Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu

 SYDNEY.  27 OCTOBER  – 10 DECEMBER 2017.

Artists:
Sir Joseph Banks
Daniel Boyd
Newell Harry
Fiona Pardington
Michael Parekowhai
James Tylor

Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu examines how artists disturb the past by reframing and reworking the mythologies of nationhood. Focusing on the legacies of British imperialism in the South Pacific, the works presented in this exhibition offer a counterpoint to historical narratives that have emerged within colonial modes of scientific categorisation.

The voyage of the HMS Endeavour from 1768–1771, led by the then little known Lieutenant James Cook with botanist Joseph Banks, collected a staggering quantity of plant life from across the Asia Pacific – approximately 30,000 specimens from Australia and New Zealand alone, representing over 3,000 species, of which 1,400 were wholly new to science.[1]

The scale of this taxonomy, the science of naming and defining plant and animal life was, for these pioneers, without precedent and in many cases they created unstable, even flawed, systems of vocabulary, hierarchies and methods to describe this ‘new world’. [2]

Many of these instances outlast them to this day, for example, Cook named the ‘Kangaroo’ phonetically after ‘gangurru’, the term used by Aboriginal people on the North-East coast for local, large, grey marsupials. [3] Had Cook realised the plurality of Aboriginal language and that this word was foreign to most Indigenous people in Australia, the outcome could have been very different.[4] Nevertheless, examples like this set the template for generations of legends and myths.

The Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu draws upon these conflicting (and occasionally confounding) myths. By investigating and subverting colonial prejudices inherent in the formulation of language and conceptions of nature, the artists provide new frameworks and connections, enabling us to recognise the world anew.

A selection of archival and recent works from artists Sir Joseph Banks (United Kingdom), Daniel Boyd (Australia), Newell Harry (Australia), Fiona Pardington (New Zealand), Michael Parekowhai (New Zealand) and James Tylor (Australia) is brought together for this exhibition – inclusive of a series of Banks’ copperplate etchings of Australian botanical illustration rarely seen in a contemporary exhibition context. This exhibition continues 4A’s series of exhibition projects that examine the shared histories and ties between Australia and our Asia-Pacific neighbours.

 

About the artists:

Sir Joseph Banks

b. 1743, London, England d. 1820, London, England

Sir Joseph Banks, 1st Baronet, GBC, PRS was a highly decorated British naturalist and botanist that made a number of significant contributions towards the natural sciences. Following his election as President of the Royal Society, he and collaborators boarded the HMS Endeavour, James Cook’s first great voyage of Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia and the Pacifc. During this trip, he and his team collected over 30 000 specimens from Australia and New Zealand alone, representing 3 000 species, of which 1400 were wholly new to science. Illustrator Sydney Parkinson documented these specimens. Through this momentous trip, he would become a de-facto ambassador for Australia as a destination for botanic research during England’s colonial project. Upon his return to England, Banks and lifelong collaborator, Daniel Solander oversaw an encyclopedic engravings of plant life using the illustrations by Sydney Parkinson. These were printed in black ink, and then in colour ink almost 200 years after Bank’s death.

Daniel Boyd

Kudjila/Gangalu b. 1982, Cairns, Australia lives and works in Sydney, Australia

Daniel Boyd is internationally recognised for his contemporary history paintings that interrogate Eurocentric perspectives of Australian colonial history. His technique borrows from Central Australian Aboriginal dot paintings and Impressionist pointillism, imbuing colonial scenes and ancestral figures with an affecting sense of intrigue, memorialisation and loss. His recent exhibitions include: Bitter Sweet, Cairns Art Gallery, Cairns, Australia (2017); All the World’s Futures, 56th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2015); Moscow International Biennale for Young Arts: A Time for Dreams, Moscow, Russia (2014); Bungaree: The First Australian, Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery, Lake Macquarie, Australia (2013); The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2012); One Caption Hides Another, Bétonsalon, Paris, France (2011); We Call Them Pirates Out Here, MCA, Sydney, Australia (2010); Contemporary Australia: Optimism, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2008); and Culture Warriors: National Indigenous Art Triennial, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia (2007). Boyd’s work are held in the collections of the Natural History Museum, London, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, Australia; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia and Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Newell Harry

b. 1972, Sydney, Australia lives and works in Sydney, Australia

Newell Harry’s practice encompasses a wide range of processes, media and installations that feature cultural references drawn from his travels – from Australia’s eastern seaboard, to the Vanauato archipelago, India, north-east Asia and his ancestral home of Capetown, South Africa. His works consider the legacies of the colonial project on native language, culture, politics and economies throughout these regions. His recent exhibitions include: Tidalectics, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art 21, Autgarten, Vienna, Austria (2017); Sonnant et trebuchant, Les Abattoirs, Musee FRAC Occitan, Toulouse, France (2017); Grounded, National Art School Gallery, Sydney, Australia (2017); Sugar Spin: You, Me, Art and Everything Else, Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2016); Tarrawarra Biennial of Australian Art, Tarrawarra Museum of Art, TarraWarra, Australia (2016); All the World’s Futures56th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2015) and (Untitled) 12th Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul, Turkey (2012). Harry’s works are held in the collections of Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia; Newcastle Art Gallery, Sydney, Australia; Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia and Monash University Art Collection, Melbourne, Australia.

Fiona Pardington

b. 1961, Auckland, New Zealand lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand

Fiona Pardington photographic practice delves deep into the world of public and private collections. Using the still life format Pardington has photographed museum objects, particularly ‘taonga’, objects sacred to Maori culture. She often presents these treasures alongside a tableau of native flora and fauna, and found objects – creating unique portraits of historical and contemporary Maori, New Zealand and pacific culture. Her recent exhibitions include: A Beautiful Hesitation, City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand; Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki, Auckland, New Zealand; Christchurch Art Gallery,Christchurch New Zealand (2015-16); In My Dreaming I Saw – Moea Iho Nei I Au, Suite, Wellington, New Zealand, (2015); lux et tenebris Momentum Worldwide, Berlin, Germany (2014); Supernatural, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, Australia (2014) and The Pressure of Sunlight Falling, Govett-Brewster Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand (2011). Pardington’s works are held in the collections of Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, France; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada; National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C, USA; Queensland Art Gallery I Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia; Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, New Zealand; Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand and Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney, Australia.

