Eugenia Raskopoulos: Untitled 00

27 September – 21 October 2000

In the experimental spirit of the Picasso flashlight drawings, Eugenia Raskopoulos has created an elegant photographic exhibition that plays with the veracity of the black and white image. Untitled 00 is an extension of work exhibited earlier this year at the Australian Centre for Photography where the artist, light source in hand, documented the making of minimal and extravagant gestures in front of the camera.

Sue Pedley: Midday – Sound to Drawing, Drawing to Sound

2 – 26 August 2000

Sue Pedley’s installation at Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] has been inspired by her participation in the Second Vietnamese Sculptural Symposium held in Hue in 1998. Using sounds that she has recorded from her local environment, her prints and installation expand upon ideas of visual and audio pattern and rhythm, representing vibrations of sound and silence with colour and line.

Persuasion

16 February – 18 March, 2000

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Michael Shaowanasai and Toby Huynh

Thai male prostitutes and the rituals of Chinese marriage feature in this exhibition by Thai-American Michael Shoawanasai and Vietnamese-Australian Toby Huynh.

Michael Shaowanasai focuses on sex for sale. His works at alternative galleries and public sites in Bangkok explore the male sex worker in one of the most infamous destinations for sex tourism within our region. Shaowanasai’s installation and performances for the Festival critically evaluate the sex industry in Thailand by recreating a Go-Go bar, complete with instructional video.

Toby Huynh’s digital images explore the rituals associated with Chinese marriages. Huynh’s work proposes and alternative set of rituals that Buddhist same-sex couples could perform. Would couples, for instance, kneel down in front of their ancestors and offer them tea? These images subtly evoke the tension between traditional cultural and religious values and contemporary gay and lesbian life.

Persuasion is a visual art event for the 2000 Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival.

4A Members’ Exhibition 2000

19 – 23 December 2000

Artists: Min-Woo Bang, Graeme Bannerman, Zara Collins, Leonardo Cremonese, Amanda Donohue, Cherine Fahd, Heather Fernon, Peter Fray, Emil Goh, Sue Hajdu, Ellen Hernandez, Satoru Hidaka, Glenys Jackson, Liu Yi, Victoria Lobregat, Garrie Maguire, Dani Marti, Paul McInnes, Gia Nghi Phung, Fernando Octavio Pino, Dick Quan, Vikki Quill, Eugenia Raskopoulos, Lean Im Saunders, Aaron Seeto, Mu Shunjun, Jeanette Siebols, Beverly Southcott, Xu Wang, Lachlan Warner and Ruth Watson.

 

Poisonous Targets

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26 October – 18 November 2000.

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Wong Hoy Cheong (Malaysia) and Rea
Catalogue available in the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art library.

Gallery 4A [4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art] is pleased to announce an exhibition featuring Malaysian artist Wong Hoy Cheong and Australian urban Indigenous artist Rea, as the first exhibition and international project to be held at Gallery 4A’s new premises at the Corporation Building.

Poisonous Targets engages with ideas of cultural diversity and multiculturalism from two very different and culturally specific vantages, seeking to complicate and question the common understanding of the term.

Wong Hoy Cheong is one of Malaysia’s most prominent artists, whose practice involves drawing, installation and performance to explore issues central to his cultural identity. In Poisonous Targets, Wong uses botanical materials such as tomato, tobacco, coconut, papaya, tapioca and tea, which are both indigenous and introduced species to Malaysia, to create masks moulded from the faces of different ethnic groups that make up Malaysia to examine ideas of social history and migration.

Rea is a well respected Indigenous artist whose practice has consisted of photographic and digital imaging as a means of exploring her grandmother’s experience as a stolen child. There issues are important not only to her own experience of Aboriginality, but also significant to a wider understanding of the multicultural experience in Australia.

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Wong Hoy Cheong, exhibition ‘Poisonous Targets’, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.  Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, Poison, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, The Colonies Bite Back, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
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Wong Hoy Cheong, The Colonies Bite Back, 2000, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
Header Image: Wong Hoy Cheong, exhibition ‘Poisonous Targets’, 2000, Installation viewInstallation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Andy Davey: Golden Rough

27 September – 21 October 2000

Andy Davey is a Sydney based artists whose primary artistic medium is gold. Using both 24 carat precious gold leaf, and the discarded wrappers of ‘Golden Rough’ chocolates, Davey invokes the age-old desire for gold as well as our related contemporary desire to consume it. In this Olympic Year, Davey’s installation at Gallery 4A, is timely, making comment on the “Going for Gold” desire for success, sports, winning, and the gold medals of the Olympic Games.

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner?

Project Centre for Contemporary Art, Wollongong, NSW, 26 October – 14 November 1999
Gallery 4A, Sydney, 30 August – 23 September 2000

Curator: Laurens Tan
Artists: Tom Dion, Dong Wang Fan, Jiyang Jin, Ying Guo, Tiffany Lee-Shoy, Montri Muenowy, Aaron Seeto, Jiawei Shen, Laurens Tan, Ngoc Tran, Savanhdary Vongpoothorn and Lan Wang.

