Linda Sang: Chinoiserie

4 – 27 September 1997

Chinoiserie was Linda Sang’s new exhibition at Gallery 4A. Utilising food from Chinese cooking as a material for art, Sang prepared a visual delight.

Linda Sang created a tableau which mimics a traditional Chinese household. Latticework window screens, red plush carpet and claw feet table provided a setting for the unexpected.

 

Header Image: Chinoiserie, 1997, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. From clockwise left to right: Linda Sang, Moss Table, 1997, painted wood, moss. Linda Sang, Tripe Butterfly Chair, 1995, latex, steel. Linda Sang, Jack Fruit Footstool, 1997, wood, latex. Linda Sang, “Miss Sang” after “Miss Wong”, Tretchlkoff, 1997, oil on canvas, wood, painted by Jude Walker. Linda Sang, Chinese Cabbage Standing Lamp, 1997, latex, steel, perspex. Linda Sang, Bitter Melon Butterfly Chair, 1997, latex, steel. With thanks to Jude Walker and Gail Daley. All images courtesy the artist. 

Rhyme and Reason

16 October – 8 November 1997

Curator: Felicia Kan
Artists: Stephen Bambury, Vicente Butron, Marco Fusinato, Melinda Harper, Felicia Kan and Susan Norrie.


Exhibition documentation

rhymereason_installation_4

L-R: Susan Norrie, Violent Grey, 1997, oil on wood, glass frame, oil on canvas. Courtesy of Mori Gallery, Sydney. Vicente Butron, Yellow Painting, Done With A Modicum of Love (from s-l-s) no. 162, 1997, graphite and acrylic on aluminium. Felicia Kan, Liberty and Equality (Black/White), 1997, 2 panels, oil on canvas. Courtesy of Mori Gallery, Sydney. Melinda Harper, untitled, 1996, oil on canvas. Courtesy of David Pestorius Gallery, Brisbane.

Victoria Lobregat: An Endlessly Reflective Net of Jewels

12 July – 2 August 1997

Victoria Lobregat (b. Manila, Philippines)

An Endlessly Reflective Net of Jewels was Victoria Lobregat’s exhibition of new paintings, a series of small canvas boards arranged into discrete grids formed an unusual narrative with fragments from everyday life and symbols of different cultures.

Having worked as an illustrator and designer for Hot Tuna, Lobregat is familiar with the power of the symbol. Employing an idiosyncratic logic she pairs the spiritual with consumer desire – Lobregat combines motifs from a variety of sources ranging from Buddhist prayer symbols to logos from surf brands.

Dacchi Dang: 5 x 5

6 June – 5 July 1997

Artist Statement:

5×5 is a series of black and white silver gelatine prints about my journey and exploration of the Vietnam landscape.

During the war, it was very difficult for many Vietnamese to explore the country because of the heavy fighting in the country. After the war ended, South Vietnam was effected badly from the social and economic cause of the North Communist government. My family like many other families had to work hard to earn some money for living and did not have much time for leisure. Not until my return in 1995, I had an opportunity to explore the country landscape for the first time.

These landscapes have given me a deep impression. City and country life styles always have a big difference between them. The city have a polluted environment because from the noise of the transport, people or new development. In contrast, when I was in the country, I had the feeling of walking back in time. The life style was more simple than city life. My interest is to capture this beautiful tranquility, and relate this experience through the image. It is soft and misty, light falling gently to the land, and bursting out of a peaceful and calm atmosphere that is hard to forget.

Elizabeth Pulie + Savanhdary Vongpoothorn

10 April – 3 May 1997

If art production is thought of in a Freudian sense as being an act of compulsion then the joint exhibition of Elizabeth Pulie and Savanhdary Vongpoothorn at Sydney’s Gallery 4A must have been the result of the respective obsessive-compulsive conditions. Each artist presented four works created via manically repeated actions: intricate beading in the case of Pulie and multiple pointillist-style needle pricks in the case of Vongpoothorn.

Pulie’s and Vongpoothorn’s exhibition was the second to be held at the recently opened Gallery 4A in Sydney’s Chinatown.

Inaugural Exhibition

4A’s first ever exhibition.