Michael Parekowhai

b. 1968, Wellington, New Zealand lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand

Michael Parekowhai carefully dissects Maori identity politics, culture and history through his layered art making that warps references and allusions to art history, personal memories, grand-narratives of nationhood and popular culture. Through lustrous photographs, sculpture and installation, he reinvents these imagery and material, creating quirky parables that invite open interpretation and intrigue. His recent exhibitions include: The English Channel, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2017); Soft Core, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, Sydney, Australia (2016); Michael Parekowhai: The Promised Land, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2015); Menagerie, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), Melbourne, Australia (2014); On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer, Christchurch Art Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand (2013); Peripheral Relations; Marcel Duchamp and New Zealand Art 1960-2011, Adam Art Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand (2012) and On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer, Palazzo Loredan Dell’Ambasciatore, Dorsoduro, Venice (representing New Zealand), 54th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2011). Parekowhai’s work is held in the collections of Musee Du Quai Branly, Paris, France; Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand; Te Papa Tongarewa, Museum of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia and Arario Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea.

James Tylor

Nunga (Kaurna) and Maori (Te Arawa). b. 1986 Mildura, Australia lives and works in Adelaide, Australia

James Tylor examines cultural identity in Australian contemporary culture. Using the lens of his multi-cultural heritage, which comprises Nunga (Kaurna), Māori (Te Arawa) and European (English, Scottish, Irish, Dutch, Iberian and Norwegian) Australian ancestry, he experiments with range of historical and experimental photographic processes, to examine 19th century Australian history and its legacy on identity in Australia. His recent exhibitions include: Resolution: New Indigenous Photomedia, Shepparton Art Museum, Shepparton, Australia (2017); The witching hour, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, Australia (2017); Ramsay Art Prize Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia (2017, finalist); New Matter: Recent forms of Photographs, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (2016); Endless Circulation: TarraWarra Biennial, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Healesville, Australia (2016) and Territorial Encounters, Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia (2016). Tylor’s works are held in the collections of Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.


[1] P. J. Hatfield., The Material History of the Endeavour in Chambers, N. (ed.), Endeavouring Banks (London: Paul Holberton Publishing, 2016).

[2] M. Hetherington and H. Morphy, Footprints in the Sand: Banks’s Maori collection, Cook’s first voyage 1768-71 (Canberra: National Museum of Australia, 2009).

[3] R. Cilento, 1971, Sir Joseph Banks, F.R.S., and the Naming of the Kangaroo, Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, 26, pp. 157 -161 and H. Parsons, British-Tahitian collaborative drawing strategies on Cook’s Endeavour voyage in Shino Konishi, Maria Nugent and Tiffany Shellam (ed.), Indigenous Intermediaries: new perspectives on exploration archives (Canberra: Australia National University Press, 2015).

[4] Ibid.

 

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

 

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Foreground: Michael Parekowhai, The Moment of Cubism & Nude Descending a Staircase 2009, hand-finished bronze, patina.
Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney. 
Background: Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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L – R: Michael Parekowhai (from the series ‘Beverly Hills Gun Club’), Alex Hamilton, Dave Douglas, J.D. Jones, 2004, 
s
parrow, two pot paint, aluminium, 78 x 13 x 10 cm eachCourtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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Foreground: Daniel Boyd, Decomissioned skull boxes, Natural History Museum, London, 2013.
Background: Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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L – R: Fiona Pardington, Still Life with Freud and Puriri, 2012, pigment inks on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag, 82.5 x 110 cm. Fiona Pardington,
Captive Female Huia, 2017, pigment inks on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag, 110 x 146 cm. With thanks Te Manawa Museum, New Zealand.
Courtesy the artist and Starkwhite, Auckland.

 

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L – R: Daniel Boyd, King No Beard, 2008, oil on linen, 167 x 122 cm. Collection, Clinton Ng. Daniel Boyd, Sir No Beard, 2009, oil
on canvas, 153 x 137.5 cm. Courtesy the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney and STATION, Melbourne.

 

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L – R: Sir Joseph Banks, Florilegium: Plate 63 (edition 100/100), 1980 – 1990, copperplate engraving. Sir Joseph Banks, Florilegium:
Plate 57
(edition 100/100). 1980 – 1990, copperplate engraving. Courtesy Angela Tandori Fine Art, Melbourne. James Tylor, Terra
Botanica I (Eucalyptus gracilis), Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon)
Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon II), Terra
Botanica I (Grevillea banksii), Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), Terra Botanica II (Agathis-australis), Terra Botanica
II (Banksia ericifolia), Terra Botanica II (Ipomoea batatas I, Kūmara), Terra Botanica II (Metrosideros-excelsa, Pohutukawa)
,
2015, becquerel daguerreotype, various dimensions. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne.

 

 

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L – R: James Tylor, Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), 2015, becquerel daguerreotype, 28 x 23 cm. James Tylor, Terra
Botanica II (Agathis-australis)
, 2015, becquerel daguerreotype, 14 x 11 cm. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne. 

 

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Installation view, Not Niwe, Not Nieuw, Not Neu, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2017.

 

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Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: WHITE WHINE, 2010, neon. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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L – R: Michael Parekowhai (from the series ‘Beverly Hills Gun Club’), John Taffin, Alex Hamilton, Dave Douglas, J.D. Jones, 2004, 
s
parrow, two pot paint, aluminium, 78 x 13 x 10 cm eachCourtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.

 

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James Tylor, Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus gracilis), Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon)Terra Botanica I (Eucalyptus-leucoxylon II),
Terra Botanica I (Grevillea banksii), Terra Botanica I (Pennisetum-alopecuroides), Terra Botanica II (Agathis-australis), Terra Botanica
II (Banksia ericifolia), Terra Botanica II (Ipomoea batatas I, Kūmara), Terra Botanica II (Metrosideros-excelsa, Pohutukawa)
, 2015,

becquerel daguerreotype, various dimensions. Courtesy the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne.

 

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Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: WHITE WHINE, 2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5 cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: LEVEL ROTOR,
2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5 cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s in the Round: AVID DIVA, 2010, neon, 135 x 110 x 5cm. Newell Harry, Circle/s
in the Round: MALAYALAM RACECAR,
2010, neon, 135 x 175 x 5 cm.