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner? is a survey exhibition of Asian Australian artists living and working in the Illawarra and southern regions of Sydney. Taking its title from the 60’s classica starring Sydney Poitier, Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner explores the involvement of Asian Australians in the shaping of our Australian community, while at the same time revealing the diversity of their cultural heritage and experiences.

The twelve artists in Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner? represent a smorgasbord of established and emerging practitioners, newly migrated and Australian-born Asian Australians, working in the areas of painting, sculpture, installation, multi-media and photography.

Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner? is a Wollongong City Gallery state-wide touring exhibition initiated by the Project Centre for Contemporary Art, and supported by the Wollongong Image Campaign.

Header image: Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner?, 2000, exhibition view
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Ying Guo, Untitled, 1998, watercolour on paper.
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Jiyang Jin, Dao-Yi and Huai-Rang, 1997, oil on canvas; Dong Wan Fan, Decendants #2 – Black Shadows, 1996, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, Courtesy of the University of Wollongong Art Collection; Lan Wang, Chinese Opera Stories No. 5, 1996, synthetic polymer paint on paper; Aaron Seeto, This Little Piggy Went to Market, 1999, Type C photograph; Aaron Seeto, TStill Life with Fishmonger, 1999, Type C photograph.
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Jaiwei Shen, Standing on Guard for our great Motherland, 1974, oil on canvas; Laurens Tan, Mars Cafe, 2000, perspex; Laurens Tan, Cafe Curtains, 1999, photograph on perspex in aluminium backlit display.
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L-R: Tiffany Lee-Shoy, Untitled, 1999, hand stitched cheong-sam, Chinese embroidered satin, lurex thread, huaniu satin binding, willow pattern china, digitally printed tracing paper and banana lollies; Montri Muenouy, In Remembrance of, 1993, B+W photograph; Ngoc Tran, Untitled, 1999, wax and oil paint on velvet jewellery box; Tom Dion, Barney, 1993, silver gelatin print; Tom Dion, Ernie, 1993, silver gelatin print; Tom Dion, Watches, 1999, wood, glass, velvet, pins, watches, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive; Tom Dion, The Dion Family, photo taken 1919, resin coated print, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive; Tom Dion, Bus Mirror, circa 1940, mirrored glass and wood, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive; Tom Dion, Uncle Tom, 1994, silver gelatin print, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive; Tom Dion, Alma, 1993, silver gelatin print, On loan from the Charles Dion Archive.
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Aaron Seeto, This Little Piggy Went to Market, 1999, Type C photograph; Aaron Seeto, TStill Life with Fishmonger, 1999, Type C photograph; Aaron Seeto, Butcher, Undercover Markets, Hong Kong, 1999, Type C photograph.
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Jiyang Jin, Dao-Yi and Huai-Rang, 1997, oil on canvas; Jiyang Jin, Lohans, 1999, oil on canvas; Jiyang Jin, Lohans, 1999, oil on canvas; Jiyang Jin, Dan-Xia and Da-Yu, 1997, oil on canvas; Savanhdray Vongpoothorn, Light Kasina, 1995, fibre washers and synthetic polymer paste on canvas; Savanhdray Vongpoothorn, Rain, 1998, synthetic polymer paint on perforated canvas; Tiffany Lee-Shoy, Untitled, 1999, hand stitched cheong-sam, Chinese embroidered satin, lurex thread, huaniu satin binding, willow pattern china, digitally printed tracing paper and banana lollies.
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Lan Wang, Chinese Opera Stories No. 5, 1996, synthetic polymer paint on paper; Lan Wang, Chinese Ancient Figures No. 5, 1996, synthetic polymer paint on paper; Lan Wang, Spring Ox (Red Chinese Characters), 1997, synthetic polymer paint on paper.
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Laurens Tan, Mars Cafe, 2000, perspex; Laurens Tan, Cafe Curtains, 1999, photograph on perspex in aluminium backlit display.
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Savanhdray Vongpoothorn, Light Kasina, 1995, fibre washers and synthetic polymer paste on canvas; Savanhdray Vongpoothorn, Rain, 1998, synthetic polymer paint on perforated canvas.

 

Mandy Ridley: Chinatown Souvenirs (On Not Knowing)

2 – 26 August 2000

Mandy Ridley is an artist based in Queensland, whose exhibition Chinatown Souvenirs (On Not Knowing) delicately replicates original handcrafted objects and garments found in the Chinatowns of Brisbane and Sydney. Utilising decorative and found tourist objects, Ridley, as a non-Asian woman, recreates these objects at a greater scale and with greater intensity of colours. These richly crafted objects attempt to understand the complex layers of our multicultural society through an exploration of appropriation and cultural authenticity.

Felicia Kan: Different Fields Different Skies

7 June – 1 July 2000.

Landscape photographer Felicia Kan’s works reflect the sublime beauty of the Australian and New Zealand landscape. The large-scale photographs are minimal yet sensual: empty fields, calm seas, cloud formations.