Exhibiting artists: Emil Goh, Lindy Lee, Hou Leong

 

http://www.4a.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Installation_shot_2_1997.jpg

Clockwise from left: Emil Goh, The Bride (The Last Nonya), 1996, type C print. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Emil Goh, The Wedding (The Last Nonya), 1996, type C print. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Lindy LeeBirds of Appetite, 1996, wax and synthetic polymer paint on board. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

http://www.4a.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Installation_shot_3_1997.jpg

Left: Hou Leong, An Australian: Cricket Hero, 1994, digital colour photograph. Installation view, detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney.
Right: Lindy Lee, Birds of Appetite, 1996, wax and synthetic polymer paint on board. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

Inaugural exhibition_hou_leong_1994_autobiography_with_chairman_mao_digital_photography

Hou Leong, Autobiography: With Chairman Mao, 1994, digital photograph. Courtesy the artist and Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney.
Header Image: Clockwise from left: Lindy LeeBirds of Appetite, 1996, wax and synthetic polymer paint on board. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney. Emil Goh, The Wedding (The Last Nonya), 1996, type C print. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Emil Goh, The Bride (The Last Nonya), 1996, type C print. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. 

Re-Orienting Representations of Asian-Australian Communities

1 – 6 December 1997

The exhibition of Gennifer Hirano was a visual documentation of different Asian-Australians who emigrated to or were born in Australia and their experiences with culture, assimilation, representation, sexuality and other identity “crisis” issues. A wide variety of people from different occupations, nationalities and age groups were chosen to be a part of this exhibition in an attempt to dismantle the opinion that “all Asians are alike.” The work is very much about stereotypes and impressions. It is under the the theme that negative and positive are one of the few concepts that are simultaneously universal and subjective. The performance work “Identity Crisis” examined the journey from self-denial to self hatred to self discovery which many minorities in white Anglo countries like the U.S. and Australia have embarked upon to some degree. A gang member, a Japanese-Australian art student, a Vietnamese refugee, a lesbian political activist, a TV presenter on Fox Channel, two G.P.s, the beautiful child of two Asian mothers all in the same room? Under the same category? The work is about a group of people, their trials and talents that run much deeper and more captivating than any discussion about Pauline Hanson.

Members of the Asian and non Asian communities were invited to attend this aesthetic informative presentation in hopes that they may come away with a “Re-Orientated” Presentational of what Asian-Australia is.

Take Away

13 – 29 November 1997

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Chi Min Chan, Nelia Justo, Harriet Parsons, Renata Petanceski and Angelina Marcon.

Take Away is an exhibition featuring the work of five emerging Sydney-based artists. While the exhibition does not have prescriptive theme, a number of common issues do circulate throughout the work. Shared concerns for the de-construction of interior environments as well as a sense of intimacy are prevalent in each of the artists work. A doorway of still water, botanical specimens, hair embroidery, copper sound weaving and a boxed Buddha are just some of the works on show at Take Away.

Qi Yong Lin: Ching Paintings

29 September – 4 October 1997

 

Artist’s Statement, October 1997

The series I have called “I Ching Paintings” were developed over a period of seven years. My aim was to pursue a fresh interpretation of nature through my technique. On further study of “I Ching”, I was amazed to find that the metaphysical symbols in my pictures co-incided with the characters of “I Ching”. This made be believe deeply in the interaction between the universe of nature and human beings’ inner universe. In the paintings, I explore the relationship between human beings and nature. Changes are represented by using colours and numbers in a unity of opposites, with the aim of providing a true picture of the universe.

Similar

7 August – 30 August 1997.

Gallery 4A presented the work of Tim Johnson and My Lee Thi in an exhibition exploring ideas of transculturalism.

Although Thi had collaborated on a number of paintings with Johnson, this was the first time that they exhibited their work side by side.

This exhibition looked at these two art practices as parallel—informed by similar cultural influences—yet with different formal approaches.

Tim Johnson is a well respected Australian artist who has been exhibiting for the past twenty years. He has held exhibition in Gemrnay, Japan and the United States. In Australia he has also shown at the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Museum of Contemporary Art. Although a central figure in the Australian conceptual movement of the 70s, Johnson’s recent work is characterised by a process of cultural distillation. His paintings combine influences from Eastern, Buddhist art, Western Aboriginal Desert painting and Asian symbols.

My Le Thi was born in the South of Vietnam. Her paintings and collages reflect this cultural heritage through the inclusion of Vietnamese poetry and sayings. The subjects of these texts are often about farming which Thi uses as a metaphor for the vitality of life. Her intimate works possess a delicate sensibility: grains of rice are paired with sketches of farmers.