I don’t want to be there when it happens

PERTH. 11 NOVEMBER – 24 DECEMBER

Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts

Raqs Media Collective
Reena Saini Kallat
Raj Kumar
Sonia Leber & David Chesworth
Mithu Sen
Adeela Suleman
Abdullah M I Syed

Starting from the fragile and complex socio-political relationship between India and Pakistan in the era of contemporary warfare, I don’t want to be there when it happens investigates, in a broader sense, the psychology of trauma.

The artists invited to participate in this exhibition reference unpleasant situations; from their own everyday experience of the contradictions and problems they face in their personal universe to the alarming signals of the profound existential unease of our age.

I don’t want to be there when it happens explores the relationship between art practice and trauma, loss and grief. It is an examination of what art can contribute in the aftermath of such experiences, of how it can produce meaning and discourse through the act of engagement.

The exhibition is organised as partnership between the Perth Institute for Contemporary Arts(PICA) and 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art and expanded on the occasion of its presentation at PICA. The original exhibition was held at 4A between August and October.

Adeela Suleman’s work to be shown in I don’t want to be there when it happens has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and The Keir Foundation.

Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition

Presented as part of Sydney Contemporary – 7 – 10 September 2017 

Is there something truly universal nowadays, when human conception about value has been influenced by many factors and layered dimensions? What is more valuable when all of this factors and dimensions are detached? The answer then refers to “time”. Hahan observes that human’s process, actions, opportunities, predictions, and hopes cannot be separated from time.

Join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Hahan at Sydney Contemporary 2017 for your chance to become part of an experimental art market in Speculative Entertainment No. 1 Sydney Edition.

Speculative Entertainment No.1” is an ongoing project that developed from Hahan’s experiments about time and privilege, as well as an interest to experiment with the art market and use it as medium. This work is intended to hack the art market, and particularly to hack the artwork collecting system which usually limited. This work was initially exhibited during ARTJOG 9 (2016), an annual artist-based art fair in Yogyakarta, and has also been presented in conjunction with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian art at Art Central Hong Kong (2017).

This work consists of a 7.5 m x 2.6 m painting which is divided into 1,619 square lots. Each lot is sized 10 cm square and the price for each lot is twice the entrance fee of the art fair. During the exhibition period at scheduled time, the audience can become “collectors” with the same opportunities, hopes, privileges, and speculations by choosing any lot they want at the venue. The audience members who purchase the lot(s) are encouraged to speculate by re-selling it according to their own speculative price and Hahan, as the artist, will charge 10% commission from the selling.

 

About the artist:

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan (1983, Kebumen, Indonesia) lives and works in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. Hahan’s art making is concerned with the tussle between ‘high art’ and ‘low art’, blurring realism with decoration. Hahan incorporates film, music and street culture into a distinct visual language, creating a sense of movement and spontaneity in what can be described as a topsy-turvy reality steeped in satirical humor. In recent years, he attempts to display an art with the concept that emphasises the interaction with the visitors and relate it with the development of art in global as well as its society. He also one of the founders of Ace House Collective, a young artists’ collective and initiative space based in Yogyakarta which trying to capture the culture of Indonesian contemporary society through multidiscipline work process, collaboration, and research.His works have been collected by several art museum including Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) Brisbane, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Melbourne, Australia.

 

Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Project 11. 4A would like to thank Project 11 for their generous support of this project.

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Documentation:

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Speculative Entertainment No.1 Sydney Edition (performance documentation), Sydney
Contemporary Art Fair 2017, Carriageworks, Sydney.

 

DACCHI DANG: AN OMEN NEAR AND FAR

SYDNEY. 9 JUNE – 30 JULY 2017.

Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far is the first survey exhibition of one of the preeminent Vietnamese-Australian artists working today. Presenting a selection of works spanning three decades by a founding artist member of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Dacchi Dang is principally concerned with articulating the complex nature of diasporic experience and an ongoing redefinition of ideas of place and of home. With a focus on the artist’s work across photography, printmaking, video and installation, An Omen Near and Far signals the central importance of art in coming to terms with the contingencies of the past and of the present.

Born in Saigon and having experienced the latter years of the Vietnam War before fleeing his homeland on a boat to be eventually accepted as a refugee in Australia, Dacchi Dang’s life and art is deeply informed by this trauma, loss and an ongoing search for belonging. An Omen Near and Far unveils a new installation work commissioned by 4A that employs photography and wax that burns and melts over the duration of the exhibition. Informed by a recent 2017 trip to Vietnam, this new work is conceptually connected to an earlier, ephemeral sculpture and performance originally staged as Upstairs/downstairs at Sydney’s National Art School in 1994. This latter work – ghostly documentation of which is included in the survey – saw Dang burn a wax sculpture imprinted with photographic imagery recorded by the artist in Vietnam in that same year, his first visit to his country of birth since arriving in Australia in 1982.

Dacchi Dang’s dislocating experience of returning to Cholon, Saigon’s Chinese district and where he grew up, and extended family members in Bến Tre province in the Mekong Delta, prompted him to photograph the people and landscapes of Vietnam voraciously. Having shot over 100 rolls of black-and-white film on his Hasselblad, Dang’s photographic archive of daily life in urban and rural Vietnam documents a time concurrent with the momentous historic occasion of the lifting of the trade embargo between the U.S. and the Republic of Vietnam that had been in place since the end of military conflict in 1975. Dang’s source imagery – now a time capsule of the developing nation in flux– resulted in a highly productive period of experimentation. Spectacle I (1996) and Spectacle II (1996), a suite of monochromatic photogravure prints and their corresponding gold plates, present intimate portraits of ordinary Vietnamese and montaged street scenes tempered by an uneasy balance between empathy and distance.

In addition to series of works over the past decades that explore landscapes as colonised and contested forms of cultural memory, from Paris to Peel Island in Queensland’s Moreton Bay, An Omen Near and Far offers a selection of historical material from the archives of both the artist and 4A: photographic proof sheets, exhibition ephemera, reviews, interviews and critical texts. This includes documentation of Dang’s seminal solo exhibition, The Boat, presented at 4A in 2001, a milestone in the development of wider public reception and understanding of art from Asian-Australian perspectives. The Boat garnered strong community responses, opening up dialogue by addressing the profound perils of seeking asylum while prompting a critical consideration of Australia’s changing treatment of refugees.

