of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia), Channels: The Australian Video Art Festival (Melbourne, Australia).

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Tuesday 27th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

Wednesday 28th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

Thursday 29th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Friday 30th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Saturday 31st: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Sunday 1st: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

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TALK and Goal: Strong Relationship, but first, talk! are two durational performances by Indonesian artist FJ Kunting. TALK is a durational exercise in the resistance of excess. The artist explores the struggle and the fight for his voice to be heard. Tethered to a contraption of tools and pipes he attempts to speak, however his speech is reduced to bubbles that, over time, envelop him. As exhaustion nears, the futility of his effort becomes apparent with the artist ceasing to struggle and the bubbles slowly disappear. In Kunting’s second performance, Goal: Strong Relationship, but first, talk, language remains the heart of all communication. Kunting examines the ebb and flow of conversation as two figures, faceless except for a spout, appear in a wordless discussion. Talk is reduced to a bubble exchange, with each figure conversing through a stream of bubbles. While infinitely playful, these performances reveal patterns of conversation, exchange and balance in relationships.

FJ Kunting (b.1982) is a Yogyakarta, Indonesian based artist who has been developing a performance practice since 2012. Widely regarded as one of Indonesia’s most exciting performers, Kunting is fundamentally interested in an examination of human relations and engagement. His live performances are durational and hypnotic.

Performance times: 

Tuesday 27th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Wednesday 28th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Thursday 29th: 11.30am – 12.15pm & 7.30pm – 8.15pm

Friday 30th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Saturday 31st: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Sunday 1st: 11.30am – 12.15pm

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Progress: The Game of Leaders, invites audiences to participate in a high-stakes game of imagined nation building. Artist Sam Lo poses the question: “Where will you be standing when the First World falls?” Working with giant Jenga blocks, participants are invited to prioritise and select the building blocks of their ideal society. In your nation, will economic progress be favoured over military spending? Higher standards of living or increasing globalisation? As players jockey for top position in the imaginary nation’s guidance, the structure grows more precarious and its foundations ever more compromised. The game can only end one way.

Sam Lo (b.1986), also known by the moniker SKL0, is a Singaporean contemporary artist whose work is heavily inspired by daily observations and research on the sociopolitical climate. In 2013 her practice was placed under scrutiny, following her 2013 arrest for vandalism and subsequent sentencing of 240 hours of community service, bringing issues such as public space, freedom of expression and activism to the fore.  Progress: The Game of Leaders was commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and premiered at MPavilion as part of Melbourne Festival, 2017.

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 7pm – 8pm

Tuesday 27th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Wednesday 28th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Thursday 29th: 1pm – 2.30pm & 6.30 pm -7.30pm

Friday 30th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Saturday 31st: 1pm – 2.30pm

Sunday 1st: 1pm – 2.30pm

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The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu & John Young Zerunge

YOUNG. 21 APRIL 2018.

Between November 1860 and September 1861 the New South Wales goldfields of Burrangong, near the present day township of Young, was the the site of Australia’s largest racially motivated riot. Rising antagonism over gold mining disparities and cultural habits saw trivial misunderstandings intensify into racial tensions that erupted into violence across the goldfields. Over 10 months, Chinese miners were subjected to threats, robbery and sustained acts of violence.This anti-Chinese sentiment had swept through the goldfields of Victoria in the 1850s and by the early 1860s had reached a flashpoint in New South Wales, provoking public opinion and debate. In Sydney, the NSW Parliament responded to the contention by passing legislation to restrict Chinese immigration and began, alongside Victoria and South Australia, to write the prelude to the White Australia Policy.

Informed by a series of residencies in Young and surrounding historical sites, Chinese-Australian artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge trace the events and repercussions of this period of civil disobedience. Supported by historian Dr Karen Schamberger, the artists’ research-led practice interweaves these accounts of history to create contemporary mediations that reflects upon the forces of identity, economics, race and otherness in Australia today. In April 2018 their creative investigations will be realised in Young. This collaborative history project will bear a legacy publication.

This exhibition is the first iteration of a four-part exhibition project. The second will be realised at 4A’s Haymarket home from June 29 – August 14, 2008, followed by a publication and then a public monument in Young.

YOU ARE INVITED. 

On Saturday April 21, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is leading a community event with Australian-Chinese artists John Young Zerunge and Jason Phu in response the to events of The Burrangong Affray, including the Lambing Flat Riots, 1860 -1861.

We invite the community of Young and the surrounding areas to join the artists as they create a tribute at Young Chinese Cemetary, Murrumburrah and Blackguard Gully, Young. At each site the artists will lead us in a ceremony of incense burning, offerings and ceremonial gestures to welcome good luck and banish the bad spirits of the past.

Join the artists as they mark each of they pay tribute to these sites and these historic events.

Date: Saturday 21 April 2018

Time and Location: 10am at Young Chinese Cemetary and 11:30am Blackguard Gully. Followed by an informal meeting with the artists.

Bring: Something that makes noise, a pot or a pan, a whistle, a recorder or a drum.

Contact and RSVP details: hello@4a.com.au or 9212 0380

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Jason Phu (b.1989, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Sydney) studied at COFA, Sydney graduating with honours in 2011 and NSCAD, Nova Scotia. He works across a range of mediums from installation, painting and sculpture where he traces the connections between the tradition of Chinese brush and ink painting and contemporary practice. His work has been informed by several China based residencies at CAFA, Beijing; DAC Studios, Chongqing; and Organhaus, Chongqing which has enabled him to further investigate the tradition of calligraphy. Recently Jason has had numerous solo exhibitions in Australia including Westspace, Melbourne; Nicholas Projects, Melbourne; CCAS Gorman Arts Centre, Canberra; and ALASKA PROJECTS, Sydney. He won the coveted Sulman Prize in 2015 and in the same year received a Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship which allowed him to develop his practice between China and Australia.

John Young Zerunge (b.1956, Hong Kong; lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) started his artistic practice in the 1980s with writings on conceptualism and post-modernism. Within four-decades of artistic production, Young’s oeuvre has seen various transformations within his practice of painting and installation. In the last decade his work has focused on two strands, Abstract Paintings and historical re-imaginings in the form of the History Projects; starting with Bonhoeffer in Harlem (Berlin, Bamberg) then in the last five years, projects based on the history of the Chinese Diaspora in Australia since 1840. Retrospectives of his work have been held at the TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria in 2005 and Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University Canberra in 2013 and he has been included in major exhibitions in the likes of New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Berlin.

Dr Karen Schamberger (b.1980, Australia. Lives and works in Canberra, Australia) researches and writes about Australian museums, migration and cultural diversity. Her thesis ‘Identity, belonging and cultural diversity in Australian museums’ (2016) examined the way that objects mediate relations between people of culturally diverse backgrounds in Australian history and society, as well as the roles that museums play in these relations. One of her thesis case studies traced the biography of the ‘Roll-Up No Chinese’ banner created during the 1860-61 Lambing Flat riots and now held by the Lambing Flat Folk Museum in Young, NSW.
She currently works at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as part of the curatorial team developing a new environmental history gallery.  She has previously worked in curatorial roles on the ‘Identity: Yours, Mine Ours’ exhibition (2011) at the Immigration Museum, Melbourne and the ‘Australian Journeys’ gallery (2009) at the National Museum of Australia. 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body

The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu & John Young Zerunge

SYDNEY. 29 JUNE – 12 AUGUST 2018.

Between November 1860 and September 1861 the New South Wales goldfields of Burrangong, near the present day township of Young, was the the site of Australia’s largest racially motivated riot. Rising antagonism over gold mining disparities and cultural habits saw trivial misunderstandings intensify into racial tensions that erupted into violence across the goldfields. Over 10 months, Chinese miners were subjected to threats, robbery and sustained acts of violence.This anti-Chinese sentiment had swept through the goldfields of Victoria in the 1850s and by the early 1860s had reached a flashpoint in New South Wales, provoking public opinion and debate. In Sydney, the NSW Parliament responded to the contention by passing legislation to restrict Chinese immigration and began, alongside Victoria and South Australia, to write the prelude to the White Australia Policy.

Through a series of residencies in Young and surrounding historical sites, Chinese-Australian artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge trace the events and repercussions of this period of civil disobedience. Supported by historian Dr Karen Schamberger, the artists’ research-led practice interweaves these accounts of history to create contemporary mediations that reflects upon the forces of identity, economics, race and otherness in Australia today. This collaborative history project will bear a legacy publication.

This exhibition is the second iteration of a four-part exhibition project. The first was be realised in Young in April. 2018.

Jason Phu (b.1989, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Sydney) studied at COFA, Sydney graduating with honours in 2011 and NSCAD, Nova Scotia. He works across a range of mediums from installation, painting and sculpture where he traces the connections between the tradition of Chinese brush and ink painting and contemporary practice. His work has been informed by several China based residencies at CAFA, Beijing; DAC Studios, Chongqing; and Organhaus, Chongqing which has enabled him to further investigate the tradition of calligraphy. Recently Jason has had numerous solo exhibitions in Australia including Westspace, Melbourne; Nicholas Projects, Melbourne; CCAS Gorman Arts Centre, Canberra; and ALASKA PROJECTS, Sydney. He won the coveted Sulman Prize in 2015 and in the same year received a Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship which allowed him to develop his practice between China and Australia.

John Young Zerunge (b.1956, Hong Kong; lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) started his artistic practice in the 1980s with writings on conceptualism and post-modernism. Within four-decades of artistic production, Young’s oeuvre has seen various transformations within his practice of painting and installation. In the last decade his work has focused on two strands, Abstract Paintings and historical re-imaginings in the form of the History Projects; starting with Bonhoeffer in Harlem (Berlin, Bamberg) then in the last five years, projects based on the history of the Chinese Diaspora in Australia since 1840. Retrospectives of his work have been held at the TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria in 2005 and Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University Canberra in 2013 and he has been included in major exhibitions in the likes of New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Berlin.

Dr Karen Schamberger (b.1980, Australia. Lives and works in Canberra, Australia) researches and writes about Australian museums, migration and cultural diversity. Her thesis ‘Identity, belonging and cultural diversity in Australian museums’ (2016) examined the way that objects mediate relations between people of culturally diverse backgrounds in Australian history and society, as well as the roles that museums play in these relations. One of her thesis case studies traced the biography of the ‘Roll-Up No Chinese’ banner created during the 1860-61 Lambing Flat riots and now held by the Lambing Flat Folk Museum in Young, NSW.

She currently works at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as part of the curatorial team developing a new environmental history gallery.  She has previously worked in curatorial roles on the ‘Identity: Yours, Mine Ours’ exhibition (2011) at the Immigration Museum, Melbourne and the ‘Australian Journeys’ gallery (2009) at the National Museum of Australia. 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body

 

Exhibition documentation

 

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John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. Jason Phu, Do not stick your hand in the fire, sit near it and observe the stars, 2018, framed editioned photograph on paper, 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, framed digital photographic series on paper, 2 works, each work 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, The Field, 2018, HD video, 8.05 minutes. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, objects from the performance Action: Covering at Blackguard Gully, Young, 21.04.2018: metal bucket, spade, felt blankets. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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John Young Zerunge, The Field, 2018, HD video, 8.05 minutes, installation view. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, Do not stick your hand in the fire, sit near it and observe the stars, 2018, framed editioned photograph on paper, 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, framed digital photographic series on paper, 2 works, each work 1212 x 812mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Installation view, clockwise, from left:
Jason Phu, ROLLING ROLLS ROLLED ROLL, 2018, ink on sheet, dimensions variable, 4 works, each work 1200 x 1200mm. John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Installation view, clockwise, from left:
Jason Phu, ROLLING ROLLS ROLLED ROLL, 2018, ink on sheet, dimensions variable, 4 works, each work 1200 x 1200mm. John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, installation view, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm, commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
4a-documentation-june18-18
Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.

Temporary Certainty

SYDNEY. 31 AUGUST – 14 OCTOBER 2018.


Rushdi Anwar 

Alana Hunt 
Sarker Protick 

Temporary Certainty is shaped by an investigation of sudden shifts of historical change wrought by complex interventions in the greater Asia region. Showcasing new works from Australian artists Rushdi Anwar and Alana Hunt alongside a new body of work from Sarker Protick, this exhibition brings together three distinct voices that share long-standing commitments to humanitarian and activist concerns. With a focus on Bengal, Kurdistan and the Kimberley region of Western Australia, Temporary Certainty explores how artists approach geography as a marker of the consequences of broader geopolitical expediencies.

The three distinct geographical contexts represented in this exhibition, each with their seemingly disparate environmental challenges and contingencies, are here connected by the way the artists have explored questions of nationalisms, the legacies of sovereignty, and contested narratives of memorialisation. Equally defined by more urgent concerns and experiences of displacement and transience, the works presented in Temporary Certainty are distinguished by their emergence within conditions of uneasy reconciliation. Additionally, a common thread between each artist’s vision across the works presented in this exhibition is the central importance of the photographic image as a medium that excels at mediating between space and time, reality and illusion. The artists utilise this visual language, alongside other mediums and methodologies, in a shared pursuit of seeking to unveil the symbolic resonances that inhabit built environments within fractured contexts.

Alana Hunt’s activities as an artist are defined by her commitment to broadening and challenging the possibilities of communicating ideas in the public realm. For Temporary Certainty, Hunt has created a new work, Faith in a pile of stones (2018), that takes as its focus Lake Argyle. Located near the artist’s home in the town of Kununurra, Lake Argyle was constructed in 1971 (and filled by 1974), following the damming of the Ord River. An immense human-engineered reservoir of freshwater whose capacity is more than eighteen times the volume of Sydney Harbour, its construction for the purpose of irrigation for agricultural production drowned places of significance and altered the ecologies of country belonging primarily to Miriwoong, but also Gija and Malgnin people. Hunt reconfigures the monumental aspect of the dam wall in a work that explores the convergence of the bureaucratic management of natural resources driven by colonial dreams of development that have been shaped by faith in the idea of permanence.

Rushdi Anwar presents two works that are deeply related to the artist’s experiences as a member of the Kurdish diaspora. The video and sound installation Facing Living: The Past in the Present (2015) shows a pair of hands that proceed to tear up and piece back together an official portrait of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein until the image is overwhelmed by black adhesive tape, an act that balances between destruction and creation, erasure and elegy for those who suffered under Hussein’s rule. We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire (2018) is the artist’s response to his recent experience of entering a church in the town of Bashiqa located in north east Mosul, part of disputed territories between the Kurdistan Regional Government and Iraqi government. This work explores unsettling similarities between the destruction, transience and renewal faced by displaced and uprooted communities globally and the built environments they are forced to leave.

Sarker Protick’s Exodus (2015–ongoing) considers the expediencies of decolonisation while at the same time being a haunting meditation on the universal contingencies of time. Over a selection of photographs and moving image, the artist explores the decaying buildings and surrounding lands of the feudal estates in East Bengal that were previously owned by Hindu jamindars, or landlords. Following the Liberation War of 1971 that abruptly established the newly independent nation of Bangladesh, huge migrations took place across Bengal. This saw wealthy Hindu landowners abandon their estates for India in fear of the kind of violent reprisals that had erupted following the Partition of India in 1947, while at the same time many Muslims fled West Bengal heading east. A series of controversial laws dating from 1948, culminating in the Vested Property Act of 1974, allowed the confiscation of property by Bangladeshi authorities from groups declared ‘enemies of the state’. Since then, these estates have commonly been left in disrepair, taken over by nature and appropriated by local villagers—another chapter in a landscape indelibly marked by the influence of Mughal rule and British imperialism (1).

Grappling with tensions between certainty and doubt, permanence and all that is ephemeral, Temporary Certainty contemplates the value of what can be apprehended—much less held onto—with any guarantee in an age lurching towards ever greater polarisation.

Temporary Certainty is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Rushdi Anwar’s commissioned work has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body. The presentation of Sarker Protick’s Exodus has been supported by The Esplanade, Singapore, with additional support from the Australian Centre for Photography.

(1) Sarker Protick’s Exodus was internationally premiered in the exhibition The Life of Things at The Esplanade, Singapore, from 19 January to 8 April 2018. This text incorporates aspects of curator Sam I-shan’s accompanying text for this exhibition. 


Artists:

Rushdi Anwar (b. Halabja, Kurdistan) is a Melbourne-based artist, currently working between Australia and Thailand. His installation, sculpture, painting, photo-painting and video work often reflect on socio-political issues relating to Kurdistan, Iraq and the Middle East. He explores these issues through an investigation of form, utilising a material vocabulary and different processes of making. Anwar was educated in Kurdistan and Australia, studying at the Institute of Kirkuk- Kurdistan and Enmore Design Centre/Sydney Institute. He holds a Master of Fine Art (2010) and a PhD in Fine Art (2016) from RMIT University, Melbourne. He has held solo and group exhibitions widely in Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Kurdistan, Norway, Switzerland, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and USA. Recent and upcoming exhibitions include 12th Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2018), and the 13th Havana Biennial, Cuba (2019). Anwar’s works are held in the collections of the Australian War Memorial, the Kurdistan Regional Government, and in private collections. He has curated exhibitions in Kurdistan (2010), Thailand (2012, 2015), and Australia (2013). Following several artist-in-residence programs in Thailand, he co-founded and co-coordinated the Australian Thai Artist Interchange, Melbourne (2012–2016), an organisation founded to enhance cross-cultural exchange, awareness and appreciation of art and culture between Thais and Australians. Rushdi is a founding member, with Brook Andrew and Shiraz Bayjoo, of the artist collective The Working Collection.

Alana Hunt (b. 1984, Sydney) makes contemporary art, writes and produces culture through a variety of media across public, gallery and online spaces. She lives on Miriwoong country in the north-west of Australia and has a long-standing engagement with South Asia. The politics of nation making and the colonial past and present of Australia and South Asia are central to her practice. Since 2009, she has orchestrated participatory art and publishing projects that have activated different media forms in the public sphere to shed light on Kashmir. Paper txt msgs from Kashmir (2009–2011) prompted media in India and Pakistan to speak about a state-wide mobile phone ban they had previously been silent on. This work won the Fauvette Laureiro Artist Scholarship. In 2016, the seven-year participatory memorial Cups of nun chai circulated as a newspaper serial in Kashmir, reaching thousands of people on a weekly basis during a period of civilian uprising and state oppression. This work won the 2017 Incinerator Art Award. Her essay, A mere drop in the sea of what is, published by 4A Papers (Issue 1, November 2016), explored the art circulating on the ‘streets of social media’ in Kashmir and made it into the Hansard Report of the Australian Parliament. In 2018, Alana undertook a residency in Sulawesi with Rumata Art Space & the Makassar International Writers’ Festival and will present Cups of nun chai at Tufts University Art Gallery, Massachusetts, and a series of artists presentations at Tufts, Brown, and Parsons universities. Her work is held in both public and private collections including Artbank and the Macquarie Group Collection.