Felicia Kan: Different Fields Different Skies is an official satellite exhibition of the 12th Biennale of Sydney: Biennale of Sydney 2000

Header image: Felicia Kan: Different Fields Different Skies, 2000, installation view

 

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Felicia Kan, Different Fields Different Skies, 2000, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

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Felicia Kan, Ocean no.1, 2, 3, 1998, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium.

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Felicia Kan, Different Fields Different Skies, 2000, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Artshadows

Felicia Kan, Shallows, 1998, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium.installation-view

Felicia Kan, Sky no.1-8, 2000, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium.

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Felicia Kan, Field no. 1, 1996, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium; Field no. 12, 2000, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium; Untitled (field), 1994, C-type photograph mounted on aluminium.

Marine Ky: Prey (Pray)

5 – 29 July 2000

Marine Ky explores the recent history of Cambodia and how it relates to her own history of displacement, through an installation which utilises a combination of printmaking techniques and textiles. In her ephemeral installation Prey (Pray), Ky suspends sack-like forms amongst images from the Cambodian Genocide Tuol Sleng Image Database held by the University of New South Wales and Yale University, USA, to create a space which contemplates how memory distorts and refabricates.

Greg Leong Kwok-Keung: Remembering Chinese

5 – 29 July 2000

Greg Leong Kwok-Keung is an artist based in Tasmania, whose exhibition Remembering Chinese consists of lavishly decorated Chinese costumes and textiles based upon traditional designs and motifs. Utilising the symbolism of the dragon and ‘Double Happiness’, these richly crafted objects and textiles attempt to reclaim and understand the rich layers of Leong’s cultural heritage as well as to recontextualise the traditional within the contemporary.

 

Cherine Fahd: Operation Nose Nose Operation

10 May – 3 June 2000

Cherine Fahd explores the changing face of Australia in a direct and humourous manner. Operation Nose Nose Operation is a quirky performance-based photographic installation which invokes both fashion and identity through the large and quite dominant noses of Arabic and Mediterranean people. In search of noses to cast, Fahd has taken Operation Nose Nose Operation to the local high schools, universities, pubs and bars of Beirut, Lebanon, casting and bandaging unwary participants’ noses with an almost surgical precision.

Operation Nose Nose Operation is part of an international project titled Sydney/Beirut – Beirut/Sydney.

Operation Nose Nose Operation is an official event of the Mercedes Australian Fashion Week Festival.

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Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation, installation view, 2000, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

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Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation, installation view, 2000, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

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L-R: Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Nathalie), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Khalo Maurice Azouri), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Cisi), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Sylvana), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Andre Azouri), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Nathalie’s Friend), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Cherril), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. All images courtesy the artist.

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Left to right from top: Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (unknown), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Ziko), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Najib), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Fulvio), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Fuzzy Wuzzy), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Marwan), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Helen), 1999-2000, colour prints, 51 x 60 cm. All images courtesy the artist.
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L-R: Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Mireille + Pauline), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Noriko), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (unknown), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. All images courtesy the artist.
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Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Noriko), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. 

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Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (unknown), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.
Header image: Cherine Fahd, Operation Nose Nose Operation (Jido + Teta), 1999-2000, colour prints, 74 x 50 cm. Courtesy the Artist.

 

William Yang: The Australian Chinese

10 May – 3 June 2000

William Yang is one of Australia’s best known photographers, whose photographs and monologues draw upon his Chinese heritage and Asian-Australian experiences to explore an ever changing Australian Identity. The Australian Chinese is Yang’s first photographic exhibition which explores the lives and stories of Chinese migrants in Australia.

Skulls and Solicitors

 12 April – 6 May 2000

Curator: Melissa Chiu
Artists: Michael Dagostino and David Griggs

Michael Dagostino and David Griggs’ exhibition Skulls and Solicitors is a collaboration which addresses the question of what happens when the “Australian dream” goes wrong? What becomes of the dreamer? What becomes of the dream? Dagostino and Griggs’ photographic and mixed media installation tells a story of abandonment, survival and economic struggle through images of empty buildings and empty billboards.

Michael Dagostino and David Griggs are both Sydney based artists who have participated in exhibitions at First Draft, 151 Regent Street and were both included in the 1997 Australian Perspecta at the Casula Power House.

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David Griggs, Without Knowing Which Way is North, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

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David Griggs, Without Knowing Which Way is North, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

Header image: David Griggs, The Swarm, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

Harriet Parsons: Domestic Science: Planework

12 April – 6 May 2000

Harriet Parsons is a young Melbourne-based artist whose exhibition Domestic Science: Planework, consists of sensual sculptures constructed from satin, wire and muslin. These beautiful and whimsical objects, based on natural forms such as single cell organisms, are suspended so that they float throughout the gallery space. In previous works, Parsons has embroidered intricate animal and skeleton shapes with the artists’ own hair. This exhibition continues her exploration of the beauty of scientific representations.