Accompanying the exhibition, 4A will host a panel discussion that will offer insights into the historical research and creative development currently being undertaken by Dacchi Dang for the Australian War Memorial’s Gillespie Bequest commission of a new body of work due for completion over 2017–2018. Exploring the experiences of Australian and Vietnamese–Australians military veterans of the Vietnam War, and engaging with the Memorial’s extensive collection and archives, Dang’s commission represents the first such instance to form part of the national institution’s art collection.

 

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Dacchi Dang
 (b. Saigon, Vietnam, 1966) is an artist who lives and works in Sydney. He is a founding artist member of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dang was born to a Chinese father and Vietnamese mother, and at the age of sixteen fled Vietnam with his brother and sister on a fishing boat. After a traumatic sea voyage the boat arrived on Malaysian shores where Dang was transported to the refugee camp of Pulau Bidong. Following nine months at the camp, he was transported to Kuala Lumpur where he was accepted as a Vietnamese refugee by Australia in late 1982.

Dacchi Dang works primarily with photography and printmaking, in various forms and processes, and also video and installation. His work has been exhibited in Australia and internationally since the early 1990s. Solo exhibitions include Full Circle (2009), Metro Arts Gallery, Brisbane; Liminal (2006-2008), Horsham Regional Art Gallery, Victoria; Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne; and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney; Spectacle I (1996), Firstdraft Gallery, Sydney; Spectacle II, Stills Gallery, Sydney. Group exhibitions include DDESSIN [14] (2014), Paris Contemporary Drawing Fair, Atelier Richelieu; Crossing Boundaries (2014), Sydney Town Hall; Edge of Elsewhere (2010-2012), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney; Planet Ueno (2008); Taito Community Museum, Tokyo; Re-StArt (2008), 733 Art Factory, Chengdu; and News From Islands (2007), Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney.

He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (1991) and a Master of Arts (1996) from the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales, Sydney; Graduate Diploma in Archives and Records Management (2000) and Graduate Certificate of Applied Science in Cultural Heritage Studies specialising in Photography (2003) from University of Canberra; and a Doctor of Philosophy (Fine Arts) from Queensland College of the Arts, Griffith University, Brisbane (2013). Dang has undertaken numerous artist in residence programs including at Bundanon Trust (2001), Hill End (2001); Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris (2003) and Tokyo University of the Arts Geidai (2008). His work is held in public and private collections in Australia, France, China and Hong Kong. Over 2015-2018 Dang is producing new works commissioned by the Australian War Memorial Gillespie Bequest that explore the wartime experience of Vietnamese–Australians and its legacy today.


Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.
‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

Dacchi Dang, Liminal, (2005) installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Dacchi Dang, Liminal, (2005) installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Dacchi Dang: Artist book, 2001. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Dacchi Dang: Artist book, 2001, cyanotype on paper, bound with hand-stitch, 35 pages. Courtesy the artist and Bundanon Trust
collection, New South Wales.

 

Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Clockwise from left: Daachi Dang, Spectacle I (1996); Daachi Dang, Untitled (from the series Spectacle II) (1996). Installation view, all works courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Clockwise from left: Daachi Dang, Spectacle I, 1996, gold plates. Courtesy the artist; Daachi Dang, Untitled (from the series
Spectacle II),
1996, photogravure. Courtesy the artist and Horsham Regional Art Gallery Collection, Victoria, purchased through
the Horsham Art Gallery
Trust Fund with assistance from the Victorian Public Galleries Foundation, 1998.

 

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

‘Dacchi Dang: An Omen Near and Far’ installation view, 4A Centre For Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artists.

 

Dacchi Dang, Et in Arcadia Ego, 2017, installation with wax, photographs, bamboo leaves commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

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Three images above – Exhibition Opening, 9 June 2017. Performance stills: Dacchi Dang, Et in Arcadia Ego, 2017, installation
with wax, photographs, bamboo leaves, commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and assisted by the Australian
Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. Courtesy the artist.

Progress: The Game of Leaders – 4A x Melbourne Festival

OCT 4 – 15 – MPavilion as part of Melbourne Festival

Program venue:
MPavilion
Queen Victoria Gardens, St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC 3004

 

  • Progress: The Game of Leaders can be played:
    Wednesday 4 October – 9AM – 12PM
    Daily, Thursday 5 October – Sunday 15 October – 9AM – 4PM

 

Where will you be standing when the First World falls?

Like a giant round of Jenga with Western civilisation as the stakes, Progress: The Game of Leaders invites you to take on the role of building a country. What blocks will you favour: economic progress or military spending? Higher standards of living or increasing globalisation? As players jockey for top position in the imaginary nation’s guidance, the structure grows more precarious and its foundations grow ever more compromised. The game can only end one way.

Singaporean artist Sam Lo’s Progress: The Game of Leaders is a playful and interactive allegory that asks what is put in peril by the unfettered progress of the First World, and is a refreshing take on world politics for a time that sorely needs it.

Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art as part of Melbourne Festival 2017.

 

About the artist:

Sam Lo (b. 1986), also known by the moniker SKL0, is a Singaporean contemporary artist whose work is heavily inspired by daily observations and research on the sociopolitical climate from which she executes through visual commentary comprising of text and imagery. The end results birth new meanings, lent to existing situations by incorporating ideas, messages and emotions with familiar visual codes into urban situations in hopes of creating experiences to invoke critical thought on the viewer’s everyday life. 

Exhibitions include solo shows at One East Asia Gallery (Singapore, 2017) and at The Substation (Singapore, 2015), as well as showcases like The Affordable Art Fair (Singapore 2013) and Georgetown Festival (Penang, Malaysia 2014). The artist has also released a book titled ‘Greetings From Singapore‘ and recently completed a residency in Delhi with ST+Art Foundation involving The Singapore High Commission and Singapore Tourism Board.

Sam is also founder of the creative platforms Project XIV and INDIGOISM.

Familiar Stranger

SYDNEY. 7 APRIL – 21 MAY 2017.