Sarker Protick (b. 1986, Bangladesh) is a Dhaka-based artist whose work explores the possibilities of time, light and sound. His portraits, landscapes and photographic series engage philosophically with the specificities of personal and national histories. Sarker’s approach across various mediums incorporates detailed observations and subtle gestures as a means of creating personal spaces, often minimal and atmospheric. He was named in British Journal of Photography’s annual ‘Ones to Watch’ and Photo District News’ (PDN) 30 emerging photographers of the year. Sarker is the recipient of Joop Swart Masterclass, World Press Photo award, and Australian Photobook of the Year grand prize. His body of work Exodus was awarded the Magnum Foundation Grant 2018. Sarker’s work has been shown in museums, galleries and photo festivals internationally, including Art Dubai; Paris Photo; Singapore Art Week; Dhaka Art Summit; Chobi Mela International Photography Festival, Dhaka; Latvian Contemporary Museum of Photography, Riga; and Noorderlicht International Photofestival, Netherlands. Sarker is a faculty member at Pathshala South Asian Media Institute, Dhaka, and currently represented by East Wing Gallery, Dubai.

 

Exhibition Documentation

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Installation view of Temporary Certainty a t 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, clockwise left to right: Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (f rom the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photographs (selection of 19); 22.5 x 28.0 cm (each photograph); courtesy the artist. Sarker Protick, Arrival (from the series Exodus) , 2015–ongoing, single-channel HD video and sound installation; 8:00 mins; courtesy the artist. Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (from the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photograph; 127.0 x 101.5 cm; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski


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Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (from the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photographs (selection of 19); 22.5 x 28.0 cm (each photograph); courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Installation view of Temporary Certainty a t 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, left to right: Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses

SYDNEY. 2 NOVEMBER – 16 DECEMBER 2018.

All Blessings, All Curses presents recent and newly commissioned works by Sydney-based artist, Justine Youssef. Born in the heart of Western Sydney, Youssef’s practice negates the stifling white heat of global xenophobia with deeply personal and universal ruminations that layer the smell, sights and textures of her ancestral homeland, Lebanon.

The strength of Justine Youssef’s practice lies in the poetics of her storytelling and observations: a teacher blackens Arabic script, fearing that it contains a religious hate message; a smoke detector deafeningly sounds as a mother burns bakhoor to rid the house of the evil eye; the looks of confusion two girls receive as they scrub clean a Persian rug in their driveway. These scenes represent the lived experience of the artist who transforms everyday occurrences into visual metaphors.

Justine Youssef’s intuitive methodology draws upon this archive of personal memories as a departure point for All blessing, all curses. Employing sculpture, video, installation and text, Youssef examines the difficult experiences of misunderstanding with the grand subjects of faith, love, family and home. In doing so, she creates immersive experiences that are both epic and intimate – whispering invocations of promise, comfort and resistance.

Justine Youssef (b. 1992) is currently living on the unceded territory of the Darug peoples. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art from the National Art School, Sydney, Australia and is currently working from the Parramatta Artist Studios. She has been awarded the New South Wales Artists’ Grant (NAVA and Create NSW), as well as a studio residency at Blacktown Arts. She has held collaborative solo exhibitions at Seventh Gallery, Melbourne, and Firstdraft, Woolloomooloo with Duha Ali in 2018, and has participated in group exhibitions at Airspace Projects, Marrickville; Bankstown Art Center, Bankstown; Sullivan+Strumpf, Zetland; and Collab Gallery, Chippendale. Her work can be found in the collections of the National Association for the Visual Arts; the National Art School Drawing Archive; and the Sydney Gallery School.

Exhibition Documentation

All images: Kai Wasikowski

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Exterior view of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, In gallery interior: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, dimensions variable, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, dimensions variable, Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Left: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Right: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.
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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. 

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Front left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

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Front left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front right: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Centre Front: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Middle Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Leila El Rayes, Burying that which binds into the chest of my beloved, 2018, photographic documentation (of single channel video, 6 minutes), 2 photographs, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Leila El Rayes, Burying that which binds into the chest of my beloved, 2018, photographic documentation (of single channel video, 6 minutes), 2 photographs, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

 

Accessory

5 – 15 May 1999

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Peter Atkins, Sylvia Chan, Collette Dinnigan, Dinosaur Designs, Natasha Ivachoff, Kewday Skateboards, Li Liang, Ron Muncaster, Pol Nettleton, Bronwyn Oliver, Scott Redford, Nike Savvas and Miles Whippy.

Art meets fashion in an exciting exhibition at Gallery 4A. Accessory is an exhibition exploring creative links between fashion and art through a series of collaborations with fashion designers and artists.

Each fashion designer has been matched up with a contemporary artist to create an artwork that reveals innovation within both disciplines. For example Collette Dinnigan’s lace creations are featured alongside 1994 Moet & Chandon Prize winner, Bronwyn Oliver’s delicate whimsical wire sculptures.

Another collaboration features objects by Dinosaur Designs and a painting by Peter Atkins (representative for Australia in the Indian Triennale in 1994), both inspired a swatch of bold, geometric Marimekko fabric from the ’60’s. Natasha Ivachoff of PIGSINSPACE is working with funky young artist, Miles Whippy to create a fashion narrative in photographs.

Accessory continues Gallery 4A’s commitment to fashion and art. Gallery 4A recently held a banquet and fashion parade featuring designs by Akira, Nelson Leong, ninetysix, Sylvia Chan and Wayne Cooper. Exhibitions at Gallery 4A have been featured in Vogue, Harpers Bazaar, Business Review Weekly and regularly in the Sydney Morning Herald.

Accessory is an event of the Mercedes Australian Fashion Week festival.

Header image: Dinosaur Designs and Peter Atkins, Melooni and Maija Isola’s “Melooni” Form c.1963, 1999, 8 oval side plates, 2 large oval platters, 3 organic oval dishes, 1 large organic oval offering dish, 1 Melooni mobile, enamel and oil on canvas.

Regina Walter: Everyday Elegance

13 – 29 August 1998

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Part of the Signs and Wonders project.
Catalogue available in the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art library.

An enticingly beautiful installation by Regina Walter (b. 1970, Sydney). The entire gallery is filled with industrial-sized white inflated plastic bags. The artist’s intention is to make us reconsider the blank or negative space within the gallery.


Documentation

regina-walter-untitled

Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition

Presented as part of Sydney Contemporary – 7 – 10 September 2017 

Is there something truly universal nowadays, when human conception about value has been influenced by many factors and layered dimensions? What is more valuable when all of this factors and dimensions are detached? The answer then refers to “time”. Hahan observes that human’s process, actions, opportunities, predictions, and hopes cannot be separated from time.

Join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Hahan at Sydney Contemporary 2017 for your chance to become part of an experimental art market in Speculative Entertainment No. 1 Sydney Edition.

Speculative Entertainment No.1” is an ongoing project that developed from Hahan’s experiments about time and privilege, as well as an interest to experiment with the art market and use it as medium. This work is intended to hack the art market, and particularly to hack the artwork collecting system which usually limited. This work was initially exhibited during ARTJOG 9 (2016), an annual artist-based art fair in Yogyakarta, and has also been presented in conjunction with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian art at Art Central Hong Kong (2017).

This work consists of a 7.5 m x 2.6 m painting which is divided into 1,619 square lots. Each lot is sized 10 cm square and the price for each lot is twice the entrance fee of the art fair. During the exhibition period at scheduled time, the audience can become “collectors” with the same opportunities, hopes, privileges, and speculations by choosing any lot they want at the venue. The audience members who purchase the lot(s) are encouraged to speculate by re-selling it according to their own speculative price and Hahan, as the artist, will charge 10% commission from the selling.

 

About the artist:

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan (1983, Kebumen, Indonesia) lives and works in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. Hahan’s art making is concerned with the tussle between ‘high art’ and ‘low art’, blurring realism with decoration. Hahan incorporates film, music and street culture into a distinct visual language, creating a sense of movement and spontaneity in what can be described as a topsy-turvy reality steeped in satirical humor. In recent years, he attempts to display an art with the concept that emphasises the interaction with the visitors and relate it with the development of art in global as well as its society. He also one of the founders of Ace House Collective, a young artists’ collective and initiative space based in Yogyakarta which trying to capture the culture of Indonesian contemporary society through multidiscipline work process, collaboration, and research.His works have been collected by several art museum including Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) Brisbane, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Melbourne, Australia.

 

Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Project 11. 4A would like to thank Project 11 for their generous support of this project.

PROJECT11LOGO

 

Documentation:

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

Symposium – When South is North: contemporary art and culture in South Asia and Australia

SYDNEY. 16 AUG 2017.

 

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, in association with the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University, presents:

When South is North:  contemporary art and culture in South Asia and Australia

Wednesday 16th August, 2017

1 PSQ (1 Parramatta Square), Western Sydney University
169 Macquarie Street,
Parramatta City

Free, registrations required.

 

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University invite you to join us for 4A’s 2017 symposium, When South is North: contemporary art and culture in South Asia and Australia.

With local and international speakers drawn from all over South Asia, this symposium is led by artists, cultural commentators, scholars and grass-roots workers who understand the real issues which affect art and culture from the region.  With keynote presentations from artists Adeela Suleman (Pakistan) and Reena Kallat (India) and curator and Director Vidya Shivadas (India)– plus a wide range of Australian-based artists, academics, politicians, community workers and more – When South is North aims to build dialogue around South Asia and Australia in a contemporary arts context.

The focus of the day will be on question-making, debate and discussion – focusing on the hows and whys within the region’s contemporary art and cultural landscapes.

 

A day-long symposium, this event is free to attend, but RSVPs are required as catering will be included for all registered attendees.

 

When South is North – Symposium Schedule:


9.00 – 10.00    Registration 


10.00 – 10.15  Welcome

| Prof. Paul JAMES, Western Sydney University, Director, Institute of Society and Culture

| Dr. Mikala TAI, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art


10.00 – 10.30  Opening Presentation

 | Speaker: Associate Professor Devleena GHOSH

| Associate Professor Devleena Ghosh of the University of Technology, Sydney, sets the tone for the day, discussing her fields of research in colonial, postcolonial, environmental and global studies, specifically in the Indian Ocean region.


10.30AM – 11.30AM Focus Presentation

 | Speaker: Reena KALLAT (India)

Session supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.

| Reena Kallat’s practice spans drawing, photography, sculpture and video and engages diverse materials, imbued with conceptual underpinnings. She has widely exhibited at institutions across the world such as Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), New York; Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; Vancouver Art Gallery; Saatchi Gallery, London;  Helsinki City Art Museum, Finland; National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul; Casa Asia, Madrid and Barcelona; Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney;  Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai;  amongst many others.  Here, Kallat discusses her practice and experiences of working across cultural boundaries.


11.30AM – 1.00PM Panel 1 – Art in, of, from, South Asia? Artists working across cultures and geographies.

 | Moderator: Pedro DE ALMEIDA

| Speakers: Reena KALLAT (India), Ramesh Mario NITHIYENDRAN, Nusra Latif QURESHI, Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan) and Abdullah M.I SYED

Session supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.

| The politics and geography of South Asia are neither neutral or exact. Artists from this region continue to undergo post-colonial cultural and political processes of national building, whereby issues of freedom of speech, national identity-making and economic forces continue to revise and re-invent art making practices and art historical study. Drawing together artists from across Australia and South Asia, this panel discusses artists’ experiences working within and outside South Asian contexts in contemporary art.


1.00PM – 2.30PM Lunch Break/Networking/Parramatta Artist Studios Visit

Thanks to the generous support of the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney, lunch will be provided for all registered attendees from 1PM. From 1.30PM, attendees are invited to attend our optional Parramatta Artists Studios tour:

1.30 – 2.30pm: Parramatta Artists Studios: Open Studios
2 Minute Walk from PS1
Level 1 & 2, 68 Macquarie St, Parramatta
Tour and artist talks with Marikit Santiago and Kalanjay Dhir begins at 1.45pm
Meet Parramatta Artists Studios artists and see works in progress from artists working across artistic disciplines. 2017 artists include Khadim Ali, Kate Beckingham, Penelope Cain, Emma Fielden, Annie McKinnon, Salote Tawale, Hannah Toohey, Cigdem Aydemir, Harriet Body, Kalanjay Dhir, Caroline Garcia, Anna McMahon, Marikit Santiago, Shireen Taweel and Garry Trinh.


2.30PM – 3.30PM Focus Presentation

 | Speaker: Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

|  Vidya Shivadas is the Director of the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art, and a curator based in New Delhi. After her Bachelors in Sociology from Delhi University and a Masters in Art Criticism from Faculty of Fine Arts, MS University of Baroda, she joined Vadehra Art Gallery in 2002. She has curated exhibitions at the Gallery which include Something I’ve been meaning to tell you (with Sunil Gupta), April 2011; Faiza Butt, Ruby Chishti, Masooma Syed (three Pakistani women artists), April 2009; Fluid Structures: Gender and Abstraction in India, April 2008; among others. In 2009, she was a guest curator at Devi Art Foundation and worked on the solo exhibition of Bangladeshi artist Mahbubur Rahman. In 2007, she was invited to participate in the educational programming for Documenta 12 from May to September 2007 in Kassel, Germany.


3.30PM – 5.00PM Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia

 | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI

| Speakers: Sunil BADAMI, Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

Through census data, in 2011, close to 1 million Australians identified as of South Asian background. This panel will explore the work of prominent organisations and institutions who have made significant impacts on South Asian art and culture in Australia. Our panelists, with backgrounds encompassing policy-making, community arts, literature and media, will unpack what guides cultural decision making and how these decisions impact history, artistic output and authenticity.


5.00PM – 6.00PM Networking drinks

Thanks to the generous support of the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney, drinks will be provided for all registered attendees.


6.00PM – 6.45PM Keynote Presentation

 | Speaker: Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan)

With an introduction from Phillip KEIR. The Keir Foundation has co-commissioned Adeela’s work as part of 4A’s associated exhibition, I don’t want to be there when it happens.

| Internationally regarded artist, coordinator of Vasl Artists’ Collective in Karachi, and Associate Professor and Head of the Fine Art Department at Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture, Adeela Suleman is a force to be reckoned with. In this keynote presentation, Suleman will discuss her experience as an artist, educator in Karachi, Pakistan and the violence and censorship she has encountered in her work.


 

6.45PM – 7.00PM Questions from the audience and concluding remarks

 | Speakers: Distinguished Professor Ien ANG, Western Sydney University, with Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan)

| Questions from the audience to Adeela Suleman will be moderated by and followed with concluding remarks and thank you from Distinguished Professor Ien Ang, Western Sydney University

 


SPEAKER LIST 

 | Professor Ien Ang

| Distinguished Professor Ien Ang is a Professor of Cultural Studies and was the founding Director of the Institute for Culture and Society. She is one of the leaders in cultural studies worldwide, with interdisciplinary work spanning many areas of the humanities and social sciences. Her books, including Watching Dallas, Desperately seeking the audience and On not speaking Chinese, are recognised as classics in the field and her work has been translated into many languages. Her current ARC research project is entitled Sydney’s Chinatown in the Asian Century: from Ethnic Enclave to Global Hub (with Donald McNeill and Kay Anderson in collaboration with the City of Sydney). She currently chairs an Expert Working Group on Asia Literacy: Language and Beyond, for the Australian Council of Learned Academies’ Securing Australia’s Future program. She complted her PhD, 1990, Social and Cultural Sciences, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, a Doctorandus/Mphil, 1982, Mass Communication, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Kandidaats/BA, 1977, Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

 | Sunil Badami

| Sunil Badami is a bon vivant, raconteur and flâneur. He’s also a writer, performer, academic and broadcaster. He’s written for publications including The Sydney Morning Herald, Good Weekend, The Australian, The Monthly, The New Daily, The Australian Literary Review, Australian Gourmet Traveller, Art and Australia, Seizure, Southerly, Westerly, Island and Meanjin, and his work has been published in anthologies in Australia and overseas, including in Best Australian Stories and Best Australian Essays.  In addition to regularly chairing and hosting launches, events and festivals, he’s appeared on stage at the Sydney and Melbourne Writers’ Festivals and the Belvoir Street and Griffin Theatres. He presented the national ABC Local Radio show Sunday Takeaway, and continues to appear regularly on ABC TV, ABC Local Radio, Double J and Radio National, where his documentary Riddle. Mystery. Enigma was nominated for the prestigious Prix Marulić. He was also the final Grand Champion of the long-running TV quiz show Sale of the Century. He’s currently editing his novel for publication.

 | Pedro de Almeida

| Pedro de Almeida has been program manager at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art since 2012. Pedro’s critical writing on art is published regularly, appearing in ArtAsiaPacific, Art Monthly Australasia, Broadsheet Journal, LEAP, Photofile and un Magazine among others. He is editor of 4A Papers, a newly established online platform for writing on contemporary art and culture in the Asia Pacific region, and is a member of Broadsheet Journal’s international editorial advisory board. Pedro recently participated in the Experimenter Curators’ Hub 2017, Kolkata, an annual platform for developing and sustaining discourse on curatorial practice and exhibition making through critical discussion and debate.

 | Melanie Eastburn

| Melanie Eastburn is Senior Curator of Asian art at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. From 2004 until 2016 she was Curator of Asian art at the National Gallery of Australia. Melanie has also worked at the National Museum of Cambodia in Phnom Penh, 2003-2004, and the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney 2001-2003. She was closely involved in negotiating the long-term loans to the NGA from the National Museum of Cambodia and has curated a number of exhibitions including: Glorious: earthly pleasures and heavenly realms, AGNSW, from May 2017; Time, light, Japan, AGNSW, December 2016 – May 2017; The story of Rama: Indian miniatures from the National Museum, New Delhi (coordinating curator; curator: Dr Vijay Mathur), NGA, 2015; Divine worlds: Indian painting, NGA, 2012; Black robe, white mist: art of the Japanese Buddhist nun Rengetsu, NGA, 2007; Fruits: Tokyo street style, Powerhouse Museum, 2002
  | Dr Mehreen Faruqi

| Dr Mehreen Faruqi joined the NSW Legislative Council in June 2013 and is the first Muslim woman elected to any Parliament in Australia. Prior to this she was the Director of the Institute of Environmental Studies at University of NSW and an Associate Professor in Business and Sustainability. She is a civil and environmental engineer with a PHD in Environmental Engineering. Since migrating from Pakistan to Australia in 1992, with her young family, Mehreen’s work has focused on developing real solutions to social and environmental challenges.

 | Amrit Gill

| Amrit Gill is Senior Manager, International Projects at the Australia Council for the Arts. Amrit has over 10 years’ experience in the Australian arts sector in community arts and cultural development, social enterprise, and international cultural relations. At the Australia Council she has managed the review of international residencies programs as well as the implementation of the Council’s first international arts strategy. Prior to joining the Australia Council, Amrit worked at Milk Crate Theatre, the British Council, and Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE). She holds a Bachelor of Art Theory/Arts from the University of New South Wales.

 | Devleena Ghosh

| Devleena Ghosh teaches in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Technology Sydney. She has researched and published widely on the cultural and political relationships between the British colonies of India and Australia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as well as on coal and climate change in India and Australia. She is the recipient of the WangGung Wu Award for best article (“Burma-Bengal Crossings: Intercolonial Relationships in Pre-Independence India”) in the Asian Studies Review in 2016.

 | Professor Paul James

| Professor Paul James is a professor of Globalisation and Cultural Diversity at Western Sydney University, and has been the Director of the Institute for Culture and Society since 2014. He is a social theorist and writes on topics related to globalisation, sustainability, social change and the human condition. Paul James has been an editor and author of roughly thirty books, most importantly he brought out a 16 volume series called ‘Central Currents in Globalization’, which maps all the older disciplnes in the social sciences and humanities. He is the Research Director for the international organisation Global Reconcilliation. He is on the Council of the Institute of Postcolonial Studies, Honary Professor at King’s College London, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts (London). He is editor of Arena Journal, as well as an editor/board-member of nine other international journals, including Globalizations and Global Governance. He completed his PhD, 1991, Ashworth Social Theory Centre, Department of History and Philosophy Science, University of Melbourne, and his BA (Hons), 1981, Department of Political Science, University of Melbourne.