Artists: Shumon Ahmed, Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, Bashir Makhoul, Veer Munshi, Shireen Taweel and Curtis Taylor.

The reconciliation between memory and reality plagues the act of returning. There is no resolution between the two. Memories are etched into the psyche hinged on topographical monuments, whispered words and subconscious everyday patterns while reality erases such symbology through the passing of time. Familiar Stranger examines this third, non-existent space that plagues the returnee as they seek to retrace their memories in places that have been rebuilt or reinscribed. With familiarity reduced to invisible archaeological sites the returnee searches for recognition and legitimacy in a now unacquainted geography.

The exhibiting artists examine the negation and erasure of familiarity by presenting place as a space defined by uncertainty. There is a continue shift between points of view that begets the collapse of spatial certainty and becomes defined by its own instability. For the migrant the idea of returning becomes an implicit part of their identity; the constant oscillation between the possibility and impossibility of return a daily taunt. In Familiar Stranger the moment of return is the focal point where, for some, it is a wistful hope and for others a violent decimation of expectancy. Resisting melodrama, the artists turn to the familial archive and the personal memorial to bring form to the constant internal struggle between what is and what was.

 

About the artists:

Bashir Makhoul (b. 1963, Galilee, Palestine, lives and works in Birmingham, United Kingdom) is a Palestinian artist born in Galilee in 1963. He has been based in the United Kingdom for the past 22 years. During this time he has produced a body of work, based on repeated motifs, which can be characterized by their power of aesthetic seduction. Once drawn into the work however, viewers find themselves engaged with something far more complicated than a beautiful pattern. Economics, nationalism, war and torture are frequently woven into the layers of Makhoul’s work and often the more explicit the material, the more seductive the surface.

Makhoul completed his PhD in 1995 at Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK. He has exhibited his work widely in Britain and internationally, including the Hayward Gallery, London, Tate Liverpool, Harris Museum, Preston, Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, the Liverpool Biennial, Jordan National Museum, NCA Gallery Lahore Pakistan, the Florence Biennial, Haus am Lutzowplatz Berlin, UTS Gallery, Sydney, Australia, Elga Wimmer Gallery, New York, Changshu Art Museum, Suzhou Art Museum, Shenzhen Art Museum in China, 798 Yang Gallery Beijing and many others. In 2013, he  presented his work at the Venice Biennial in Italy and Aichi Biennial in Japan. He will show at the Asian Triennial in Manchester UK in 2014.

Curtis Taylor (b. Broome, Western Australia, Australia, lives and works in Perth, Australia) is a filmmaker, screen artist, actor and a young Martu leader. Growing up in remote Martu desert communities and in the city, Curtis has both traditional Martu knowledge and a non-Aboriginal education. After finishing school in 2008 Curtis worked as Community Coordinator and Youth Development Officer at Martu Media (a division of Kanyirninpa Jukurrpa), where he also spent 18 months working on the major Yiwarra Kuju: The Canning Stock Route project as a filmmaker and youth ambassador. Curtis was the recipient of the 2011 Western Australian Youth Art Award and Wesfarmers Youth Scholarship. His screen work including the acclaimed short film ‘Mamu’ has been shown in international film festivals from Brazil to Nepal. Curtis has almost completed his film and media studies at Murdoch University. He was the Director’s Attachment and is the Narrator of ‘Collisions’.

Chun Yin Rainbow Chan ( b. 1990, Hong Kong, lives and works in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is a multidisciplinary artist who works across sound, performance and installation. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Sydney, she is interested in duality, diaspora and the effects of globalisation on modern Chinese society. Chan often evokes traditional Chinese methods or styles and represents them in uncanny ways. Her research engages with the authentic and the copy, exploring sites of exchange and desire which complicate Western notions of originality and “appropriate” consumption.

Central to Chan’s work is the circulation of knock-off objects, sounds and images in global media. Her work positions the fake as a complex sign that shapes new myths, values and contemporary commodity production. Sustained by a parasitic relationship to the original, the counterfeit interacts with the world in unpredictable ways. Chan investigates how these mimetic symbols, such as bootlegs or fake luxury goods, problematise the socially-regulated impulse of consumerist desire.

Tying together her works across installation and pop music is the relationship between nostalgia, migration and identity. Since winning FBi Radio’s Northern Lights Competition in 2011, Chan has been building a reputation as one of the most innovative artists in Australia with her highly personal, experimental pop music. She recently released her debut album Spacings (Silo Arts & Records) which was met with critical acclaim, handpicked as the feature album on FBi Radio, Radio Adelaide, RTRFM and scoring 4 stars from Rolling Stone. Under her techno project, Chunyin, Chan released Code Switch EP on UK label, Off Out, in September.

Chan has performed extensively with notable performances at the Sydney Opera House, Museum of Contemporary Art, Gallery of Modern Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales and Iceland Airwaves Festival. She has exhibited works at Firstdraft Gallery, Liquid Architecture and Squiggle Space. In October 2016, she was invited by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art to participate in the inaugural Longli International New Media Arts Festival in Guizhou Province, China. Chan has collaborated with choreographer Ivey Wawn for Out of The Studio, presented by DirtyFeet, and soundtracked ABC web-series The Glass Bedroom, directed by Kate Blackmore.

Shumon Ahmed  (b. 1977, Bangladesh, lives and works in Dhaka, Bangladesh) is a Dhaka-based poet and an artist who explores the fusion between video, photography, Sound, text and performance, creating stories that while seemingly contradictory, are private yet collective. His work with the camera and film has also been likened to abstract painting due to his experimental processing techniques with unpredictable results that yield the melancholic.

Ahmed studied photography at the South Asian Media Academy, Dhaka, Bangladesh (2006- 2009) & at The Danish school of Media and Journalism, Arhus, Denmark (2008).

His work has been previously exhibited in various galleries, festivals and screenings around the world including the 2014 Kochi-Muziris Biennale, India, Dhaka Art Summit, Bangladesh (2012, 2014, 2016), Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2010), Fotomuseum, Winterthur, Switzerland (2010), Art science museum, Singapore (2016), Krinzinger Projekete, Austria (2016) and a recent solo exhibition at Project88, Mumbai, India (2015).

In April, Shumon will take part in Familiar Stranger, a group exhibition at 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney.

Veer Munshi (b. 1955, Kashmir, India, lives and works in Dehli, India), a Kashmiri artist who now lives in Delhi has consistently used his art to reflect his anguish at the situation in his home state, his pain and struggle spilling over onto his canvass. Making a human rights statement rather than a political one, he has constantly sought to highlight the turmoil that comes  with his separation from his heritage, and to highlight the increasingly the narrow space that exists for culture and art in his state. He is also convinced that art. Because of its universal nature, can play a significant role in the resolution of the Kashmir situation. Unlike other contemporary artists, though, viewing pleasure is no motivator for veer in the creation of his art,rather it is about sharing a personally-felt experience as a ‘refugee’. His paintings and installations reflect a Kashmir that is in the context of the Kashmir.

Shireen Taweel (b. 1990, Bankstown, New South Wales, Australia, lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is currently practicing at the Parramatta Artist Studios in Sydney.  Much of Taweel’s practice is informed by her identity connected to the Middle East as her heritage further inspires her creative exploration through the refined processes in metallurgy. The nature of the relationship of her forms sit in a space between jewellery and sculpture, where her techniques of making takes the traditional art of copper-smithing into a contemporary context.

The works partake in a cross-cultural discourse, while the sense of the arcane and shifted structures opens dialogue between shared histories and relations between communities of fluid identities.

Taweel is a current Kickstart Helix Next Wave participant. Her recent solo shows include fractured//fluid terrains at SEVENTH Gallery, Melbourne (2017), translated roots at Verge Gallery, Sydney (2017) tomorrow, InshAllah at 55 Sydenham RD Marrickville, Sydney (2016) rhythms of the ritualistic at Gaffa Gallery, Sydney (2016) and promised denial at 146 ArtSpace, Hobart (2016).  Taweel is also a nominee of The Jameel Art Prize (2018) at Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

 

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

 

Left: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Bashir Makhoul, Wounds, 2007 – 2008, lenticular print,
400 x 200cm. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography. Right: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian
Art: Veer Munshi, Leaves like hands of flame, 2010 – 2012, two channel video, 5: 32. Courtesy the artist and Latitude 28, New
Delhi, India.


Left: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shumon Ahmed, What I have forgotten could fill an ocean,
what is not real never lived, 2013, polaroid photographs, analogue phone set, original sarod score composed by Yusuf Khan and
poetry recited by Nader Salam, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist, Samdani Art Foundation, Dhaka, Bangladesh &
Project88, Mumbai, India. Image: Document Photography Right: Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:
Bashir Makhoul, Wounds, 2007 – 2008, lenticular print, 400 x 200cm. Courtesy the artist.


Installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shumon Ahmed, What I have forgotten could fill an ocean, what is
not real never lived, 2013, polaroid photographs, analogue phone set, original sarod score composed by Yusuf Khan and poetry
recited by Nader Salam, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist, Samdani Art Foundation, Dhaka, Bangladesh & Project88,
Mumbai, India.


Right: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Shireen Taweel, Al Nahas, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm.
Courtesy the artist. Shireen Taweel, Al Nahas, 2015, etched copper, 100 x 90 x 40. Courtesy the artist. Left: Installation view,
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Curtis Taylor works as below. Curtis Taylor, Karlaya, 2014, video, 23 seconds.
Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marlu, 2014, video, 42 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marrka Marrka – Mirage, 2017,
red dirt and animated projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Parnajarrpa, 2014, video, 29 seconds.
Courtesy the artist.


a4-april-web-33

Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art: Chun Yin Rainbow Chan (陳雋然), To enclose one’s mouth, 2017, ink,
silk, wood, video loop, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist.


Left: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Curtis Taylor works as below. Curtis Taylor, Karlaya, 2014,
video, 23 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marlu, 2014, video, 42 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Marrka
Marrka – Mirage, 2017, red dirt and animated projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Curtis Taylor, Parnajarrpa,
2014, video, 29 seconds. Courtesy the artist. Image, Document Photography. Right: Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary
Asian Art: Shireen Taweel, Dome, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm. Courtesy the artist. Image, Document Photography. And
Shireen Taweel, Sophia, 2015, etched copper, 90 x 40 x 30 cm. Courtesy the artist.

He Xiangyu’s The Swim – Premiere Australian Screenings

SYDNEY – Free screenings: May 25 – 28 2017.

4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art is pleased to announce the Australian premiere of He Xiangyu’s latest film, The Swim

The Swim is an art film with documentary characteristics. The artist returned to his hometown in Kuandian for three times – a poor county located by Yalu River on the China-North Korea border. Through interviewing and filming 6 veterans participating in the Korean War and 6 defectors fleeing from North Korean as well as their families, the film unveils the cruel reality hidden behind the beautiful scenery and presents the utopian fantasy projected on individuals.

This will be only the second international screening of this work (after an international premiere at the Guggenheim in February 2017).

He Xiangyu is a leading contemporary artist based between Beijing and Berlin who first garnered attention for his large-scale works, such as The Coca Cola Project and Tank Project. Xiangyu is represented by White Cube and his work is in the collections of:Rubell Family Collection, Miami, USA; Kunstmuseum Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Pinault Collection, France; White Rabbit Gallery, Sydney, Australia; Domus Collection, USA; Boros Collection, Berlin, Germany; Long Museum, Shanghai, China; Mercator Foundation, Essen, Germany; Artron Art Museum, Shenzhen, China; M WOODS Museum, Beijing, China; Sishang Museum, Beijing, China.

 

Director’s Statement:

On the Tomb-sweeping Day in 2015, I went back to my hometown for ancestor worship. In China, it is a day when we mourn the deceased and wish them living a happy life in the other world. My hometown is a border town where I was born and grew up. I used to know well about the neighbours and the landscape. But after leaving for years, I found the landscape that seemed familiar and everlasting before had concealed certain strange reality now. The Utopia in my carefree childhood makes me feel complicated and ambiguous, which inspires me to rediscover the place and the people’s life there.