| Reena Saini Kallat

| Reena Saini Kallat’s (b. 1973, Delhi, India) practice spans drawing, photography, sculpture and video engages diverse materials, imbued with conceptual underpinnings. She has widely exhibited at institutions across the world such as Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), New York; Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; Kennedy Centre, Washington; Vancouver Art Gallery; Saatchi Gallery, London; SESC Pompeia and SESC Belenzino, Sao Paulo; Helsinki City Art Museum, Finland; Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel; National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul; Casa Asia, Madrid and Barcelona; ZKM Karlsruhe, Germany; Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney; Hangar Bicocca, Milan; Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai; Chicago Cultural Centre amongst many others.  Her works are part of several public and private collections including the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taiwan; Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada; Initial Access (Frank Cohen Collection), UK; Fondazione Golinelli, Italy; Bhaudaji Lad Museum, Mumbai; National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi; Ermenegildo Zegna Group, Italy and Burger Collection, Hong Kong amongst others.

| Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran

| Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran (b. 1988 Colombo Sri-Lanka, Australia from 1989) Sri Lankan-born, Sydney-based artist Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran creates rough-edged, vibrant, new-age idols that are at once enticing and disquieting. He experiments with form and scale in the context of figurative sculpture to explore politics of sex, the monument, gender and religion. Formally trained in painting and drawing his practice has a sculptural emphasis which champions the physicality of art making. He has exhibited at various spaces and contexts including the Art Gallery of South Australia’s flagship exhibition, the 2016 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art and The National: New Australian Art 2017. He has presented solo exhibitions at the National Gallery of Australia, The Ian Potter Museum of Art and the Shepparton Art Museum. In 2014, Nithiyendran was awarded the 2014 NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (emerging) administered through Artspace. In 2015, he was the winner of the 2015 Sidney Myer Fund Australian Ceramic Award, Australia’s richest and premier award for artists working in the medium of ceramics. Forthcoming exhibitions include a solo presentation at the 2018 Dhaka Art Summit. His work is held in various collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of South Australia, Artbank, The Ian Potter Museum of Art and the Shepparton Art Museum.

 | Gary Paramanathan

| Gary Paramanathan works at the intersection of arts, culture and community. Currently working at AFTRS, he has previously worked at Fairfield City Council, Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE) and collaborated with a number of arts and cultural organisations. Gary Paramanathan was born in Sri Lanka. His foray into arts comes after completing a Bachelor of Commerce at The University of Sydney, and finding nothing amusing about a nine to five job. Gary is the founder and director of Colourfest Film Festival (2010-2017). He holds a Masters of International Communication from Macquarie University and also writes for the South Asian Australian blog southerncrossings.com.au. He hopes to please his brown parents someday by making lots of money and procuring a Dr. in front of his name.

 | Nusra Latif Qureshi

| Nusra Latif Qureshi – 1973; arrived Melbourne 2001; lives and works Melbourne. Nusra Latif Qureshi trained in Lahore in the Mughal miniature painting tradition and has developed an extraordinary contemporary painting practice that engages with the rich, visual histories of South Asia. Qureshi is recognized as an important member of a generation of Pakistani artists who have revived and innovated the traditional art of Mughal miniature painting. Qureshi lectured at the National School of Art in Lahore from 1995 to 1999, and immigrated to Australia in 2001 to take up postgraduate study. She has shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions across Asia, the United States, Europe and Australia.

| S. Shakthidharan

| Shakthi is the founder and artistic director of Western Sydney arts company CuriousWorks. His current projects are in partnership with, or have appeared at, Sydney Film Festival, Belvoir Theatre and Streaming Museum (New York). Shakthi was Associate Artist at Carriageworks from 2013-2015. In 2015 he was awarded the Phillip Parson’s Playwright Award from Belvoir Theatre and in 2011 the Kirk Robson by Australia Council for the Arts, given to an artist for their work in relation to social justice and community cultural leadership.

| Vidya Shivadas

| Vidya Shivadas is the Director of the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art, and a curator based in New Delhi. After her Bachelors in Sociology from Delhi University and a Masters in Art Criticism from Faculty of Fine Arts, MS University of Baroda, she joined Vadehra Art Gallery in 2002. She has curated exhibitions at the Gallery which include Something I’ve been meaning to tell you (with Sunil Gupta), April 2011; Faiza Butt, Ruby Chishti, Masooma Syed (three Pakistani women artists), April 2009; Fluid Structures: Gender and Abstraction in India, April 2008; among others. In 2009, she was a guest curator at Devi Art Foundation and worked on the solo exhibition of Bangladeshi artist Mahbubur Rahman. In 2007, she was invited to participate in the educational programming for Documenta 12 from May to September 2007 in Kassel, Germany.

| Adeela Suleman

| Adeela Suleman – Born 1970 in Karachi, Pakistan. Suleman studied Sculpture at the Indus Valley School of Art and completed a Master’s degree in International Relations from the University of Karachi. She is currently the Coordinator of Vasl Artists’ Collective in Karachi, in addition to being Associate Professor and Head of the Fine Art Department at Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture. Suleman has participated extensively with group and solo exhibitions worldwide, including Phantoms of Asia at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, the 2013 Asian Art Biennial at the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art, Hanging Fire – Contemporary Art from Pakistan at The Asia Society, New York; Gallery Rohtas 2, Lahore; Canvas Gallery, Karachi; Aicon Gallery, New York; and, the International Exhibition of Contemporary Art, Bologna, Italy (2008). Reviews and features of work appear in Artforum and the New York Times, among other publications. The artist lives and works in Karachi, Pakistan.

 | Dr. Abdullah M.I. Syed

| Dr. Abdullah M.I. Syed – (b. 1974, Karachi Pakistan) is a contemporary artist and designer working between Sydney, Karachi and New York. Trained in diverse disciplines, his art practice weaves religious, cultural and socio-political narratives of east and west, seamlessly knitting together art historical references and concerns from each. Syed holds a PhD in Art, Media and Design (2016) and a Master of Fine Arts (2009) from University of New South Wales, Sydney. Syed’s works have been featured in nine solo exhibitions and several national and international curated group exhibitions.

 | Dr. Mikala Tai

| Mikala Tai is a curator, researcher and academic specialising in contemporary Asian art and Australian design, who over the past decade has collaborated with local, national and international organisations to strengthen ties between Australia and Asia. Mikala currently sits on the board of BUS Projects, Melbourne. She is on the Chinese New Year Festival Advisory Panel, and is an Editorial Advisor for UnMagazine as well as a seasonal lecturer and tutor at The University of Melbourne. In 2006 Mikala completed her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) at the University of Melbourne and in early 2015 submitted her PhD at UNSW Art & Design examining the influence of the Global City on China’s local art infrastructure.

 

 

 

When South Is North would not be possible without the support of our project partners:

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When South is North: Contemporary Art and Culture in South Asia and Australia was a one-day symposium produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in association with the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University. Presented at 1 Parramatta Square, Western Sydney University campus, Parramatta, on 16 August 2017. The symposium was assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. Adeela Suleman’s participation in this symposium and 4A exhibition I don’t want to be there when it happens was supported by co-commissioning partner The Keir Foundation with further assistance from Sherman Foundation.

Symposium Documentation
All images: 4A’s Kai Wasikowski

 

| Prof. Paul JAMES, Western Sydney University, Director, Institute of Society and Culture

Prof. Paul JAMES, Western Sydney University, Director, Institute of Society and Culture

 

| Dr. Mikala TAI, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Dr. Mikala TAI, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

 

 Associate Professor Devleena GHOSH

Associate Professor Devleena GHOSH

 

Reena KALLAT (India)

Reena KALLAT (India)

 

Reena KALLAT (India)

Reena KALLAT (India)

 

Panel 1 – Art in, of, from, South Asia? Artists working across cultures and geographies. | Moderator: Pedro DE ALMEIDA | Speakers: Reena KALLAT (India), Ramesh Mario NITHIYENDRAN, Nusra Latif QURESHI, Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan) and Abdullah M.I SYED

Panel 1 – Art in, of, from, South Asia? Artists working across cultures and geographies. | Moderator: Pedro DE ALMEIDA | Speakers:
Reena KALLAT (India), Ramesh Mario NITHIYENDRAN, Nusra Latif QURESHI, Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan) and Abdullah M.I SYED

 

Parramatta Artist Studios visit as part of When South Is North

Marikit Santiago in her studio at Parramatta Artist Studios. Visit as part of When South Is North.

 

Parramatta Artist Studios visit as part of When South Is North

Kalanjay Dhir in his studio at Parramatta Artist Studios. Visit as part of When South Is North.

 

Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

 

Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

Vidya SHIVADAS (India)

 

Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI | Speakers: Sunil BADAMI, Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI | Speakers: Sunil BADAMI,
Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

 

Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI | Speakers: Sunil BADAMI, Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

Panel 2 – Situating South Asian arts and culture in Australia | Moderator: Dr Mehreen FARUQI | Speakers: Sunil BADAMI, 
Melanie EASTBURN, Amrit GILL, Gary PARAMANATHAN, S. SHAKTHIDHARAN

 

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Adeela SULEMAN (Pakistan)

 

 

 

 

 

DACCHI DANG: AN OMEN NEAR AND FAR

SYDNEY. 9 JUNE – 30 JULY 2017.

Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far is the first survey exhibition of one of the preeminent Vietnamese-Australian artists working today. Presenting a selection of works spanning three decades by a founding artist member of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Dacchi Dang is principally concerned with articulating the complex nature of diasporic experience and an ongoing redefinition of ideas of place and of home. With a focus on the artist’s work across photography, printmaking, video and installation, An Omen Near and Far signals the central importance of art in coming to terms with the contingencies of the past and of the present.

Born in Saigon and having experienced the latter years of the Vietnam War before fleeing his homeland on a boat to be eventually accepted as a refugee in Australia, Dacchi Dang’s life and art is deeply informed by this trauma, loss and an ongoing search for belonging. An Omen Near and Far unveils a new installation work commissioned by 4A that employs photography and wax that burns and melts over the duration of the exhibition. Informed by a recent 2017 trip to Vietnam, this new work is conceptually connected to an earlier, ephemeral sculpture and performance originally staged as Upstairs/downstairs at Sydney’s National Art School in 1994. This latter work – ghostly documentation of which is included in the survey – saw Dang burn a wax sculpture imprinted with photographic imagery recorded by the artist in Vietnam in that same year, his first visit to his country of birth since arriving in Australia in 1982.

Dacchi Dang’s dislocating experience of returning to Cholon, Saigon’s Chinese district and where he grew up, and extended family members in Bến Tre province in the Mekong Delta, prompted him to photograph the people and landscapes of Vietnam voraciously. Having shot over 100 rolls of black-and-white film on his Hasselblad, Dang’s photographic archive of daily life in urban and rural Vietnam documents a time concurrent with the momentous historic occasion of the lifting of the trade embargo between the U.S. and the Republic of Vietnam that had been in place since the end of military conflict in 1975. Dang’s source imagery – now a time capsule of the developing nation in flux– resulted in a highly productive period of experimentation. Spectacle I (1996) and Spectacle II (1996), a suite of monochromatic photogravure prints and their corresponding gold plates, present intimate portraits of ordinary Vietnamese and montaged street scenes tempered by an uneasy balance between empathy and distance.

In addition to series of works over the past decades that explore landscapes as colonised and contested forms of cultural memory, from Paris to Peel Island in Queensland’s Moreton Bay, An Omen Near and Far offers a selection of historical material from the archives of both the artist and 4A: photographic proof sheets, exhibition ephemera, reviews, interviews and critical texts. This includes documentation of Dang’s seminal solo exhibition, The Boat, presented at 4A in 2001, a milestone in the development of wider public reception and understanding of art from Asian-Australian perspectives. The Boat garnered strong community responses, opening up dialogue by addressing the profound perils of seeking asylum while prompting a critical consideration of Australia’s changing treatment of refugees.

Accompanying the exhibition, 4A will host a panel discussion that will offer insights into the historical research and creative development currently being undertaken by Dacchi Dang for the Australian War Memorial’s Gillespie Bequest commission of a new body of work due for completion over 2017–2018. Exploring the experiences of Australian and Vietnamese–Australians military veterans of the Vietnam War, and engaging with the Memorial’s extensive collection and archives, Dang’s commission represents the first such instance to form part of the national institution’s art collection.

 

logoblock_dacchi_2017


Dacchi Dang
 (b. Saigon, Vietnam, 1966) is an artist who lives and works in Sydney. He is a founding artist member of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dang was born to a Chinese father and Vietnamese mother, and at the age of sixteen fled Vietnam with his brother and sister on a fishing boat. After a traumatic sea voyage the boat arrived on Malaysian shores where Dang was transported to the refugee camp of Pulau Bidong. Following nine months at the camp, he was transported to Kuala Lumpur where he was accepted as a Vietnamese refugee by Australia in late 1982.

Dacchi Dang works primarily with photography and printmaking, in various forms and processes, and also video and installation. His work has been exhibited in Australia and internationally since the early 1990s. Solo exhibitions include Full Circle (2009), Metro Arts Gallery, Brisbane; Liminal (2006-2008), Horsham Regional Art Gallery, Victoria; Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne; and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney; Spectacle I (1996), Firstdraft Gallery, Sydney; Spectacle II, Stills Gallery, Sydney. Group exhibitions include DDESSIN [14] (2014), Paris Contemporary Drawing Fair, Atelier Richelieu; Crossing Boundaries (2014), Sydney Town Hall; Edge of Elsewhere (2010-2012), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney; Planet Ueno (2008); Taito Community Museum, Tokyo; Re-StArt (2008), 733 Art Factory, Chengdu; and News From Islands (2007), Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney.

He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (1991) and a Master of Arts (1996) from the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales, Sydney; Graduate Diploma in Archives and Records Management (2000) and Graduate Certificate of Applied Science in Cultural Heritage Studies specialising in Photography (2003) from University of Canberra; and a Doctor of Philosophy (Fine Arts) from Queensland College of the Arts, Griffith University, Brisbane (2013). Dang has undertaken numerous artist in residence programs including at Bundanon Trust (2001), Hill End (2001); Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris (2003) and Tokyo University of the Arts Geidai (2008). His work is held in public and private collections in Australia, France, China and Hong Kong. Over 2015-2018 Dang is producing new works commissioned by the Australian War Memorial Gillespie Bequest that explore the wartime experience of Vietnamese–Australians and its legacy today.


Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.
‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

Dacchi Dang, Liminal, (2005) installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Dacchi Dang, Liminal, (2005) installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Dacchi Dang: Artist book, 2001. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Dacchi Dang: Artist book, 2001, cyanotype on paper, bound with hand-stitch, 35 pages. Courtesy the artist and Bundanon Trust
collection, New South Wales.

 

Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Clockwise from left: Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996); Daachi Dang, Untitled (from the series Spectacle II) (1996). Installation view, all works courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Clockwise from left: Daachi Dang, Spectacle I, 1996, gold plates. Courtesy the artist; Daachi Dang, Untitled (from the series
Spectacle II),
1996, photogravure. Courtesy the artist and Horsham Regional Art Gallery Collection, Victoria, purchased through
the Horsham Art Gallery
Trust Fund with assistance from the Victorian Public Galleries Foundation, 1998.

 

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

Dacchi Dang, Et in Arcadia Ego, 2017, installation with wax, photographs, bamboo leaves commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

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4a-opening-june17-83

Three images above – Exhibition Opening, 9 June 2017. Performance stills: Dacchi Dang, Et in Arcadia Ego, 2017, installation
with wax, photographs, bamboo leaves, commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and assisted by the Australian
Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. Courtesy the artist.

Progress: The Game of Leaders – 4A x Melbourne Festival

OCT 4 – 15 – MPavilion as part of Melbourne Festival

Program venue:
MPavilion
Queen Victoria Gardens, St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC 3004

 

  • Progress: The Game of Leaders can be played:
    Wednesday 4 October – 9AM – 12PM
    Daily, Thursday 5 October – Sunday 15 October – 9AM – 4PM

 

Where will you be standing when the First World falls?

Like a giant round of Jenga with Western civilisation as the stakes, Progress: The Game of Leaders invites you to take on the role of building a country. What blocks will you favour: economic progress or military spending? Higher standards of living or increasing globalisation? As players jockey for top position in the imaginary nation’s guidance, the structure grows more precarious and its foundations grow ever more compromised. The game can only end one way.

Singaporean artist Sam Lo’s Progress: The Game of Leaders is a playful and interactive allegory that asks what is put in peril by the unfettered progress of the First World, and is a refreshing take on world politics for a time that sorely needs it.

Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art as part of Melbourne Festival 2017.

 

About the artist:

Sam Lo (b. 1986), also known by the moniker SKL0, is a Singaporean contemporary artist whose work is heavily inspired by daily observations and research on the sociopolitical climate from which she executes through visual commentary comprising of text and imagery. The end results birth new meanings, lent to existing situations by incorporating ideas, messages and emotions with familiar visual codes into urban situations in hopes of creating experiences to invoke critical thought on the viewer’s everyday life. 

Exhibitions include solo shows at One East Asia Gallery (Singapore, 2017) and at The Substation (Singapore, 2015), as well as showcases like The Affordable Art Fair (Singapore 2013) and Georgetown Festival (Penang, Malaysia 2014). The artist has also released a book titled ‘Greetings From Singapore‘ and recently completed a residency in Delhi with ST+Art Foundation involving The Singapore High Commission and Singapore Tourism Board.

Sam is also founder of the creative platforms Project XIV and INDIGOISM.

Familiar Stranger

SYDNEY. 7 APRIL – 21 MAY 2017.

Artists: Shumon Ahmed, Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, Bashir Makhoul, Veer Munshi, Shireen Taweel and Curtis Taylor.

The reconciliation between memory and reality plagues the act of returning. There is no resolution between the two. Memories are etched into the psyche hinged on topographical monuments, whispered words and subconscious everyday patterns while reality erases such symbology through the passing of time. Familiar Stranger examines this third, non-existent space that plagues the returnee as they seek to retrace their memories in places that have been rebuilt or reinscribed. With familiarity reduced to invisible archaeological sites the returnee searches for recognition and legitimacy in a now unacquainted geography.

The exhibiting artists examine the negation and erasure of familiarity by presenting place as a space defined by uncertainty. There is a continue shift between points of view that begets the collapse of spatial certainty and becomes defined by its own instability. For the migrant the idea of returning becomes an implicit part of their identity; the constant oscillation between the possibility and impossibility of return a daily taunt. In Familiar Stranger the moment of return is the focal point where, for some, it is a wistful hope and for others a violent decimation of expectancy. Resisting melodrama, the artists turn to the familial archive and the personal memorial to bring form to the constant internal struggle between what is and what was.

 

About the artists:

Bashir Makhoul (b. 1963, Galilee, Palestine, lives and works in Birmingham, United Kingdom) is a Palestinian artist born in Galilee in 1963. He has been based in the United Kingdom for the past 22 years. During this time he has produced a body of work, based on repeated motifs, which can be characterized by their power of aesthetic seduction. Once drawn into the work however, viewers find themselves engaged with something far more complicated than a beautiful pattern. Economics, nationalism, war and torture are frequently woven into the layers of Makhoul’s work and often the more explicit the material, the more seductive the surface.

Makhoul completed his PhD in 1995 at Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK. He has exhibited his work widely in Britain and internationally, including the Hayward Gallery, London, Tate Liverpool, Harris Museum, Preston, Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, the Liverpool Biennial, Jordan National Museum, NCA Gallery Lahore Pakistan, the Florence Biennial, Haus am Lutzowplatz Berlin, UTS Gallery, Sydney, Australia, Elga Wimmer Gallery, New York, Changshu Art Museum, Suzhou Art Museum, Shenzhen Art Museum in China, 798 Yang Gallery Beijing and many others. In 2013, he  presented his work at the Venice Biennial in Italy and Aichi Biennial in Japan. He will show at the Asian Triennial in Manchester UK in 2014.

Curtis Taylor (b. Broome, Western Australia, Australia, lives and works in Perth, Australia) is a filmmaker, screen artist, actor and a young Martu leader. Growing up in remote Martu desert communities and in the city, Curtis has both traditional Martu knowledge and a non-Aboriginal education. After finishing school in 2008 Curtis worked as Community Coordinator and Youth Development Officer at Martu Media (a division of Kanyirninpa Jukurrpa), where he also spent 18 months working on the major Yiwarra Kuju: The Canning Stock Route project as a filmmaker and youth ambassador. Curtis was the recipient of the 2011 Western Australian Youth Art Award and Wesfarmers Youth Scholarship. His screen work including the acclaimed short film ‘Mamu’ has been shown in international film festivals from Brazil to Nepal. Curtis has almost completed his film and media studies at Murdoch University. He was the Director’s Attachment and is the Narrator of ‘Collisions’.

Chun Yin Rainbow Chan ( b. 1990, Hong Kong, lives and works in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is a multidisciplinary artist who works across sound, performance and installation. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Sydney, she is interested in duality, diaspora and the effects of globalisation on modern Chinese society. Chan often evokes traditional Chinese methods or styles and represents them in uncanny ways. Her research engages with the authentic and the copy, exploring sites of exchange and desire which complicate Western notions of originality and “appropriate” consumption.

Central to Chan’s work is the circulation of knock-off objects, sounds and images in global media. Her work positions the fake as a complex sign that shapes new myths, values and contemporary commodity production. Sustained by a parasitic relationship to the original, the counterfeit interacts with the world in unpredictable ways. Chan investigates how these mimetic symbols, such as bootlegs or fake luxury goods, problematise the socially-regulated impulse of consumerist desire.

Tying together her works across installation and pop music is the relationship between nostalgia, migration and identity. Since winning FBi Radio’s Northern Lights Competition in 2011, Chan has been building a reputation as one of the most innovative artists in Australia with her highly personal, experimental pop music. She recently released her debut album Spacings (Silo Arts & Records) which was met with critical acclaim, handpicked as the feature album on FBi Radio, Radio Adelaide, RTRFM and scoring 4 stars from Rolling Stone. Under her techno project, Chunyin, Chan released Code Switch EP on UK label, Off Out, in September.

Chan has performed extensively with notable performances at the Sydney Opera House, Museum of Contemporary Art, Gallery of Modern Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales and Iceland Airwaves Festival. She has exhibited works at Firstdraft Gallery, Liquid Architecture and Squiggle Space. In October 2016, she was invited by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art to participate in the inaugural Longli International New Media Arts Festival in Guizhou Province, China. Chan has collaborated with choreographer Ivey Wawn for Out of The Studio, presented by DirtyFeet, and soundtracked ABC web-series The Glass Bedroom, directed by Kate Blackmore.

Shumon Ahmed  (b. 1977, Bangladesh, lives and works in Dhaka, Bangladesh) is a Dhaka-based poet and an artist who explores the fusion between video, photography, Sound, text and performance, creating stories that while seemingly contradictory, are private yet collective. His work with the camera and film has also been likened to abstract painting due to his experimental processing techniques with unpredictable results that yield the melancholic.

Ahmed studied photography at the South Asian Media Academy, Dhaka, Bangladesh (2006- 2009) & at The Danish school of Media and Journalism, Arhus, Denmark (2008).

His work has been previously exhibited in various galleries, festivals and screenings around the world including the 2014 Kochi-Muziris Biennale, India, Dhaka Art Summit, Bangladesh (2012, 2014, 2016), Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2010), Fotomuseum, Winterthur, Switzerland (2010), Art science museum, Singapore (2016), Krinzinger Projekete, Austria (2016) and a recent solo exhibition at Project88, Mumbai, India (2015).

In April, Shumon will take part in Familiar Stranger, a group exhibition at 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney.

Veer Munshi (b. 1955, Kashmir, India, lives and works in Dehli, India), a Kashmiri artist who now lives in Delhi has consistently used his art to reflect his anguish at the situation in his home state, his pain and struggle spilling over onto his canvass. Making a human rights statement rather than a political one, he has constantly sought to highlight the turmoil that comes  with his separation from his heritage, and to highlight the increasingly the narrow space that exists for culture and art in his state. He is also convinced that art. Because of its universal nature, can play a significant role in the resolution of the Kashmir situation. Unlike other contemporary artists, though, viewing pleasure is no motivator for veer in the creation of his art,rather it is about sharing a personally-felt experience as a ‘refugee’. His paintings and installations reflect a Kashmir that is in the context of the Kashmir.

Shireen Taweel (b. 1990, Bankstown, New South Wales, Australia, lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is currently practicing at the Parramatta Artist Studios in Sydney.  Much of Taweel’s practice is informed by her identity connected to the Middle East as her heritage further inspires her creative exploration through the refined processes in metallurgy. The nature of the relationship of her forms sit in a space between jewellery and sculpture, where her techniques of making takes the traditional art of copper-smithing into a contemporary context.

The works partake in a cross-cultural discourse, while the sense of the arcane and shifted structures opens dialogue between shared histories and relations between communities of fluid identities.

Taweel is a current Kickstart Helix Next Wave participant. Her recent solo shows include fractured//fluid terrains at SEVENTH Gallery, Melbourne (2017), translated roots at Verge Gallery, Sydney (2017) tomorrow, InshAllah at 55 Sydenham RD Marrickville, Sydney (2016) rhythms of the ritualistic at Gaffa Gallery, Sydney (2016) and promised denial at 146 ArtSpace, Hobart (2016).  Taweel is also a nominee of The Jameel Art Prize (2018) at Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

 

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

 

Left: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Bashir Makhoul, Wounds, 2007 – 2008, lenticular print,
400 x 200cm. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography. Right: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian
Art: Veer Munshi, Leaves like hands of flame, 2010 – 2012, two channel video, 5: 32. Courtesy the artist and Latitude 28, New
Delhi, India.


Left: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shumon Ahmed, What I have forgotten could fill an ocean,
what is not real never lived, 2013, polaroid photographs, analogue phone set, original sarod score composed by Yusuf Khan and
poetry recited by Nader Salam, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist, Samdani Art Foundation, Dhaka, Bangladesh &
Project88, Mumbai, India. Image: Document Photography Right: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:
Bashir Makhoul, Wounds, 2007 – 2008, lenticular print, 400 x 200cm. Courtesy the artist.


Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shumon Ahmed, What I have forgotten could fill an ocean, what is
not real never lived, 2013, polaroid photographs, analogue phone set, original sarod score composed by Yusuf Khan and poetry
recited by Nader Salam, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist, Samdani Art Foundation, Dhaka, Bangladesh & Project88,
Mumbai, India.


Right: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shireen Taweel, Al Nahas, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm.
Courtesy the artist. Shireen Taweel, Al Nahas, 2015, etched copper, 100 x 90 x 40. Courtesy the artist. Left: Installation view,
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Curtis Taylor works as below. Curtis Taylor, Karlaya, 2014, video, 23 seconds.
Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marlu, 2014, video, 42 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marrka Marrka – Mirage, 2017,
red dirt and animated projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Parnajarrpa, 2014, video, 29 seconds.
Courtesy the artist.


a4-april-web-33

Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Chun Yin Rainbow Chan (陳雋然), To enclose one’s mouth, 2017, ink,
silk, wood, video loop, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist.


Left: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Curtis Taylor works as below. Curtis Taylor, Karlaya, 2014,
video, 23 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marlu, 2014, video, 42 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marrka
Marrka – Mirage, 2017, red dirt and animated projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Parnajarrpa,
2014, video, 29 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Image, Document Photography. Right: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary
Asian Art: Shireen Taweel, Dome, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm. Courtesy the artist. Image, Document Photography. And
Shireen Taweel, Sophia, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm. Courtesy the artist.

He Xiangyu’s The Swim – Premiere Australian Screenings

SYDNEY – Free screenings: May 25 – 28 2017.

4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art is pleased to announce the Australian premiere of He Xiangyu’s latest film, The Swim

The Swim is an art film with documentary characteristics. The artist returned to his hometown in Kuandian for three times – a poor county located by Yalu River on the China-North Korea border. Through interviewing and filming 6 veterans participating in the Korean War and 6 defectors fleeing from North Korean as well as their families, the film unveils the cruel reality hidden behind the beautiful scenery and presents the utopian fantasy projected on individuals.

This will be only the second international screening of this work (after an international premiere at the Guggenheim in February 2017).

He Xiangyu is a leading contemporary artist based between Beijing and Berlin who first garnered attention for his large-scale works, such as The Coca Cola Project and Tank Project. Xiangyu is represented by White Cube and his work is in the collections of:Rubell Family Collection, Miami, USA; Kunstmuseum Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Pinault Collection, France; White Rabbit Gallery, Sydney, Australia; Domus Collection, USA; Boros Collection, Berlin, Germany; Long Museum, Shanghai, China; Mercator Foundation, Essen, Germany; Artron Art Museum, Shenzhen, China; M WOODS Museum, Beijing, China; Sishang Museum, Beijing, China.

 

Director’s Statement:

On the Tomb-sweeping Day in 2015, I went back to my hometown for ancestor worship. In China, it is a day when we mourn the deceased and wish them living a happy life in the other world. My hometown is a border town where I was born and grew up. I used to know well about the neighbours and the landscape. But after leaving for years, I found the landscape that seemed familiar and everlasting before had concealed certain strange reality now. The Utopia in my carefree childhood makes me feel complicated and ambiguous, which inspires me to rediscover the place and the people’s life there.

I spent more than half a year on field trips and collected a large amount of materials. The interviewees include a dozen North Korean defectors and over twenty veterans participating in the Korean War. Their narrations unveil the realistic face of my hometown. Following my childhood memory and local people’s narrations, I started my first filming in this April along the border between China and North Korea. Later, I went back twice. During the three filming trips, the experiences of the individual interviewees, their struggle in reality and their expectation for the future were so fascinating and touching. Although have gone through the geographical and spiritual departure and return, the land that used to be so familiar is still strange to me.

 

About He Xiangyu (b.1986, Dandong, China.Lives and works across Beijing, China and Berlin, Germany.)

He Xiangyu’s experimental practice can be seen as both a material testing ground and conceptual laboratory that investigates diverse personal, social and political themes. Part of a generation of Chinese artists who grew up during a period of rapid urbanisation, He Xiangyu is one of the most important and influential figures in contemporary Chinese art.  He has said that “I’m seeking to adjust and guide people’s perception through the material changes within the object”, using a range of media to reflect on philosophic ideas such as the increasing materialism and obsolescence of our society as well as the effects of the institutionalisation and commercialisation of contemporary art.

He Xiangyu is represented by White Cube and has an international reputation. His solo exhibitions have been presented in London, Frankfurt, Sydney, Tokyo and Beijing. His works are included in numerous group shows, including Soil and Stones, Souls and Songs by Kadist Art Foundation, the Biennale de
Lyon, Fire and Forget: On Violence in the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, 28 Chinese in the Asian Art Museum/ San Antonia Museum of Art in San Francisco and San Antonia, Shanghai Biennale, Busan Biennale and exhibitions in many important institutions in the world.

He Xiangyu’s works have been collected by the Uli Sigg Collection (Switzerland), Rubell Family Collection (Miami, USA), Kunstmuseum Bern (Bern, Switzerland), François Pinault Collection (France), White Rabbit Gallery (Sydney, Australia), Domus Collection (New York, USA), Boros Collection (Berlin, Germany), Long Museum (Shanghai, China), Stiftung Mercator (Essen, Germany), M Woods Gallery (Beijing, China) and the Si Shang Art Museum (Beijing, China).

 

This is the second time 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art has presented He Xiangyu in Sydney. The Swim follows the 2012 exhibition of the Cola Project – where the artist worked with factory workers to boil thousands of litres of Cola, creating a black sludge which He used to create Song dynasty style ink paintings.

For more information about the Cola Project, click here.

Image: The Swim (2017) (still) © He Xiangyu. Courtesy the artist and White Cube.

Before the Rain

SYDNEY. 21 JANUARY – 19 MARCH 2017.

Luke Ching, Liu Ding, Yuan Goang-Ming, James Kong, Tang Kwok Hin, Sarah Lai, Swing Lam, Ellen Pau and Sampson Wong.

Before the onset of a downpour there is a moment of heavy humidity that hangs low in the air. Building over time it signals the inevitability of a deluge that will interrupt and intercept patterns of normality. For Hong Kong, a city defined by humidity, the deluge that began on September 28 2014 was the result of a long and steady buildup of uncertainty, anxiety and the long held need to articulate a cohesive identity for the city.  Before the Rain addresses the tensions that precipitated the recent political and civil urgency in Hong Kong and the city’s pressing need to reimagine its future.

The exhibiting artists frame the conversation from a multiplicity of perspectives presenting the complexity and concerns of a city facing a future planned by others. They approach the city with an intent to protect it; their works may appear as warnings but they are underpinned by a need to safeguard.  Commissioned for the exhibition is a new work by Sampson Wong that transforms the entrance gallery into a narration of the Umbrella Movement. Ephemera taken from the streets, continuous loops of CCTV and news footage, blogs, tweets and newspapers will populate the gallery inviting the viewer to sift through the materials and navigate their own opinion of a city in flux. Before the Rain responds to a continuously evolving discourse, proving to be one of the most critical events in South East Asia’s recent history.

 


About the artists:

Luke Ching Chin-wai (b.1972, Hong Kong; lives in Hong Kong) is an inter-disciplinary artist creating multimedia installations in which traditional and new media coexist in an imperfect balance. His work identifies and attempts to deconstruct the changer urban landscapes of his home city as emblematic of Hong Kong’s pluralist history as one location caught between the eastern and western hemispheres. Ching has held a number of solo exhibitions including Screensaver (2014), Gallery EXIT, Hong Kong; as park of the Folk Art Series (2008), Blackburn Museum & Art Gallery, Blackburn, England; and 2 in 1 (2007), Hong Kong Visual Art Centre, Hong Kong. He has participated in group exhibitions not limited to Ceramics Show by Non-ceramics Artist (2015), 1a space, Hong Kong; The Invisible Hand: Curating as Gesture (2014), CAFAM Biennage, Beijing, China; The Problem of Asia (2010), Chalk Horse, Sydney; and the Hong Kong Art Biennial Exhibition 2005 (2005), Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong. Since completing his Master of Fine Art in 1998 at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Luke Ching has received awards both in Hong Kong and abroad while undertaking residencies internationally in the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Japan.

James Kong (b. 1985, Hong Kong; Lives and works in Hong Kong) graduated with a Bachelor of Science at the School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong. Since then, as an Interactive Media Engineer he dedicates his creative work to explore human-computer interaction and the application of multimedia techniques to theatrical environments. He also explores the possibilities of computational media in the arts. James has exhibitied at Exim Macau (2015) and the IFVA awards new media exhibition (2014).

Sarah Lai Cheuk Wah (b. 1983, Hong Kong; lives in Hong Kong) is a painter concerned with beautifying and capturing the aura of the mundane. Her subjects are often highly familiar objects or environments detached from the humdrum of everyday life, deprived of their utilitarian functions, allowing the artist to subtly abstract the concepts of form and function as relics of contemporary commodity culture. A recent Master of Fine Arts graduate from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Lai has consistently held solo exhibitions in Hong Kong including Unsettled Heart (2016), The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Kong Kong; In Stasis (2015), Art Basel Hong Kong, Para Site, Hong Kong; and Safety Island (2013), Gallery EXIT, Hong Kong. Her works are collected internationally after participating in group exhibitions internationally, such as The 2nd CAFAM Future Exhibition (2015), CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China; I submit to the wisdom of the body (2015), Silverlens Gallery, Manila, Philippines; The Hong Kong International Art Fair (2013), Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Hong Kong; and the Sovereign Art Prize (2010), ARTSPACE at Helutrans, Singapore.

Ellen Pau (b. Hong Kong; lives in Hong Kong) made her first super-8 film in 1984. Being a self-taught artist, she worked as a MTV director, cinematographer, video artist, curator, educator and arts administrator. Pau started her international career in 1995 at the Kwangiu Biennale in Korea, curated by Kim Hon-Yee and Nam-June Paik. She is the co-founder and artistic director for the media art organisation Videotage, and a member and curator of the organizing committee for the Microwave International Media Art Festival, Hong Kong since 1996. A radiographer by profession, Pau teaches part-time in Hong Kong University, Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts, as well as being a full time medical image technologist. Pau is advisor to the HK Museum of Art, the HK Art Development Council and a number of festivals.

Sampson Wong (b. 1985, Hong Kong; lives in Hong Kong) is an artist, independent curator, academic and urbanist from Hong Kong. He engages in art-making, curatorial practice, teaching, research and writing, and see them as intellectual means exploring issues about urbanism, space, power and freedom. His research interests also include politics of epidemics and Hong Kong studies. He is now writing books about plagues in Hong Kong, urbanism and art, and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement. His writings often appear in the Stand News and Mingpao (Sunday Life). Recent projects in 2016 include From 60 seconds to 2047, Countdown Machine and Land Visions: In Search of Land Art in Hong Kong. He also curated 2nd emptyscape art festival: Beyond the Village School 2016, Studio in-Situ – Assembling! 2016, and Affordable Art Basel! In 2015. He received his Ph.D in Urban Studies & Geography at the University of Manchester in 2014.

Yuan Goang-Ming (b. 1965, Taipei, Taiwan; lives in Taipei) is one of the foremost Taiwanese artists of media art, and has been a pioneer of video art in Taiwan, a medium in which he started working in 1986. In 1997, he received a Master’s degree in media art from the Academy of Design, Karlsruhe. Combining symbolic metaphors with technological media, his work eloquently expresses the state of contemporary existence and profoundly explores the human mind and consciousness. Yuan has been the recipient of many awards, including the Jury Prize of the first Art Future 2000 by the Acer Digital Art Center. His works, ranging from photographs to multi-media installations, have been exhibited worldwide, including at the Taiwan Pavilion at the 50th Venice Biennale (2003). Recent solo exhibitions include BEFORE MEMORY (2011, TKG+, Taipei), and DISAPEARINGTRACES (2011, TKG+, Beijing).