I spent more than half a year on field trips and collected a large amount of materials. The interviewees include a dozen North Korean defectors and over twenty veterans participating in the Korean War. Their narrations unveil the realistic face of my hometown. Following my childhood memory and local people’s narrations, I started my first filming in this April along the border between China and North Korea. Later, I went back twice. During the three filming trips, the experiences of the individual interviewees, their struggle in reality and their expectation for the future were so fascinating and touching. Although have gone through the geographical and spiritual departure and return, the land that used to be so familiar is still strange to me.

 

About He Xiangyu (b.1986, Dandong, China.Lives and works across Beijing, China and Berlin, Germany.)

He Xiangyu’s experimental practice can be seen as both a material testing ground and conceptual laboratory that investigates diverse personal, social and political themes. Part of a generation of Chinese artists who grew up during a period of rapid urbanisation, He Xiangyu is one of the most important and influential figures in contemporary Chinese art.  He has said that “I’m seeking to adjust and guide people’s perception through the material changes within the object”, using a range of media to reflect on philosophic ideas such as the increasing materialism and obsolescence of our society as well as the effects of the institutionalisation and commercialisation of contemporary art.

He Xiangyu is represented by White Cube and has an international reputation. His solo exhibitions have been presented in London, Frankfurt, Sydney, Tokyo and Beijing. His works are included in numerous group shows, including Soil and Stones, Souls and Songs by Kadist Art Foundation, the Biennale de
Lyon, Fire and Forget: On Violence in the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, 28 Chinese in the Asian Art Museum/ San Antonia Museum of Art in San Francisco and San Antonia, Shanghai Biennale, Busan Biennale and exhibitions in many important institutions in the world.

He Xiangyu’s works have been collected by the Uli Sigg Collection (Switzerland), Rubell Family Collection (Miami, USA), Kunstmuseum Bern (Bern, Switzerland), François Pinault Collection (France), White Rabbit Gallery (Sydney, Australia), Domus Collection (New York, USA), Boros Collection (Berlin, Germany), Long Museum (Shanghai, China), Stiftung Mercator (Essen, Germany), M Woods Gallery (Beijing, China) and the Si Shang Art Museum (Beijing, China).

 

This is the second time 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art has presented He Xiangyu in Sydney. The Swim follows the 2012 exhibition of the Cola Project – where the artist worked with factory workers to boil thousands of litres of Cola, creating a black sludge which He used to create Song dynasty style ink paintings.

For more information about the Cola Project, click here.

Image: The Swim (2017) (still) © He Xiangyu. Courtesy the artist and White Cube.

Before the Rain

SYDNEY. 21 JANUARY – 19 MARCH 2017.

Luke Ching, Liu Ding, Yuan Goang-Ming, James Kong, Tang Kwok Hin, Sarah Lai, Swing Lam, Ellen Pau and Sampson Wong.

Before the onset of a downpour there is a moment of heavy humidity that hangs low in the air. Building over time it signals the inevitability of a deluge that will interrupt and intercept patterns of normality. For Hong Kong, a city defined by humidity, the deluge that began on September 28 2014 was the result of a long and steady buildup of uncertainty, anxiety and the long held need to articulate a cohesive identity for the city.  Before the Rain addresses the tensions that precipitated the recent political and civil urgency in Hong Kong and the city’s pressing need to reimagine its future.

The exhibiting artists frame the conversation from a multiplicity of perspectives presenting the complexity and concerns of a city facing a future planned by others. They approach the city with an intent to protect it; their works may appear as warnings but they are underpinned by a need to safeguard.  Commissioned for the exhibition is a new work by Sampson Wong that transforms the entrance gallery into a narration of the Umbrella Movement. Ephemera taken from the streets, continuous loops of CCTV and news footage, blogs, tweets and newspapers will populate the gallery inviting the viewer to sift through the materials and navigate their own opinion of a city in flux. Before the Rain responds to a continuously evolving discourse, proving to be one of the most critical events in South East Asia’s recent history.

 


About the artists:

Luke Ching Chin-wai (b.1972, Hong Kong; lives in Hong Kong) is an inter-disciplinary artist creating multimedia installations in which traditional and new media coexist in an imperfect balance. His work identifies and attempts to deconstruct the changer urban landscapes of his home city as emblematic of Hong Kong’s pluralist history as one location caught between the eastern and western hemispheres. Ching has held a number of solo exhibitions including Screensaver (2014), Gallery EXIT, Hong Kong; as park of the Folk Art Series (2008), Blackburn Museum & Art Gallery, Blackburn, England; and 2 in 1 (2007), Hong Kong Visual Art Centre, Hong Kong. He has participated in group exhibitions not limited to Ceramics Show by Non-ceramics Artist (2015), 1a space, Hong Kong; The Invisible Hand: Curating as Gesture (2014), CAFAM Biennage, Beijing, China; The Problem of Asia (2010), Chalk Horse, Sydney; and the Hong Kong Art Biennial Exhibition 2005 (2005), Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong. Since completing his Master of Fine Art in 1998 at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Luke Ching has received awards both in Hong Kong and abroad while undertaking residencies internationally in the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Japan.

James Kong (b. 1985, Hong Kong; Lives and works in Hong Kong) graduated with a Bachelor of Science at the School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong. Since then, as an Interactive Media Engineer he dedicates his creative work to explore human-computer interaction and the application of multimedia techniques to theatrical environments. He also explores the possibilities of computational media in the arts. James has exhibitied at Exim Macau (2015) and the IFVA awards new media exhibition (2014).

Sarah Lai Cheuk Wah (b. 1983, Hong Kong; lives in Hong Kong) is a painter concerned with beautifying and capturing the aura of the mundane. Her subjects are often highly familiar objects or environments detached from the humdrum of everyday life, deprived of their utilitarian functions, allowing the artist to subtly abstract the concepts of form and function as relics of contemporary commodity culture. A recent Master of Fine Arts graduate from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Lai has consistently held solo exhibitions in Hong Kong including Unsettled Heart (2016), The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Kong Kong; In Stasis (2015), Art Basel Hong Kong, Para Site, Hong Kong; and Safety Island (2013), Gallery EXIT, Hong Kong. Her works are collected internationally after participating in group exhibitions internationally, such as The 2nd CAFAM Future Exhibition (2015), CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China; I submit to the wisdom of the body (2015), Silverlens Gallery, Manila, Philippines; The Hong Kong International Art Fair (2013), Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Hong Kong; and the Sovereign Art Prize (2010), ARTSPACE at Helutrans, Singapore.