Swing Lam (b.1986, Hong Kong) specialises in various art forms, including painting, performance art, temporary architecture research and is involved in cultural and urban sketching studies. He writes arts and cultural columns for Ming Pao and Stand News amongst others. He earned a bachelor degree of Visual Arts in HKBU and a MA intercultural studies in CUHK and is one of the fotanian artists concentrated on drawing, painting and happenings. Swing started the project Flaneur 11 on 2012 spring; a project of waking across 10 cities over the world. Swing showed his project in Atelier Muji gallery as his first solo exhibition in spring 2013. RTHK also made a documentary of his work in January 2013. In 2014, he developed a facebook page to introduce and study some of the featured architecture, tools and creations found. It helped the public look into the temporary facilities from an artistic point of view. In the project Swing embraced his experience of walking through cities and his interaction with the public in this public space. Currently, Swing is working as a Lecturer in Lingnan University Community college for Art and design courses.

 

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

 

Before the Rain installation view 1

Centre: Umbrella Movement (2017), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the
artist. Image: Document Photography. 
Walls: Swing LamTemporary structure research in Umbrella Revolution 2014-2016 (2016),
installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, works on paper. Courtesy the artist.

 

4a_jan_media-7

Swing Lam, Temporary structure research in Umbrella Revolution 2014-2016 (2016), works on paper. Installation view, detail.
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Before the Rain installation view 2

Clockwise from left: Ellen Pau, Diverson (1990), single-channel video, 5:30. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian
Art. Liu Ding, A Sentence, (2016), poem, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Sarah Lai, Rub it until it is removed
(2015) single-channel HD video, 5:40, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Sarah Lai, Polish your own shoe
as long as you can
 (2015), single-channel HD video, 11:11, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Sarah Lai,
Demarcated area (2017), performance with installation. Dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary
Asian Art. Luke Ching, 150 Lost Items (2014), mixed media, installation view. All courtesy the artists.

 

Before the Rain installation view 3

Luke Ching, 150 Lost Items (2014), mixed media, detail installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Before the Rain installation view 7

Left: Yuan Goang-MingThe 561st Hour of Occupation (2014), installation view, single-channel video. Courtesy the artist.
Right: Reproduced items and image from The Umbrella Movement Visual Archive, (2014), installation view, 4A Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art.

 

Before the Rain installation view 8

Reproduction items and image from The Umbrella Movement Visual Archive, (2014), installation view (detail), 4A Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the Umbrella Movement Visual Archive.

 

Before the Rain installation view 4

Real and reproduced protest posters from The Umbrella Movement Visual Archive, (2014), installation view, detail, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the Umbrella Movement Visual Archive.

 

Before the Rain installation view 5

Sampson WongCapturing a hyperevent: artistic records of the Umbrella Movement (2017), installation view, detail, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist.

Rhyme and Reason

16 October – 8 November 1997

Curator: Felicia Kan
Artists: Stephen Bambury, Vicente Butron, Marco Fusinato, Melinda Harper, Felicia Kan and Susan Norrie.


Exhibition documentation

rhymereason_installation_4

L-R: Susan Norrie, Violent Grey, 1997, oil on wood, glass frame, oil on canvas. Courtesy of Mori Gallery, Sydney. Vicente Butron, Yellow Painting, Done With A Modicum of Love (from s-l-s) no. 162, 1997, graphite and acrylic on aluminium. Felicia Kan, Liberty and Equality (Black/White), 1997, 2 panels, oil on canvas. Courtesy of Mori Gallery, Sydney. Melinda Harper, untitled, 1996, oil on canvas. Courtesy of David Pestorius Gallery, Brisbane.

Victoria Lobregat: An Endlessly Reflective Net of Jewels

12 July – 2 August 1997

Victoria Lobregat (b. Manila, Philippines)

An Endlessly Reflective Net of Jewels was Victoria Lobregat’s exhibition of new paintings, a series of small canvas boards arranged into discrete grids formed an unusual narrative with fragments from everyday life and symbols of different cultures.

Having worked as an illustrator and designer for Hot Tuna, Lobregat is familiar with the power of the symbol. Employing an idiosyncratic logic she pairs the spiritual with consumer desire – Lobregat combines motifs from a variety of sources ranging from Buddhist prayer symbols to logos from surf brands.

Dacchi Dang: 5 x 5

6 June – 5 July 1997

Artist Statement:

5×5 is a series of black and white silver gelatine prints about my journey and exploration of the Vietnam landscape.

During the war, it was very difficult for many Vietnamese to explore the country because of the heavy fighting in the country. After the war ended, South Vietnam was effected badly from the social and economic cause of the North Communist government. My family like many other families had to work hard to earn some money for living and did not have much time for leisure. Not until my return in 1995, I had an opportunity to explore the country landscape for the first time.

These landscapes have given me a deep impression. City and country life styles always have a big difference between them. The city have a polluted environment because from the noise of the transport, people or new development. In contrast, when I was in the country, I had the feeling of walking back in time. The life style was more simple than city life. My interest is to capture this beautiful tranquility, and relate this experience through the image. It is soft and misty, light falling gently to the land, and bursting out of a peaceful and calm atmosphere that is hard to forget.

Elizabeth Pulie + Savanhdary Vongpoothorn

10 April – 3 May 1997

If art production is thought of in a Freudian sense as being an act of compulsion then the joint exhibition of Elizabeth Pulie and Savanhdary Vongpoothorn at Sydney’s Gallery 4A must have been the result of the respective obsessive-compulsive conditions. Each artist presented four works created via manically repeated actions: intricate beading in the case of Pulie and multiple pointillist-style needle pricks in the case of Vongpoothorn.

Pulie’s and Vongpoothorn’s exhibition was the second to be held at the recently opened Gallery 4A in Sydney’s Chinatown.

Inaugural Exhibition

4A’s first ever exhibition.

Exhibiting artists: Emil Goh, Lindy Lee, Hou Leong

 

http://www.4a.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Installation_shot_2_1997.jpg

Clockwise from left: Emil Goh, The Bride (The Last Nonya), 1996, type C print. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Emil Goh, The Wedding (The Last Nonya), 1996, type C print. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Lindy LeeBirds of Appetite, 1996, wax and synthetic polymer paint on board. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

http://www.4a.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Installation_shot_3_1997.jpg

Left: Hou Leong, An Australian: Cricket Hero, 1994, digital colour photograph. Installation view, detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney.
Right: Lindy Lee, Birds of Appetite, 1996, wax and synthetic polymer paint on board. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

Inaugural exhibition_hou_leong_1994_autobiography_with_chairman_mao_digital_photography

Hou Leong, Autobiography: With Chairman Mao, 1994, digital photograph. Courtesy the artist and Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney.
Header Image: Clockwise from left: Lindy LeeBirds of Appetite, 1996, wax and synthetic polymer paint on board. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney. Emil Goh, The Wedding (The Last Nonya), 1996, type C print. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Emil Goh, The Bride (The Last Nonya), 1996, type C print. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. 

Prima Donna

ruth_watson_1998_take_heart_total_dimension_1600mm2_chocolate_wrapping_paper_silicone_pins_in_prima_donna_sept_1998_gallery_4a_2
3  – 19 September 1998

Curator: Benjamin Genocchio
Artists: Yenda Carson, Megan Marshall, Ruth Watson and Justene Williams.

Prima Donna offers a playful parody of Primavera, the annual showcase of young contemporary artists at the Museum of Contemporary Art.

The work of the four artists included in the exhibition relates to the title in another way. Their work is grounded in the trivial events and mundane concerns of everyday life, yet produced with a sense of verve and spunk that is very much out of the ordinary.

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Ruth Watson, Take Heart (detail), 1998, chocolate wrapping paper, silicone, pins, 160 x 160 cm. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

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Ruth Watson, Take Heart (detail), 1998, chocolate wrapping paper, silicone, pins, 160 x 160 cm. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

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Ruth Watson, Take Heart (detail), 1998, chocolate wrapping paper, silicone, pins, 160 x 160 cm. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
Header Image: Ruth Watson, Take Heart (detail), 1998, chocolate wrapping paper, silicone, pins, 160 x 160 cm. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Pasifika

Canberra Contemporary Art Space, Canberra, ACT: 28 February – 22 March 1998
Sydney: 23 July – 8 August 1998

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Jacqueline Fraser, Ani O’Neill, Kelly Thompson and Yuk King Tan

Pasifika brings together the work of four artists who currently live and work in New Zealand. Yet Pasifika is not simply an exhibition of ‘New Zealand’ art. This exhibition explores the way in which four artists, from diverse cultural backgrounds, draw upon cultural practices using the formal idioms of international contemporary art. The work of the artists included in the exhibition can thus be located within a specific cultural context (New Zealand), but it cannot be reduced to or entirely explained by it.

Suzann Victor: Waiting Room

11 June – 27 June 1998

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Part of the Signs and Wonders project.
Catalogue available in the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art library.

Suzann Victor’s (b. 1959, Singapore) work Waiting Room conjures up ideas of enclosure and theatricality. Consisted with previous works, her installation uses the body as a frame of reference. The walls are painted blood-red, over which delicate glass tears are attached in clusters. Bombarding the senses, the overall effect is disorientating, the space resembling a cavernous interior body while the tears are like escaping fluids.

Juliana Wong: Virtual Technology

2 July – 18 July 1998.

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Part of the Signs and Wonders project.
Catalogue available in the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art library.

Juliana Wong (b. 1974, Hong Kong) is a Canberra-based artist. Her ambitious installation comprises of hundreds of LED lights forming a complex web of lights within the gallery space. The constant flickering of these tiny red lights combine to form arbitrary patterns and words. This work represents a technologically responsive painting.

Showcase

14 May – 6 June 1998

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Dominic Garcia, Pornprasert Khanthawichai, Laura Lee, Natsuho Takita

Showcase is an exhibition of four young Sydney artists who graduated from art school not more than five years ago. These artists were all born elsewhere, namely Thailand, China, Philippines and Japan. Their inclusion of elements from their respective backgrounds offers a distinctly fresh perspective towards materials and everyday life.

Anne Zahalka: Woven Threads: Picturing Tribal Women in Mindanao

5 March – 21 March, 1998

Woven Threads: Picturing Tribal Women in Mindanao is a project which consists of an exhibition of photographic works about two indigenous communities, the T’boli and Manobo people who live on the island of Mindanao in the Philippines.

This body of work investigates specifically the place of women within its community. The photographs explore these via the traditional and contemporary rituals performed by women in daily life. The images were gathered during a ten day field trip and use both documentary and formal modes to address this subject.

4A Members’ Exhibition 1999

5 – 18 December 1999

Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] is pleased to announce our Members Annual Open Exhibition, the final exhibition of the year.

Over seventy members and friends of the Asian Australian Artists Association inc. have contributed work to the show at Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art], to celebrate a successful 1999. The exhibition will be opened on Saturday 5 December at 6pm by Chinese Community leader King Fong.

Different Worlds

15 September – 9 October 1999

Artists: My Le Thi and Ruth Watson

Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] is pleased to present two artists whose work addresses a sense of place – a sense of where we are in the world, as part of Australian Perspecta 1999.

Ruth Watson’s work attempt to re-position Australia and New Zealand, where she was born, from their marginal place within the discourse of cartography. Featured in the exhibition, Interrupting the World (1999), for instance, is a light-coloured carpet stained with red wine, resembling the aftermath of a party. Although the spontaneity of the spills resemble the ambiguous blobs of a Rorschach image, they also represent a view of the globe.

My Le Thi’s work focuses on an exploration of racial politics through physical signifiers such as hair, eye and skin colour. Her controversial work from 1997 consisted of a series of small heads cast in the likeness of Pauline Hanson, each painted a different colour in red, black, yellow and white, representing different racial groups. This work was a critique of racial stereotypes embodied in the political agenda of the One Nation party.

Thi’s installation for this exhibition is titled Transformation (1999), and involves members from the Sydney Vietnamese community, whose shoes or casts of their own feet are featured alongside Thi’s in the show. Thi considers shoes to be an idiosyncratic symbol of journey and life experience and, by including shoes made by others, aims to present a cacophony of different stories of migration from Vietnam to Australia.

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Ruth Watson, D.I.Y. World #1, 1999, mixed media on linen, pins, 240 x 240 cm. Installation View, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Image Courtesy the artist.
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Ruth Watson, Experimental Contact, 1999, wallpaper, contact, map pins, dimensions variable. Installation View, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Image Courtesy the artist.
Header Image: Ruth Watson, Exhibition ‘Different Worlds’ 1999, Installation View, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Image Courtesy the artist.

Poonkhin Khut: Pillow Songs and Di Wu: The Door of Silence

10 November – 4 December 1999

Pillow Songs is a powerful digital sound installation that plays with the tensions between sound and silence, tactility and memory, intimate domestic rituals and public space. Inspired by the suggestive stains left on old pillow casings, Poonkhin Khut transforms the gallery space into a shadowy underworld of atmospheres and aural fragments. Speakers buried inside pillows on three beds combine sounds and textures from a bank of CD players.

Di Wu’s paintings and drawings are a fusion of Tibetan Buddhist concerns and contemporary Western sensibility. His small-scale, meditative works incorporate images of mandalas and windows or doorways. They evoke rites of passage and allude to states of consciousness between life and death, or one world and the next.

Biomorphs and Katherine Huang: News From Island

13 October – 6 November 1999

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Assistant Curator/Curator, Biomorphs: Tiffany Lee-Shoy
Arists, Biomorphs: Dong Wang Fan, Leonie Watson, Manuel Sharrad and Tammy Wong

Biomorphs is an exhibition which explored the interfaced between the ‘natural’ human body and machines and technology.

Katherine Huang uses everyday materials but instead of leaving these as blank issues of daily detritus, she imbues the mystery of alchemy into each installation. In her exhibition News From Island, ordinary objects take on the poetry of the middle ages; each piece an important part of a bigger and more complicated equation. Using drawings, appropriated stationery and other found objects, Huang’s work weaves a narrative from which many stories can be drawn out and pursued within the installation’s own logic.

Paul Bai: New Chinese Paintings and Moko Halford: Packaged Memories

18 August – 11 September 1999

Paul Bai’s exhibition New Chinese Paintings is a continuation of his research into the way Chinese culture is often presented in Australia – as exotic and mysterious. Stereotypes Chinese icons and cultural cliches appear in Bai’s works. He employs social realist and satirical strategies to produce a parody of a cultural parody, such as in the work I Like Your Country Too. By confronting the colonial cultural perspective, Bai reveals the often superficial nature of cultural interpretation, and the limitations of current understandings of Chinese culture in Australian society.

Moko Halford’s installation is both and exploration into her own hybrid identity and a personal tribute to her late father. Halford has created images of her family by injecting agar-agar jelly into sheets of bubble-wrapped packaging. This method creates the effect of pixillated drawing. Halford’s use of agar-agar suggests the transition from one cultural environment (Japan) to another (Australia). Her use of packaging materials also alludes to the way in which she keeps in contact with her family – by sending packages through the post.

Bilingual: Six Translations

14 July – 14 August 1999

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Assistant Curator: Tiffany Lee-Shoy
Artists: Ah Xian, Maria Cruz, Laurens Tan, Hanh Ngo, Juliana Wong and Hyun-Ju Lee
Bilingual: Six Translations catalogue is available in the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art library.

Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] is pleased to announce Bilingual, an exhibition that brings together six Asian Australian artists whose work focuses on different themes of translation. This exhibition features work by Maria Cruz, Laurens Tan, Hyun-Ju Lee, Juliana Wong, Hanh Ngo and Ah Xian.

The idea of translation manifests itself in the work of these artists in a number of different ways, either through the translation between different cultures or translation between otherwise fixed mediums or technology.

Bilingual shows a diversity of practices by different generations of artists and work from a range of disciplines such as painting (Maria Cruz and Hyun-Ju Lee), craft-based practices (Ah Xian and Hanh Ngo) as well as computer imaging or new technology (Laurens Tan and Juliana Wong).

Neha Choksi and Nell: Nell Nation/Party Streamers and Stephen Birch: Civic Minded

16 June – 10 July 1999

Prompted by the rise of the One Nation Party, Neha Choksi and Nell are collaborating on an installation that transforms the gallery space into their own Nation. The exhibition, Nell Nation/Party Streamers, explodes the propaganda symbols of a patriotic-society-gone-mad, whilst meditating on the personal victories of organised self-reliance. The artists describe their Nation as an ‘optimistic hand-made ploy for Utopia,’ with colourful flags proclaiming ownership of the Self, and party streamers celebrating a global consciousness.

Stephen Birch’s exhibition Civic Minded continues his witty and compelling explorations into the status of the human body in social and psychological space. Birch’s installation features a pair of floor-to-ceiling fibreglass sculpted trees. The tree forms are comfortable and familiar, and yet simultaneously bizarre for they are each equipped with a pair of human feet. As they face each other in deep conversation, their strange bodily rigidness and the promise of mobility collide.

Debra Porch and Harriet Parsons: Stitching in Time and Victoria Lobregat: A Positive Era of Change

19 May – 12 June 1999

Debra Porch and Harriet Parsons investigate aspects of mortality, using strands of hair to represent traces of their own existence. Parsons’  exquisite insect embroideries are created with her own hair, stitched painstakingly into satin squares, and stretched onto embroidery hoops. Resembling scientific specimens, the works are infused with the investment of time – time taken for her to stitch, to analyse and to investigate the insect captured and frozen in time.

Victoria Lobregat is commenting on our age of change. Continuing her investigation into the power of the symbol, Lobregat juxtaposes images of sacred symbols and the everyday motifs. The multiple signs and symbols of consumer desire, culture and spirituality represent a world of possibilities for co-existence-in-chaos, informed by Lobregat’s own bi-cultural experience (Filipino-Australian). Together, the symbols suggest the inherent presence of the spiritual in the everyday and become the focus of a contemplative memory. The symbols are reinvested with new meaning and hope to become positive indicators of change for the new millennium.

Jane Polkinghorne and Helen Hyatt-Johnston: Twilight Girls Go East!!! and Min Woo Bang: Sombre Reflections on Masters

7 April – 1 May 1999

The Twilight Girls Go East!!! is the latest collaborative project by artists Jane Polkinghorne and Helen Hyatt-Johnston. Both artists are featured in a series of photographs taking as their inspiration characters such as Bette Davis as Madame Sin and Shirley Maclaine as a geisha girl. By recreating images of Westerners dressing up as Asians, the Twilight Girls humourously and at times shockingly explore Western representations of the East in film.

Min Woo Bang, a South Korean born Sydney-based artist, presents a series of paintings based upon Western masterpieces by Caravaggio and Rembrandt. Instead of directly copying these images he paints himself into them as the main figure. This has the effect of undermining our assumptions that master paintings are Western.

Mark Hislop: Prescribe and Tan Yi Feng: In and Out

10 March – 3 April 1999

Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] presented two exhibitions by emerging Australian artists.

Mark Hislop’s work conceptually starts with the word ‘prescribe.’ It examines the relationships of medical, scientific and modernist paradigms. The word ‘prescribe’ deploys a purposeful authority, a procedural act, presupposing an intent of future action in addition to reliance on previous histories of proven effect.

Tan Yi Feng’s paintings explore themes of migration based upon his journey from China to Australia. His quirky and at times surreal paintings evoke ideas of cultural difference.

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Tan Yi Feng, In and Out no.1-13 (detail) , 1999, acrylic on canvas, 83 x 91cm each. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

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Tan Yi Feng, In and Out no. 1-13 (detail), 1999, acrylic on canvas, 83 x 91cm each. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

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Tan Yi Feng, In and Out no. 1-13 (detail), 1999, acrylic on canvas, 83 x 91cm each. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Bright and Shining

Sydney, 24 February – 6 March 1999.

Australian Embassy, Tokyo, Japan, 10 December 1999 – 27 January 2000.

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Lindy Lee, Tim Johnson, Victoria Lobregat and Natsuho Takita

The title of this exhibition evokes ideas of clarity and luminosity, but also refers to the way that each of the artists work with light. This idea is further extended by the use of light to represent a spiritual realm beyond the everyday. Victoria Lobregat’s paintings, for instance, feature Buddhist phrases painted on highly reflective, glittering surfaces; while Lindy lee’s random black brushwork over brightly coloured panels is informed by principles of Zen. Tim Johnson’s works also incorporate symbols and icons from a variety of religious and indigenous stories, floating like ethereal visions; while Natsuo Takita’s blurred and distorted images of photographs are contemplative visions of light. It is the constant oscillation and resonance of these concerns between each of the works that structures this exhibition.

 

4A Members’ Exhibition 2000

19 – 23 December 2000

Artists: Min-Woo Bang, Graeme Bannerman, Zara Collins, Leonardo Cremonese, Amanda Donohue, Cherine Fahd, Heather Fernon, Peter Fray, Emil Goh, Sue Hajdu, Ellen Hernandez, Satoru Hidaka, Glenys Jackson, Liu Yi, Victoria Lobregat, Garrie Maguire, Dani Marti, Paul McInnes, Gia Nghi Phung, Fernando Octavio Pino, Dick Quan, Vikki Quill, Eugenia Raskopoulos, Lean Im Saunders, Aaron Seeto, Mu Shunjun, Jeanette Siebols, Beverly Southcott, Xu Wang, Lachlan Warner and Ruth Watson.

 

Poisonous Targets

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26 October – 18 November 2000.

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Wong Hoy Cheong (Malaysia) and Rea
Catalogue available in the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art library.

Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] is pleased to announce an exhibition featuring Malaysian artist Wong Hoy Cheong and Australian urban Indigenous artist Rea, as the first exhibition and international project to be held at Gallery 4A’s new premises at the Corporation Building.

Poisonous Targets engages with ideas of cultural diversity and multiculturalism from two very different and culturally specific vantages, seeking to complicate and question the common understanding of the term.

Wong Hoy Cheong is one of Malaysia’s most prominent artists, whose practice involves drawing, installation and performance to explore issues central to his cultural identity. In Poisonous Targets, Wong uses botanical materials such as tomato, tobacco, coconut, papaya, tapioca and tea, which are both indigenous and introduced species to Malaysia, to create masks moulded from the faces of different ethnic groups that make up Malaysia to examine ideas of social history and migration.

Rea is a well respected Indigenous artist whose practice has consisted of photographic and digital imaging as a means of exploring her grandmother’s experience as a stolen child. There issues are important not only to her own experience of Aboriginality, but also significant to a wider understanding of the multicultural experience in Australia.

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Wong Hoy Cheong, exhibition ‘Poisonous Targets’, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.  Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, The Colonies Bite Back, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, The Colonies Bite Back, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
Header Image: Wong Hoy Cheong, exhibition ‘Poisonous Targets’, 2000, Installation viewInstallation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

The Mandala Project

18 January – 3 February 2001

Organiser: The Sydney Zen Centre
Artists: Glenys Jackson, Daniel Bogunovic, My Le Thai, Tim Johnson, Gilly Coote, Brendon Stewart, Sue Murray, Savanhdary Vongpoothorn and members of the Sydney Buddhist community

The Mandala Project is a collaborative work in progress organised by the Sydney Zen Centre bringing Zen, Chinese, Laotian, Tibetan and Vietnamese Buddhist communities together with visual artists. As the mandala gradually takes shape on the floor of the gallery, the design is covered with everyday objects such as beads, beans, rice, flowers, leaves, spices, seeds, coffee and tea. The participants in the project have individual artistic freedom to paint with and layer the colourful and aromatic materials, but in a spirit of mindfulness, will work with what has come before. Each day, as different individuals work on sections of the mandala, the design will unfold organically moment by moment.

Following Buddhist principles, the process of creation will include dissolution, making reference to the impermanence of our lives. A closing ceremony celebrating the mandala’s completeness and destruction will be held Saturday 3 February 2001, 3-6pm with a Buddhist blessing by Subhana Barzaghi, Sydney Zen Centre and guest speaker Jackie Menzies, Head Curator of Asian Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales.

The Mandala Project is an official event of the Sydney Fringe Festival, 2001.

Header image: The Mandala Project [detail], 2001, installation view

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The Mandala Project, 2001, exhibition view

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The Mandala Project, 2001, installation view

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The Mandala Project [detail], 2001, installation view

Megan Keating: Different Reds

20 July – 18 August 2001

In the age of global capitalisation and urbanisation, it no longer seems appropriate to discuss the sublime in terms of the natural world. For instance the sublime can be readily found in the spectacle of public events, such as rave parties, ticket-tape parades and political rallies. In these forums, feelings of unity, heroism and nationalism are unleashed. The conjunction of mass crowds, technology and enthusiastic fervour prescribes a response that is intrinsically caught up in the profusion of the moment. Swept up in this assembly of masses is an underlying current of tension, an uneasiness that implies potential coercion and threat.

The works in Different Reds allude to propaganda devices such as flag waving, military parades and public displays of power. The protagonists in these scenarios are toys, i.e. mass-produced, blandly generic soldiers, cowboys and fighter planes. In this context the reduced monochromatic silhouettes of the figures become nostalgic tokens that belies the innocence of childhood and impose anxiety on the performance of play. In an exhibition of jest they too become vehicles for spectacle, heroism and confrontation. Through repetition proliferation, saturated colour, paper cutting and large-scale installation based works, the objective of Different Reds is to create a sensory excess in the spirit as these public events.

Header image: Megan Keating, Something in the Air, 2001, installation view

megan-keating-different-reds-4Megan Keating, Different Reds, 2001, exhibition view

megan-keating-the-great-marchMegan Keating, The Great March, 2001, installation view

megan-keating-wheel-of-fortuneMegan Keating, Wheel of Fortune [detail], 2001, installation view

Shen Shao Min: Transplantation

23 November – 15 December 2001

Transplantation is a series of paintings by Shen Shao Min which explore the physical and cultural process of migration. The figures in Shen’s monochromatic paintings are created from the forms of flowers, with a rope which encircles and binds these bodies, symbolising the process of migration and living in a new country. The idea of tension and stress are reflected in the work, as different cultures collide, humanity is distorted.

Shen Shao Min has exhibited internationally at the National Gallery of China, Beijing; the Hong Kong University Museum; as well as in Japan and France. His work is held in the collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the National Gallery of China, Beijing.

Kate Cotching: Searching for The Golden Egg

26 October – 17 November, 2001.

The Asia-Australia Arts Centre [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] is pleased to present Searching for The Golden Egg, an exhibition by Kate Cotching, a young emerging artist from Melbourne. Exhibiting in Gallery 4A’s [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] ground floor gallery, Cotching’s exhibition features an intricately designed paper-cut which fills the shopfront gallery space as it spirals and curves around the gallery walls.

Images of discarded rubbish and construction rubble are painstakingly carved into a single piece of paper, increasing in detail as it curves and spirals into itself. Intricately are painstakingly cut, the meticulousness of this gigantic paper-cut is juxtaposed against its subject matter which appear as shadows cast onto the gallery walls. Amidst this beautifully crafted landscape which represents a space and time unable to keep up with its rapidly developing environment, a single figure scratches through the debris, she continues to rummage for things worth saving.

Edge In

ADC, SYDNEY. 2 FEBRUARY – 15 MARCH 2017.

To work from the edge in is to trace and place. For Annie Gobel working from the edge in reflects her childhood creative endeavors that always started with a thick, bold outline. Performed as an overture this line crafted a space in which she could experiment and create. Today this line has become an edge; as her work has lifted from the page and into sculpture the emboldened black edge has now become form. In this body of work Gobel presents her wearable sculptures in Sydney for the first time. Bounded by memories they appear in candy coloured enamel and invite recollections of play, of toys and of childhood adventures. It is memories such as these that have been intrinsic to Gobel’s process as she seeks to ensure that the inherent freedom of childhood remains a part of the adult everyday.

Nurfitria S. Gobel (Annie Gobel) (b.1991 Jakarta, Indonesia) is a Melbourne based Jeweller. She recently exhibited at the Japan International Enameling Show at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan, Hero Worship in Craft, Melbourne and 5×7 at Gallery Funaki, Melbourne, 2016. She participated in the show Colourfast Guaranteed with Marcos Guzman at Rubicon Ari Gallery Melbourne and sPin at Australian National Capital Artists Gallery’s 5th Annual Exhibition Of Miniature Wearable Artworks, ANCA Gallery, Canberra. Gobel had a solo show Re-Played at Dia.Lo.Gue Artspace, Jakarta, Indonesia in 2015. She completed her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Gold and Silversmithing at RMIT University, Melbourne in 2013 and was a Fresh! awards finalist at Craft Victoria, Melbourne. Gobel recently completed her Graduate Diploma in Arts and Cultural Management at Melbourne University in 2016.

Dacchi Dang: The Boat

26 October – 17 November, 2001. 

The exhibition The Boat consists of a 13 metre wooden boat, reconstructed by Dacchi Dang, built within the space of the gallery and is characteristic of the boats many Vietnamese refugees fled Vietnam on. The viewer is invited to enter into this cramped space to explore something of the experiences of Vietnamese boat refugees.

The reality of such journeys can be heard on recordings and interviews with members of the community, which accompany the exhibition. This oral history provides a potent context for the work. Whereas boat refugees were once considered victims of a devastating war, they can now be regarded as survivors of a phenomenal journey. The oral histories testify the strength and self-determination of this vibrant and dynamic community.

The Boat seeks to generate community discussion through the visual arts on the issues of migration, refugees and the identity of Vietnamese-Australians and celebrates 25 years of Vietnamese migration in Australia.

Header image: Dacchi Dang, The Boat, 2001, installation view

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Dacchi Dang, The Boat, 2001, installation view

img059Dacchi Dang, The Boat, 2001, installation view

img053Dacchi Dang, The Boat [interior], 2001, installation view

The People’s Currency

MELBOURNE. 14 – 19 FEBRUARY 2017.

The People’s Currency is a new performance work by Melbourne-based artist Eugenia Lim. The work takes its name from Renminbi (China’s currency) and explores the social impacts of globalisation on those who seek their fortunes in the factories of China – or the ‘workshop of the world’. When almost everything is now ‘Made in China’, how are we all implicated as consumers, in the labour conditions of the production line? Dressed as a gold Mao-suited ‘ambassador’, Lim will inhabit a factory printing counterfeit currency of her own design. Presiding over the printing of money, Lim will also act as floor manager to a ‘factory’ of workers. The public is invited to enter into short-term ‘employment’ on the factory floor. In exchange for basic menial work, the ‘employee’ will be remunerated in The People’s Currency. The People’s Currency turns a site in Melbourne’s CBD into ‘Renminconn’, a closed loop ‘special economic zone’. In Lim’s project, mass-production and money-printing become strategies for contemplating the human impact of the ‘long march’ of global capitalism.

Eugenia Lim (b. 1981 Melbourne, Australia) is an Australian artist of Chinese–Singaporean descent who works across video, performance and installation. Interested in how nationalism and stereotypes are formed, Lim invents personas to explore the tensions of an individual within society – the alienation and belonging in a globalised world.

Conflations between authenticity, mimicry, natural, man-made, historical and anachronistic are important to the work. To this end, Lim finds inspiration in sites and objects that are both ‘contemporary’ and ‘out of time’, embodied and virtual. Model homes, suburban sprawl, CCTV, online chat rooms, fake food, historical parks and the Australian landscape have all featured in the work. Counterpoint to these sites, Lim has performed the identities of Japanese hikikomori; a Bowie-eyed rock star; the cannibal Issei Sagawa; a suburban beautician; Miranda from Picnic at Hanging Rock and currently, a gold Mao-suited ‘Ambassador’. This dialogue between place and performance reflects the push-pull between Australian and Asian, the mono and the multi-cultural.

Lim’s work has been exhibited internationally at venues including the Tate Modern, GOMA, ACMI, HUN Gallery NY, and FACT Liverpool. She has received a number of Australia Council for the Arts grants and residencies, including a residency at the Experimental Television Centre NY and exchange at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). She is currently an artist-in-residence at Bundanon Trust. Collaboration, artistic community and the intersection between art and society informs her practice: in addition to her solo work, she co-directed the inaugural Channels: the Australian Video Art Festival, is a board member at Next Wave, the founding editor of Assemble Papers and co-founder of interdisciplinary collective Tape Projects.

 

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Performance documentation
All images: Document Photography

AsiaTOPAEugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.

 

AsiaTOPAEugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPAEugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.

 

Flying Buck Exchange

MELBOURNE. 15 – 18 FEBRUARY, 2017.

Flying Buck Exchange is a special presentation of an ongoing ‘Bucking’ performance project by Pakistani-Australian artist Abdullah M.I. Syed. Showcased over three days at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Syed’s tongue-in-cheek turn of phrase, Bucking, will see him consuming, distributing and exchanging currency, in this case, in the form of the fabled US dollar bills.

With an immediate surface playfulness underneath which lie more complex renderings of the dysfunctions of global market economies, the dissemination of power, and intrinsic neo-colonial concerns, the US dollar bill becomes a powerful instrument of addressing the micro and the macro. Where the body of the artist is in immediate play, occupied in acts of repetition and endurance, so too is the larger body of the audience, which becomes as an unwitting beneficiary of this seemingly innocuous act of engagement. Innocence and familiarity are tropes that draw those present into the field of action, however the medium itself and the progression of the performance into a more sombre and painful reality rapidly bring darker concerns hurtling to the forefront.

Flying Buck Exchange is a fascinating and at times confronting look at the central role that currency plays in economies of consumption and exchange and how money often navigates cultural and political identities.

Artist Bio:

Dr. Abdullah M.I. Syed (b. 1974, Karachi Pakistan) is a contemporary artist and designer working between Sydney, Karachi and New York. Trained in diverse disciplines, his art practice weaves religious, cultural and socio-political narratives of east and west, seamlessly knitting together art historical references and concerns from each. Syed holds a PhD in Art, Media and Design (2016) and a Master of Fine Arts (2009) from University of New South Wales, Sydney. Syed’s works have been featured in nine solo exhibitions and several national and international curated group exhibitions.

 

Documentation:
All images: Document Photography

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

Performance X 4A at Art Central.

HONG KONG. 20 – 25 MARCH 2017.

Venue: Art Central Hong Kong, 9 Lung Wo Road, Central, Hong Kong.

Image by Tania Palmier Gherardi courtesy of Anida Yeou Ali.

4A returns to Art Central Hong Kong with a performance program with a series of diverse and compelling works. These leading performance artists are all working to question and challenge expectations of the norm – they ask you to imagine yourself in a different form, challenge you to rethink your expectations and invite you to speculate on a spectacle. Through the six days of the fair these artists will perform new iterations of some of their most lauded works. Tobais Gutmann’s face-o-mat returns to Asia after adventures in Papua New Guinea and Japan to refigure and redesign your face, Anida Yeou Ali’s Red Chador will weave through the crowds alongside you as you browse the booths and Hahan will invite you to hack the art market. Premiering at Art Central will be new performance works from Enoch Cheng (HK) and Amrita Hepi (AUS).

Works that will be presented as part of Performance x 4A at Art Central are:

  • Enoch Cheng – Fair Gestures/ 動靜不失其時
  • Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan – Speculative Entertainment No.1 Hong Kong Edition
  • Tobias Gutmann – Face-o-Mat
  • Amrita Hepi –This ______________ may not protect you but at times its enough to know it exists.
  • Anida Yoeu Ali – The Red Chador – Ban Me!

Biographies

Enoch Cheng (1983, Hong Kong.) lives and works in Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Enoch Cheng is an artist, director, performer, writer, independent curator, and founder of art collective Interlocutor.  His practice involves the moving image, installation, curating, dance, music events, theatre and performance. Concerned with the everyday subtleties in contemporary urban lives, his works explore recurrent themes of place, travel, fiction, memory, time and destination. He received his MA in Creative Writing from Goldsmiths, London and BA in English Literature and Art History at the University of Hong Kong. His most recent shows in Hong Kong include You Are Not Alone at Oi! Oil Street Art Space and The Memory of Proximity at Hong Kong Museum of Art.

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan (1983, Kebumen, Indonesia) lives and works in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. 
Hahan’s art making is concerned with the tussle between ‘high art’ and ‘low art’, blurring realism with decoration. Hahan incorporates film, music and street culture into a distinct visual language, creating a sense of movement and spontaneity in what can be described as a topsy-turvy reality steeped in satirical humor. In recent years, he attempts to display an art with the concept that emphasizes on the interaction with the visitors and relate it with the development of art in global as well as its society. He also one of the founders of Ace House Collective, a young artists’ collective and initiative space based in Yogyakarta which trying to capture the culture of Indonesian contemporary society through multidiscipline work process, collaboration, and research.His works have been collected by several art museum including Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) Brisbane, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Melbourne, Australia.

Tobias Gutmann (1987, Wewak, Papua New Guinea) lives and works in Zurich, Sweden. At the heart of Tobias Gutmann’s artistic practice lies the creation and investigation of encounters – between people, cultures, and environments, but also between what we perceive on the outside and what we feel on the inside. The Swiss artist aims to set up situations where such a dialogue can happen. His works morph between performance, installation, and workshops, and often have relational and participatory aspects to them. His Face-O-Mat, analogue portrait machine, has been traveling the world since 2012 and will feature at Art Central 2017. It can be viewed as a quiet critique of how technology has made us obsessed with assembling and portraying an identity that puts us in the best light. Previous Face-O-Mat projects include: Museum Haus Konstrktiv, Zurich, Switzerland, Supergraph, Melbourne, Australia and Mudam, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg.

Amrita Hepi (1989, Townsville, Australia) lives and works in New South Wales, Australia. Amrita Hepi is a Bundjulung and Ngapuhi dancer and choreographer working in the field of experimental dance. Her choreography is rooted in creating movement in transitional spaces, interweaving her urgent cultural heritage and contemporary dance training. The barriers of intersectionality, cultural memory and pop cultural references also feature in her work. Amrita has trained at the National Aboriginal Islander Skills Development Association (NAISDA) dance college, New South Wales, Australia and Alvin Ailey American Dance School, New York. She has exhibited and performed at Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Next Wave Festival, Melbourne, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia, the Australian Centre for Contemporary art, Melbourne, Carriageworks, Sydney, TEDX, Sydney and Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada.

Anida Yoeu Ali (1974, Battambang, Cambodia) lives in Seattle, Washington, United States of America and works between the Asia-Pacific and US. Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s multi-disciplinary practices include performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. She is a first generation Muslim Khmer woman born in Cambodia and raised in Chicago. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. Ali’s works have been exhibited widely in including installations and performances at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8.  In 2014, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. in from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington Bothell where she teaches art, performance and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma, Washington and spends much of her time traveling and working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US.

 

Mohini Chandra: Travels in a New World

21 September – 20 October, 2001

Mohini Chandra is a Fijian-Indian artist currently based in London. Travels in a New World consists of an installation of 100 photographs and work on video. The black and white images are of the ‘backs’ of photographs collected from communities of the Fijian-Indian diaspora scattered throughout the world. In her video work, Chandra uses the photo album as a means to revisit the past, evoking images from childhood and half-remembered generations.

Mohini Chandra has shown internationally including Bluecoat Gallery, Liverpool UK, Kampnagel Art Gallery Hamburg, Johannesburg Biennale and Courtauld Institute London. This is her first solo exhibition in Australia.

 

I don’t want to be there when it happens

SYDNEY. 18 AUGUST – 8 OCTOBER 2017.

Raj Kumar, Sonia Leber & David Chesworth and Adeela Suleman.

I don’t want to be there when it happens brings together artists who explore the psychology of contemporary trauma. Recent works by Raj Kumar, Sonia Leber & David Chesworth and Adeela Suleman all confront the larger socio-political realities of Pakistan in the era of contemporary warfare. Through video and installation, the artists address the experience of the individual in the midst of a continuous state of war. By scanning the landscape with nonsensical logic, futilely seeking to document destruction, and questioning the appropriation of religion, the artworks in the exhibition avoid resolution and closure. Instead, they highlight the individual’s inability to comprehend the expansive uncertainty of combat, and the impossibilities of representing the trauma of conflict.

I don’t want to be there when it happens presents truth as a precarious oscillation between fiction and reality. The artists resist literal or documentary approaches to their subjects, relying instead on speculative, symbolic, ambiguous and unstable modes of representation. In doing so, they emphasise how the individual’s attempts to understand and comprehend the reality of contemporary conflict are equally characterised by uncertainty and irresolvability. I don’t want to be there when it happens also seeks to acknowledge and present a multiplicity of perspectives on the ongoing conflicts in Pakistan and its region—perspectives which are all too easily overlooked or obscured by Western media and political interests.

 

Adeela Suleman’s work to be shown in I don’t want to be there when it happens has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and The Keir Foundation.

Presented in collaboration with:

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About the artists:

Adeela Suleman (b.1970, Karachi, Pakistan, lives and works in Karachi) draws attention to troubled sectarian and gang-led violence in Pakistan. Drawing from the traditions of Islamic art, Suleman moulds hardened steel and co-opts found objects to memorialise the countless killings within her country. With generous support from The Keir Foundation, 4A has co-comissioned Adeela Suleman to create new artworks for I don’t want to be here when it happens.

Suleman studied Sculpture at the Indus Valley School of Art and completed a Master’s degree in International Relations from the University of Karachi. She is the Coordinator of Vasl Artists’ Collective in Karachi, in addition to being Associate Professor and Head of the Fine Art Department at Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture. Suleman has participated extensively with group and solo exhibitions worldwide, including Phantoms of Asia at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco; the 2013 Asian Art Biennial at the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art; Hanging Fire – Contemporary Art from Pakistan at The Asia Society, New York; Gallery Rohtas 2, Lahore; Canvas Gallery, Karachi; Aicon Gallery, New York; and, the International Exhibition of Contemporary Art, Bologna, Italy.

Raj Kumar (b. 1984, Tando Mohammad Khan, Pakistan, lives and works in Tando Mohammad Khan) examines the religious practices, rituals and beliefs of Islam and its place in the contemporary world. Kumar draws from his own Islamic faith and experiences of living in Pakistan, a nation with where 97% of the population are Muslim. This is Kumar’s first international exhibition and is supported by the 4A Set (Sydney) members.

Raj Kumar graduated from the National College of Arts in Textile Design in 2007 and holds a Masters of Visual Arts (Honours) from the National College of Arts, Lahore, Pakistan. The 2015 National College of Arts Degree Show in Lahore was Kumar’s first exhibition as an artist.

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth (Sonia Leber b.1959, Melbourne, Australia, David Chesworth b. 1958, Stoke, England, live and work in Melbourne, Australia) have collaborated since 1996, creating multi-channel sound and media installations for a range of arts and public spaces. The have exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions include Zaum Tractor, Fehily Contemporary, Melbourne, 2014; The Way You Move Me, Fehily Contemporary, Melbourne, 2012; Space-Shifter, Detached/MONA FOMA, Hobart, 2012, and at the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, 2011. Leber & Chesworth premiere their new work, Earthwork, at 4A as part of this exhibition.

Their work has also been included in numerous group exhibitions including Borders, Barriers, Walls, Monash University Museum of Art, 2016; Substation Contemporary Art Prize, Melbourne (winner), 2016; The Documentary Take, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, 2016; 56th Venice Biennale: All the World’s Futures, 2015, 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, 2014; Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2013-14; Cooperation Territory, 16thLine Art Gallery and Makaronka Art Center; Spaced: Art Out of Place, Fremantle Art Centre, 2012; Animal/ Human, UQ Art Museum, Brisbane, 2012; Stealing the Senses, Govett-Brewster Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand, 2011.

Exhibition documentation

 

Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions
variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has been commissioned by
4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Centre: Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions variable, installation view, detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography. Back: Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Centre: Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions
variable, installation view, detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Back: Adeela Suleman, After all
its always someone else who dies
, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view. Courtesy the artist. Both artworks
have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. Image:
Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions
variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has
been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously
supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported
by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre 
for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously 
supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported 
by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre 
for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously 
supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported 
by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre 
for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously 
supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported 
by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view: detail,
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and
generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney
and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Front: Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography. Back: Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Front: Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Back: Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm
(each, 9 mats in total), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Image courtesy the artists.

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary
Asian Art. Image courtesy the artists.

 

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork (video still), (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Artwork and image courtesy the artists.

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork (video still), (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art. Artwork and image courtesy the artists.

 

Front: Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography. Back: Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stero audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

Front: Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view, 4A
Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Back: Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video,
stero audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

 

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view, 4A Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view: detail, 4A
Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view: detail, 4A 
Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view: detail, 4A 
Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Plant Room

22 June – 14 July, 2001. 

Artists: Sarah Goffman, Lisa Kelly and Carla Cescon

Plant Room is a collaborative exhibition by Sarah Goffman, Lisa Kelly and Carla Cescon that reinterprets our urban environment through an artistic process. Anti-aesthetic locations within buildings such as air vents, garbage disposal areas and power generators become potential sources to be explored within the space of the gallery. Sarah Goffman, Lisa Kelly and Carla Cescon are young emerging Sydney-based artists who have exhibited at artist-run spaces.

Header image: Sarah Goffman, Consumer Portraits, 2001, exhibition view

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Sarah Goffman, Consumer Portraits [detail], 2001, exhibition view

Shilpa Gupta

21 April – 19 May 2001.

Shilpa Gupta is a young Indian artist based in Mumbai whose work explores the complex issues of femininity within the contemporary cultural and spiritual life of India. Developed specifically for the Asia-Australia Arts Centre [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art], her installation incorporates video and mixed media. In voicing what is not spoken of, Gupta presents a potent view of feminine issues through three generations of women in her family. This exhibition of Gupta’s work is her first solo exhibition in Australia. She has exhibited in India including the National Gallery of Modern Art, Lakeeren Art Gallery, and the Nehru Centre Art Gallery in India.

shilpa_gupta_2001_installation view
Shilpa Gupta, Untitled, 2000, cloth stained with menstrual blood, video, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

shilpa_gupta_2001_installation_view

Shilpa Gupta, Untitled, 2000, cloth stained with menstrual blood, video, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the Artist.
shilpa_gupta_2001_installation_view
Shilpa Gupta, Untitled, 2000, cloth stained with menstrual blood, video, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the Artist.
Header image: Shilpa Gupta, Untitled, 2000, cloth stained with menstrual blood, video, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

New Releases

15 March – 14 April 2001.

Curator: Emil Goh in association with dLux media arts
Artists: Renaud Bézy* (FRA), Lisa Cheung (CAN), Tiago Carneiro de Cunha (BRA), Volker Eichelmann & Ruth Maclennan (GER/UK), Nayia Frangouli (GRE), Anita Fricek (AUT), Shaun Gladwell & Joshua Raymond (AUS), Emil Goh (MYS), Richard Grayson (UK), Karolyn Hatton* (USA), Ritsuko Hidaka (JPN), Eliza Hutchinson (AUS), Yasu Ichige (JPN), Les Joynes (USA), Ben Judd* (UK), Susan Pui San Lok (UK), Caroline McCarthy* (IRE), Kenny Macleod* (UK), Eline McGeorge* (NOR), Hidenobu Mori (JPN), Helena Oest* (FIN), Jeroen Offerman (NED), Joao Onofre (POR), Raquel Ormella* (AUS), Luke Parker (AUS), Saki Satom* (JPN), Second Planet (JPN), Suzi Triester (UK), Go Watanabe (JPN) and Oliver Zwink (GER)

* on display at the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Presented in association with Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] and the Art Gallery of New South Wales, New Releases, an international survey of original video works orbiting in from over 17 countries curated by Emil Goh. Emil recently returned to Australia from Europe, inspired and armed with works on tape from emerging artists worldwide. Works which encompass animation, non-narrative, narrative, social-documentary, series excerpts and more. New Releases is an association to experience 30 recent works by 33 artists in an off the shelf Video Ezy fashion dLux media arts would like to express its appreciation to Emil Goh for creating a vigorous exhibition of fresh young talent and to Gallery 4A and AGNSW for their generous support of New Releases.

 

The Ineffable

11 February – 10 March, 2001.

Curator: Ramon E.S. Lerma
Artists: Maria Cruz and Victoria Lobregat

This exhibition brings together the work of two Filipina artists, Maria Cruz and Victoria Lobregat, for the first time. The Philippines has a remarkable ability of placing its women at the forefront. Fifteen years after Cory Aquino harnessed ‘people power’ to force dictator Ferdinand Marcos out of office, history repeated itself last weekend when Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo assumed Philippine Presidency after leading a peaceful popular uprising against the discredited Joseph Estrada.

Maria Cruz and Victoria Lobregat were both born in Manila: Lobregat leaving the Philippines at only five years of age, while Cruz completed her tertiary studies prior to migrating to Australia.

Soft Touch

10 February – 10 March 2001. 

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Gaye Chan and Karen Coull

Soft Touch is an exhibition which brings together two lesbian artists – Gaye Chan and Karen Coull – from different cultural perspectives.

Both artists address in different ways issues relating to the representation of women from a lesbian perspective. Chan’s interest in migration and her place within Hawaiian society offers alternative multicultural considerations to debate while Karen Coull’s work deconstructs Australian vernacular readings of femininity.

Soft Touch is part of the 2001 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival.

My Chinatown

23 January – 3 February 2001.

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Contributors: City of Sydney Archives, King Fong, Diana Giese, Shirley Fitzgerald, Annette Shun Wah, Emmanuel Arroney, Kenneth Kwok & Sabrina Man, ACCA, Helen Pecheniuk, National Library of Australia, Irene Moss, Henry Tsang & Victor Tsang, Angela Chan, Gladys Lim, Jeffrey Ng, Mary Lee & Carlos Ung, CYL, Helen Fong, Howard Choy, Allen Yip, Eileen Lai & Lance Lai, John & Lois McEvoy, Benjamin Chow, Mark Costello, Capitol Theatre, Ruth Chong, Lily Ma, Jacqui Wong & Jackson Wong, The Mandarin Club, Linda Wong, Norma Oong, Bobby Leedow, William Yang, Chris Wong, Choy Lee Fut, Cyril & Milla Vincenc, Cyril’s Deli, Shen Jiawei, Maria Stark Bryan, OVB Ipoh, Melissa Smythe, Intro International, Teresa Cheng & Dominic Cheng, Chinatown Promotions, Martin Kwok, Goon Yee Tong and Nick Mahone

The Asia-Australia Arts Centre will present My Chinatown, an exhibition showcasing Sydney Chinatown over the last 150 years.

My Chinatown explores Sydney’s Chinatown and the local community from an historical and contemporary perspective. Photographs from the City of Sydney archives, dating from the 1890s, reflect Chinatown in the turn of the century. Other photographs from community members provide personal reflections of what it was like to be Chinese-Australian. Photographs of Quong Tart are also included. Sound recordings of interviews with Chinese Community leaders give an intimate history of growing up in Chinatown in the 1950s and 60s. While contemporary portraits of Chinese Australians by renowned photographer William Yang brings Chinatown into today’s relevance.

Header image: My Chinatown, 2001, exhibition view

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My Chinatown, 2001, exhibition view

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My Chinatown, 2001, exhibition view

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My Chinatown, 2001, exhibition view

4A Annual Open Members Exhibition

18-21 December 2002

4A Annual Open Members Exhibition.

Featuring artists: George and Ron Adams, Min-Woo Bang, Lucy Barker, Bronwen Bassett, Damian Brinley, Scott Campbell, Simon Champ, Chris and Simon Chapman, Hong Chen, Kent Chuang, Sally Clarke, Sandra Cross, Simon Cuthbert, Dacchi Dang, Nguyen Dao Hoang, Julia Davis, Adam Dorahy, Noella Eun-Ju Oh, Dong Wang Fan, Ruth Anne Fernon, Juliet Fowler Smith, Trevor Fry, Clinton Garofano, Liu Hao-Ou, Brad Hammond, Virginia Hilyard, Anna Ho, Matt Hoggett, Yew-Sun Hu, Tao Hu, Maylei Hunt, Jenny Ihn, Yawen Jang, Edward Johnson, Nelia Justo, Fiona Kemp, Gail Kenning, Hsiu-Li Kuo, John Lee, Lindy Lee, Owen Leong, Helena Leslie, Victoria Lobregat, Lan Lu, Hongyu May Luo, Garrie Maguire, Sophie Maxwell, Wilde McAlliser, Hu Ming, Vanila Netto, K Ng, Narelle Olmo-Murillo, Monte Packham, Hilary Hollock, Debra Porch, Hal Pratt, Dick Quan, Debra Reich, Marlene Sarroff, Sandy Saxon, Aaron Seeto, Josephine Seyfried, Kijeong Song, Bev Southcott, Astrid Spielman, Laura Stekovic, Ka Lydia Sun, Laurens Tan, Tricia Tang, Adrianne Tasker, Felix Terry, My Le Thi, Bic Tieu, Dr. Kai-Kai Toh, Michael Van Langenberg, Lachlan Warner, Nathan Waters, David Wills, Christina Wilmot, Gang Zhao, Ana Young, Haimeng Zhao, Shigemi, Glen Clarke, Wang Xu, Hayden Fowler.

Andy Davey: Golden Rough

27 September – 21 October 2000

Andy Davey is a Sydney based artists whose primary artistic medium is gold. Using both 24 carat precious gold leaf, and the discarded wrappers of ‘Golden Rough’ chocolates, Davey invokes the age-old desire for gold as well as our related contemporary desire to consume it. In this Olympic Year, Davey’s installation at Gallery 4A, is timely, making comment on the “Going for Gold” desire for success, sports, winning, and the gold medals of the Olympic Games.

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner?

Project Centre for Contemporary Art, Wollongong, NSW, 26 October – 14 November 1999
Gallery 4A, Sydney, 30 August – 23 September 2000

Curator: Laurens Tan
Artists: Tom Dion, Dong Wang Fan, Jiyang Jin, Ying Guo, Tiffany Lee-Shoy, Montri Muenowy, Aaron Seeto, Jiawei Shen, Laurens Tan, Ngoc Tran, Savanhdary Vongpoothorn and Lan Wang.

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner? is a survey exhibition of Asian Australian artists living and working in the Illawarra and southern regions of Sydney. Taking its title from the 60’s classica starring Sydney Poitier, Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner explores the involvement of Asian Australians in the shaping of our Australian community, while at the same time revealing the diversity of their cultural heritage and experiences.

The twelve artists in Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner? represent a smorgasbord of established and emerging practitioners, newly migrated and Australian-born Asian Australians, working in the areas of painting, sculpture, installation, multi-media and photography.

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner? is a Wollongong City Gallery state-wide touring exhibition initiated by the Project Centre for Contemporary Art, and supported by the Wollongong Image Campaign.

Header image: Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner?, 2000, exhibition view
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Ying Guo, Untitled, 1998, watercolour on paper.
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Jiyang Jin, Dao-Yi and Huai-Rang, 1997, oil on canvas; Dong Wan Fan, Decendants #2 – Black Shadows, 1996, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, Courtesy of the University of Wollongong Art Collection; Lan Wang, Chinese Opera Stories No. 5, 1996, synthetic polymer paint on paper; Aaron Seeto, This Little Piggy Went to Market, 1999, Type C photograph; Aaron Seeto, TStill Life with Fishmonger, 1999, Type C photograph.
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Jaiwei Shen, Standing on Guard for our great Motherland, 1974, oil on canvas; Laurens Tan, Mars Cafe, 2000, perspex; Laurens Tan, Cafe Curtains, 1999, photograph on perspex in aluminium backlit display.
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L-R: Tiffany Lee-Shoy, Untitled, 1999, hand stitched cheong-sam, Chinese embroidered satin, lurex thread, huaniu satin binding, willow pattern china, digitally printed tracing paper and banana lollies; Montri Muenouy, In Remembrance of, 1993, B+W photograph; Ngoc Tran, Untitled, 1999, wax and oil paint on velvet jewellery box; Tom Dion, Barney, 1993, silver gelatin print; Tom Dion, Ernie, 1993, silver gelatin print; Tom Dion, Watches, 1999, wood, glass, velvet, pins, watches, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive; Tom Dion, The Dion Family, photo taken 1919, resin coated print, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive; Tom Dion, Bus Mirror, circa 1940, mirrored glass and wood, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive; Tom Dion, Uncle Tom, 1994, silver gelatin print, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive; Tom Dion, Alma, 1993, silver gelatin print, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive.
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Aaron Seeto, This Little Piggy Went to Market, 1999, Type C photograph; Aaron Seeto, TStill Life with Fishmonger, 1999, Type C photograph; Aaron Seeto, Butcher, Undercover Markets, Hong Kong, 1999, Type C photograph.
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Jiyang Jin, Dao-Yi and Huai-Rang, 1997, oil on canvas; Jiyang Jin, Lohans, 1999, oil on canvas; Jiyang Jin, Lohans, 1999, oil on canvas; Jiyang Jin, Dan-Xia and Da-Yu, 1997, oil on canvas; Savanhdray Vongpoothorn, Light Kasina, 1995, fibre washers and synthetic polymer paste on canvas; Savanhdray Vongpoothorn, Rain, 1998, synthetic polymer paint on perforated canvas; Tiffany Lee-Shoy, Untitled, 1999, hand stitched cheong-sam, Chinese embroidered satin, lurex thread, huaniu satin binding, willow pattern china, digitally printed tracing paper and banana lollies.
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Lan Wang, Chinese Opera Stories No. 5, 1996, synthetic polymer paint on paper; Lan Wang, Chinese Ancient Figures No. 5, 1996, synthetic polymer paint on paper; Lan Wang, Spring Ox (Red Chinese Characters), 1997, synthetic polymer paint on paper.
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Laurens Tan, Mars Cafe, 2000, perspex; Laurens Tan, Cafe Curtains, 1999, photograph on perspex in aluminium backlit display.
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Savanhdray Vongpoothorn, Light Kasina, 1995, fibre washers and synthetic polymer paste on canvas; Savanhdray Vongpoothorn, Rain, 1998, synthetic polymer paint on perforated canvas.

 

Mandy Ridley: Chinatown Souvenirs (On Not Knowing)

2 – 26 August 2000

Mandy Ridley is an artist based in Queensland, whose exhibition Chinatown Souvenirs (On Not Knowing) delicately replicates original handcrafted objects and garments found in the Chinatowns of Brisbane and Sydney. Utilising decorative and found tourist objects, Ridley, as a non-Asian woman, recreates these objects at a greater scale and with greater intensity of colours. These richly crafted objects attempt to understand the complex layers of our multicultural society through an exploration of appropriation and cultural authenticity.

Felicia Kan: Different Fields Different Skies

7 June – 1 July 2000.

Landscape photographer Felicia Kan’s works reflect the sublime beauty of the Australian and New Zealand landscape. The large-scale photographs are minimal yet sensual: empty fields, calm seas, cloud formations.

Felicia Kan: Different Fields Different Skies is an official satellite exhibition of the 12th Biennale of Sydney: Biennale of Sydney 2000

Header image: Felicia Kan: Different Fields Different Skies, 2000, installation view

 

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Felicia Kan, Different Fields Different Skies, 2000, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

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Felicia Kan, Ocean no.1, 2, 3, 1998, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium.

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Felicia Kan, Different Fields Different Skies, 2000, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Artshadows

Felicia Kan, Shallows, 1998, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium.installation-view

Felicia Kan, Sky no.1-8, 2000, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium.

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Felicia Kan, Field no. 1, 1996, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium; Field no. 12, 2000, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium; Untitled (field), 1994, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium.

Marine Ky: Prey (Pray)

5 – 29 July 2000

Marine Ky explores the recent history of Cambodia and how it relates to her own history of displacement, through an installation which utilises a combination of printmaking techniques and textiles. In her ephemeral installation Prey (Pray), Ky suspends sack-like forms amongst images from the Cambodian Genocide Tuol Sleng Image Database held by the University of New South Wales and Yale University, USA, to create a space which contemplates how memory distorts and refabricates.

Greg Leong Kwok-Keung: Remembering Chinese

5 – 29 July 2000

Greg Leong Kwok-Keung is an artist based in Tasmania, whose exhibition Remembering Chinese consists of lavishly decorated Chinese costumes and textiles based upon traditional designs and motifs. Utilising the symbolism of the dragon and ‘Double Happiness’, these richly crafted objects and textiles attempt to reclaim and understand the rich layers of Leong’s cultural heritage as well as to recontextualise the traditional within the contemporary.

 

Cherine Fahd: Operation Nose Nose Operation

10 May – 3 June 2000

Cherine Fahd explores the changing face of Australia in a direct and humourous manner. Operation Nose Nose Operation is a quirky performance-based photographic installation which invokes both fashion and identity through the large and quite dominant noses of Arabic and Mediterranean people. In search of noses to cast, Fahd has taken Operation Nose Nose Operation to the local high schools, universities, pubs and bars of Beirut, Lebanon, casting and bandaging unwary participants’ noses with an almost surgical precision.

Operation Nose Nose Operation is part of an international project titled Sydney/Beirut – Beirut/Sydney.

Operation Nose Nose Operation is an official event of the Mercedes Australian Fashion Week Festival.

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Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation, installation view, 2000, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

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Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation, installation view, 2000, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

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L-R: Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Nathalie), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Khalo Maurice Azouri), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Cisi), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Sylvana), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Andre Azouri), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Nathalie’s Friend), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Cherril), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. All images courtesy the artist.

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Left to right from top: Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (unknown), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Ziko), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Najib), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Fulvio), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Fuzzy Wuzzy), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Marwan), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Helen), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. All images courtesy the artist.
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L-R: Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Mireille + Pauline), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Noriko), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (unknown), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. All images courtesy the artist.
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Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Noriko), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. 

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Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (unknown), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
Header image: Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Jido + Teta), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Courtesy the Artist.

 

William Yang: The Australian Chinese

10 May – 3 June 2000

William Yang is one of Australia’s best known photographers, whose photographs and monologues draw upon his Chinese heritage and Asian-Australian experiences to explore an ever changing Australian Identity. The Australian Chinese is Yang’s first photographic exhibition which explores the lives and stories of Chinese migrants in Australia.

Skulls and Solicitors

 12 April – 6 May 2000

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Michael Dagostino and David Griggs

Michael Dagostino and David Griggs’ exhibition Skulls and Solicitors is a collaboration which addresses the question of what happens when the “Australian dream” goes wrong? What becomes of the dreamer? What becomes of the dream? Dagostino and Griggs’ photographic and mixed media installation tells a story of abandonment, survival and economic struggle through images of empty buildings and empty billboards.

Michael Dagostino and David Griggs are both Sydney based artists who have participated in exhibitions at First Draft, 151 Regent Street and were both included in the 1997 Australian Perspecta at the Casula Power House.

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David Griggs, Without Knowing Which Way is North, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

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David Griggs, Without Knowing Which Way is North, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

Header image: David Griggs, The Swarm, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

Harriet Parsons: Domestic Science: Planework

12 April – 6 May 2000

Harriet Parsons is a young Melbourne-based artist whose exhibition Domestic Science: Planework, consists of sensual sculptures constructed from satin, wire and muslin. These beautiful and whimsical objects, based on natural forms such as single cell organisms, are suspended so that they float throughout the gallery space. In previous works, Parsons has embroidered intricate animal and skeleton shapes with the artists’ own hair. This exhibition continues her exploration of the beauty of scientific representations.

David Sequeira and Kate Mackay

15 March – 8 April 2000

David Sequeira’s approach to decoration is informed by an interest in classification and order. Using flower petals, leaves, books, colour and light he organises these materials into intricate patterns which explore wider systems of knowledge.

Kate Mackay’s installation also explores decoration through the manipulation of natural materials. In this work she uses flower petals and other natural materials to explore the possibilities of decoration.

Huê

25 October – 16 November, 2002
Curator: Aaron Seeto
Artists: Glen Clarke, Bonita Ely, Gail Joy Kenning, Sud Pedley and Boyd

Huê is a group exhibition bringing together the work of five installation artists Glen Clarke, Bonita Ely, Gail Joy Kenning, Sue Pedley & Boyd and their recent experiences of Vietnam.

In December 1998 these artists participated in the 2nd International Sculpture Symposium in Vietnam. The experiences working in a foreign culture in sometimes cyclonic conditions, engaging with other international artists and using new materials have had a profound affect on these artists’ practices. This exhibition reflects upon the artists’ separate yet integrated experiences in Vietnam from an Australian perspective. The artists have a range of professional and artistic experience, and have exhibited in Australia and overseas in such galleries as Sherman Galleries, Hargrave and Artspace in Sydney, and Oldknows Gallery and the Royal Collage of Art in Britain.

Renee So: Simple Pleasures

25 October – 16 November, 2002

Simple Pleasures is an exhibition of knitted sculptures by emerging Melbourne-based artist Renee So. So began knitting as a hobby in 1996 and has engaged in it professionally ever since. Simple Pleasures continues her exploration of knitting as an artistic medium and visual language.

In this exhibition, So incorporates various hand and machine knitting techniques to create a body of all-knitted sculptural works. The knitted sculptures offer the viewer tactile and emotive pleasures by referencing the sentimental and reassuring evocations of knitting. The sculptures are accessible and playful objects that transform the gallery into a retreat from the complexities that an urban lifestyle can entail.


Renee So is currently a 200 Gertrude Street studio artist and has exhibited at 200 Gertrude Street, the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane as well as a number of artist-run initiatives in Melbourne.

Shen Jiawei: Zai-jian Revolution

27 September – 17 October 2002

Zai-jian Revolution is Shen Jaiwei’s first major solo exhibition since arriving in Australia in 1989. The title of the exhibition, in Mandarin means “Goodbye Revolution” but also “to see you again”. The exhibition features eight major works including Standing Guard for the Great Motherland (1974) and Tasting Snow on the Wanda Mountains (1972) painted at the height of the Cultural Revolution.

Standing Guard for the Great Motherland (1974) is perhaps the most famous painting of Shen Jiawei’s during this period that survives. After approval  by Jiang Quing, Mao Tse-Tung’s wife and the main cultural policy maker within the Revolution, and after slight modification to the portraits to confirm to party policy, this painting was reproduced in the millions and distributed throughout China.


Shen Jiawei is largely a self-taught artist who, like the other youth of his generation was sent to Northern China as labourers and border guards physically working for and protecting a cause. In Northern Manchuria in the 1970’s within a corps of other Army artists, Shen worked the land and developed artistic skills within the structure of the People’s Liberation Army. It was during this time that paintings such as Tasting Snow and Standing Guard for Our Great Motherland were painted.

His works are in significant international collections including the China Art Gallery and Museum of the Chinese Revolution, both in Beijing. His work is little known outside of China, though he was included in China: 5000 years at the Guggenheim Museum, New York and in Bilbao.

Born in Shanghai in 1948, he migrated to Australia in January 1989 and now lives in Sydney. In Australia Shen has established a reputation for accomplished realistic portraits that have featured in the Archibald Prize at the Art Gallery of NSW, Doug Moran Portrait Prize, and Mary McKillop Art prize. Most recently his work featured in the Federation 1901-2001 exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

Vivien Sung: Five-Fold Happiness

4 October – 19 October 2002

Gallery 4A is delighted to announce the opening of Vivien Sung’s art exhibition and book launch Five-fold Happiness. The offical launch of the Five Fold Happiness book and exhibition will take place at 6PM Friday 4 October – 19 October 2002.

The exhibition and book explore symbols, words and imagery related to the elements of five-fold happiness. Sung views the fulfilment of these concepts – luck, prosperity, longevity, happiness and wealth – as a means to enrichen oneself and to find humour and delight in the physical world.


Vivien Sung is a first-generation Australian author born and raised in Sydney with parents from Shanghai. Sung graduated from the University of Technology, Sydney with a degree in visual communication and has studied Mandarin at Beijing Normal University. A frequent traveller to China, Sung has designed books and magazines for Chronicle Books, San Francisco; Rizzoli, New York City; Random House, Australia; Fairfax Publications, Australia; and Conde Nest, Australia. Five-Fold Happiness is Sung’s first book.

Denorah Paauwe: Tuesday’s Child, Juliet Fowler-Smith: Make Yourself at Home & Clinton Garofano: Motorhead

SYDNEY. 30 AUGUST – 21 SEPTEMBER 2002.

Gallery 4A is pleased to present three new exhibitions of photography and site-specific installation by Deborah Paauwe, Juliet Fowler-Smith and Clinton Garofano.

Tuesday’s Child is Deborah Paauwe‘s first solo exhibition in Sydney. The exhibition depicts young girls and women with qualities of beauty, sensuality and lusciousness, but highlighting a sense of imperfection and ambiguity. Paauwe uses fashion and ambiguity to comment on notions of the development of identity, in particular the complexity of interpersonal relationship.

Make Yourself At Home is a site-specific installation by Juliet Fowler-Smith that responds to the formal architectural qualities of Gallery 4A to explore its historical, social and cultural position. It is a richly layered installation that uses materials such as bees wax, brightly coloured wrapping paper and chairs to examine how we respond to and experience place.

Motorhead by Clinton Garofano is a series of new photographs that brings speed obsessed, streetcar culture within the confines of the Gallery. Garofano’s photographs of leopard skin-clad car interiors and skull encrusted gear sticks focus on imagining the extremes of existence and mortality to explore contemporary identities.


Deborah Paauwe was born in the USA, and is now based in Adelaide, and is of Dutch and Chinese heritage. In 1999, Deborah Paauwe was a finalist for the Moet & Chandon Fellowship; she has been included in group exhibitions at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia, and the Art Gallery of South Australia. In 2001 she was the only Australian representative at Fotonoviembre photographic biennial, Centro de Fotografia, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain,

Juliet Fowler-Smith is a Sydney-based artist whose installation practice includes artworks created both within galleries and the outdoors in Australia, at Mangrove Mountain, NSW. More recently in 200 she was invited to be a participant at the International Environment Art Symposoum at the Taejong Lake and Royal Tomb Park, Ara Gaya, South Korea.

Clinton Garofano is a Sydney based artist who has exhibited extensively throughout Sydney and Melbourne. He has exhibited at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Orange Regional Gallery, Artspace Sydney as well as Yuill/Crowley Gallery, Sydney, Karyn Lovegrove Gallery, Melbourne and internationally in New York and Japan.

Dialogue – Multi Polar

5 – 27 July 2002
Curator: Zhao Shulin

Dialogue – Multi Polar is an exhibition of video art and video documentation of underground performance art from China.

This video project is curated by Zhao Shulin and features some of China’s most exciting experimental artists using the medium of video to explore aspects of a changing identity, economy and the effects of globalisation occurring in China.

Bronia Iwanczak: Exit/Salida, George Poonkhin Khut: Chinoiseries (Lost in Translation) & Richard Butler-Bowdon: Nine Contemporary Australians

7 – 29 June 2002

Gallery 4a is delighted to present three exhibitions that explore culture, identity and ethnicity through sound, installation, photography and portraiture.

Exit/Salida is an exhibition by Bronia Iwanczak that incorporates photography and sculptural installation to explore identity in its various forms. Iwanczak is concerned with the formation and embodiment of identity, its organic source in land and place, and the relationships between individual and collective identity.

Chinoiseries (Lost in Translation) is a sound installation by George Poonkhin Khut that explores cultural authenticity, ethnicity and ambiguity between Anglo-Australian and Chinese-Malaysian cultures. Khut creates a sound installation where he takes recordings of spoken Mandarin, splices these sounds and rearranges them into a jumbled sonic collage. Through this, he humorously questions his own identity as a Chinese man who cannot speak Chinese.

Nine Contemporary Australians by Richard Butler-Bowdon is an exhibition of portraits that deal with cultural exchange and Asian identity in contemporary Australian urban life. He depicts individuals from a variety of cultural backgrounds such as Samoa, Japan and Vietnam who represent the complexity of Asian-Australian identities in Australia.


Bronia Iwanczak is a Sydney-based artist who has been exhibiting since 1988 both overseas and throughout Australia, including the Contemporary Art Centre in Adelaide and Ian Potter Gallery in Melbourne.

George Poonkhin Khut has been working since 1987 in a variety of media including sound, video, design, installation and performance. He has exhibited widely in Australia including the Adelaide Fringe Festival, the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and Art Space in Sydney.

Richard Butler-Bowdon is a painter and installation artist who has been exhibiting since 1993 in a number of solo and group exhibitions including Nexus Multicultural Gallery-Lion Arts Centre Adelaide South Australia, Spencer Street Gallery in West Melbourne and BUS Gallery in Melbourne.

Michael Thomson: Untitled, Cherine Fahd + Eloise de Hautecloclque: Musing & Debra Reich: Desiderata

26 April – 1 June 2002

Gallery 4A is pleased to present three exhibitions exploring ideas of seduction and desire through photography and fashion.

In Untitled, Michael Thomson assembles fur and fake fur coats into forms that allude to the feminine form. Essentially these fur assemblages are a formalist project that deals with texture, colour and shape, but also invite multiple readings through the luxury of the fur coats and the kitsch through their synthetic counterparts.

Musing by Eloise de Hautecloclque and Cherine Fahd explores ideas of collaboration and the body through photography and fashion. Using found garments, de Hauteclocque creates sensual sculptural objects, often stitched together by poetic texts describing both desire and absence. Fahd’s photographs of her muse, also reveals the body by trying to conceal it. In these small intimate photographs de Hautecloclque appears, documenting performance like moments within domestic spaces.

Desiderata is an exhibition by Debra Reich, a young and emerging artists based in Sydney. Reich’s work explores notions of beneath and above ground as a poetic parallel to physical and emotional states. In this work, Reich has photographed and digitally manipulated seedpods and other organic forms to a point of abstraction. Reich speaks of the seed and seed pod within these digitally constructed landscapes as carrying a symbolic richness and playing an integral role in communicating the irony of a constructed landscape which holds no life.


Michael Thomson is an artist based in regional NSW (Bathurst). His most recent project was the Canberra Contemporary Art Space earlier this year.

Eloise de Hauteclocque combines clothing and photography within her artistic practice. She has exhibited as part of Mercedes Australian Fashion Week, at Rubyayre Gallery, Sydney as well as at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney.

Cherine Fahd is an artist based in Sydney who has exhibited at Artspace Sydney, Gold Coast City Gallery and Casula Powerhouse. She is represented by Gitte Weise Gallery, Sydney.

Debra Reich is a recent graduate of the National Art School. She was recently included in Momento Flori  at the Australian Centre for Photography. This will be her first solo exhibition.


Exhibition Documentation

 

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Eloise de Hauteclocque, Kiss Me (Kiss me here, and here and here…), 2002, cotton lace dress, silk thread, exhibition view Asia-Australia Arts Centre [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art].

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Cherine Fahd and Eloise de Hauteclocque, Musing exhibition view, 2002, Asia-Australia Arts Centre [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art]

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Cherine Fahd and Eloise de Hauteclocque, Musing exhibition view, 2002, Asia-Australia Arts Centre [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art]

Mandy Ridley: In Celebration, Adam Doray: Untitled (Another Study Between Focal Tension and All Things Pleasant) & Angharad Rixon: Anchaini an Ghra (Requests of Love)

15 March – 20 April 2002

Gallery 4A is pleased to present three exhibitions by emerging artists from Sydney and Queensland which explore ideas of decoration, memory and domesticity.

In Celebration by Mandy Ridley replicates the celebratory papercraft and objects found in the Chinatowns of Brisbane and Sydney. Utilising these decorative found tourist objects, Ridley, recreates these objects at a greater scale and with a greater intensity of colours. As a non-Asian woman, Ridley’s richly crafted objects attempt to understand the complex layers of our multicultural society through an exploration of appropriation and cultural authenticity.

Untitled (another study between focal tension and all things pleasant), explores the ideas of domesticity, beauty and desire. Adam Dorahy presents a single large wall painting, based upon a floral motif, delicately painted using slightly reflective white and house paints. These paintings appear and disappear into the white walls of the gallery as the viewer moves around the gallery.

Anchaini an ghra (requests of love) is an exhibition by Angharad Rixon, a young artist based in Sydney who creates incredibly beautiful objects through a structural and conceptual exploration of lace. “Lace,” Rixon says, “is about holes. I am fascinated by the spaces between things…the breath between words, rests within music and the space that remains when something is gone.” Rixon uses this traditional craft practice to create networks of spaces, these small fragments of lace are then soaked in slip porcelain, which are later fired, to reveal a network of empty holes.


Mandy Ridley lives and works in Brisbane and has had exhibitions at various artist run spaces in Queensland including Soapbox, Smith + Stonely and Palace Gallery, she has also exhibited at the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane and Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery.

Adam Dorahy is a recent graduate of the University of Western Sydney. Dorahy has exhibited at Artspace, Sydney, Kudos Gallery, Sydney as well as at the University of Western Sydney.

Angharad Rixon is a recent graduate from the University of Wollongong, she has exhibited in exhibitions at The Long Gallery, Wollongong; Kudos Gallery, Paddington, in 2000 she was included in the National Graduate Exhibition at the Perth Institute of Contemporary.

4A Members’ Exhibition 2003

From 18 December 2003

Over one hundred works by one hundred Asian-Australian Arts Association members will be exhibited at this year’s Annual Members’ Exhibition. The opening night will include toasts by guest speakers as well as raffles with prizes sponsored by Sydney businesses. Everyone is welcome and all profits will go back into bringing more contemporary Asian art to Sydney as well as supporting local and emerging artists, and community and education programs.