Ellen Pau (b. Hong Kong; lives in Hong Kong) made her first super-8 film in 1984. Being a self-taught artist, she worked as a MTV director, cinematographer, video artist, curator, educator and arts administrator. Pau started her international career in 1995 at the Kwangiu Biennale in Korea, curated by Kim Hon-Yee and Nam-June Paik. She is the co-founder and artistic director for the media art organisation Videotage, and a member and curator of the organizing committee for the Microwave International Media Art Festival, Hong Kong since 1996. A radiographer by profession, Pau teaches part-time in Hong Kong University, Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts, as well as being a full time medical image technologist. Pau is advisor to the HK Museum of Art, the HK Art Development Council and a number of festivals.

Sampson Wong (b. 1985, Hong Kong; lives in Hong Kong) is an artist, independent curator, academic and urbanist from Hong Kong. He engages in art-making, curatorial practice, teaching, research and writing, and see them as intellectual means exploring issues about urbanism, space, power and freedom. His research interests also include politics of epidemics and Hong Kong studies. He is now writing books about plagues in Hong Kong, urbanism and art, and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement. His writings often appear in the Stand News and Mingpao (Sunday Life). Recent projects in 2016 include From 60 seconds to 2047, Countdown Machine and Land Visions: In Search of Land Art in Hong Kong. He also curated 2nd emptyscape art festival: Beyond the Village School 2016, Studio in-Situ – Assembling! 2016, and Affordable Art Basel! In 2015. He received his Ph.D in Urban Studies & Geography at the University of Manchester in 2014.

Yuan Goang-Ming (b. 1965, Taipei, Taiwan; lives in Taipei) is one of the foremost Taiwanese artists of media art, and has been a pioneer of video art in Taiwan, a medium in which he started working in 1986. In 1997, he received a Master’s degree in media art from the Academy of Design, Karlsruhe. Combining symbolic metaphors with technological media, his work eloquently expresses the state of contemporary existence and profoundly explores the human mind and consciousness. Yuan has been the recipient of many awards, including the Jury Prize of the first Art Future 2000 by the Acer Digital Art Center. His works, ranging from photographs to multi-media installations, have been exhibited worldwide, including at the Taiwan Pavilion at the 50th Venice Biennale (2003). Recent solo exhibitions include BEFORE MEMORY (2011, TKG+, Taipei), and DISAPEARINGTRACES (2011, TKG+, Beijing).

Swing Lam (b.1986, Hong Kong) specialises in various art forms, including painting, performance art, temporary architecture research and is involved in cultural and urban sketching studies. He writes arts and cultural columns for Ming Pao and Stand News amongst others. He earned a bachelor degree of Visual Arts in HKBU and a MA intercultural studies in CUHK and is one of the fotanian artists concentrated on drawing, painting and happenings. Swing started the project Flaneur 11 on 2012 spring; a project of waking across 10 cities over the world. Swing showed his project in Atelier Muji gallery as his first solo exhibition in spring 2013. RTHK also made a documentary of his work in January 2013. In 2014, he developed a facebook page to introduce and study some of the featured architecture, tools and creations found. It helped the public look into the temporary facilities from an artistic point of view. In the project Swing embraced his experience of walking through cities and his interaction with the public in this public space. Currently, Swing is working as a Lecturer in Lingnan University Community college for Art and design courses.

 

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

 

Before the Rain installation view 1

Centre: Umbrella Movement (2017), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the
artist. Image: Document Photography. 
Walls: Swing LamTemporary structure research in Umbrella Revolution 2014-2016 (2016),
installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, works on paper. Courtesy the artist.

 

4a_jan_media-7

Swing Lam, Temporary structure research in Umbrella Revolution 2014-2016 (2016), works on paper. Installation view, detail.
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Before the Rain installation view 2

Clockwise from left: Ellen Pau, Diverson (1990), single-channel video, 5:30. Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian
Art. Liu Ding, A Sentence, (2016), poem, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Sarah Lai, Rub it until it is removed
(2015) single-channel HD video, 5:40, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Sarah Lai, Polish your own shoe
as long as you can
 (2015), single-channel HD video, 11:11, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Sarah Lai,
Demarcated area (2017), performance with installation. Dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary
Asian Art. Luke Ching, 150 Lost Items (2014), mixed media, installation view. All courtesy the artists.

 

Before the Rain installation view 3

Luke Ching, 150 Lost Items (2014), mixed media, detail installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

 

Before the Rain installation view 7

Left: Yuan Goang-MingThe 561st Hour of Occupation (2014), installation view, single-channel video. Courtesy the artist.
Right: Reproduced items and image from The Umbrella Movement Visual Archive, (2014), installation view, 4A Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art.

 

Before the Rain installation view 8

Reproduction items and image from The Umbrella Movement Visual Archive, (2014), installation view (detail), 4A Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the Umbrella Movement Visual Archive.

 

Before the Rain installation view 4

Real and reproduced protest posters from The Umbrella Movement Visual Archive, (2014), installation view, detail, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the Umbrella Movement Visual Archive.

 

Before the Rain installation view 5

Sampson WongCapturing a hyperevent: artistic records of the Umbrella Movement (2017), installation view, detail, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist.

Edge In

ADC, SYDNEY. 2 FEBRUARY – 15 MARCH 2017.

To work from the edge in is to trace and place. For Annie Gobel working from the edge in reflects her childhood creative endeavors that always started with a thick, bold outline. Performed as an overture this line crafted a space in which she could experiment and create. Today this line has become an edge; as her work has lifted from the page and into sculpture the emboldened black edge has now become form. In this body of work Gobel presents her wearable sculptures in Sydney for the first time. Bounded by memories they appear in candy coloured enamel and invite recollections of play, of toys and of childhood adventures. It is memories such as these that have been intrinsic to Gobel’s process as she seeks to ensure that the inherent freedom of childhood remains a part of the adult everyday.

Nurfitria S. Gobel (Annie Gobel) (b.1991 Jakarta, Indonesia) is a Melbourne based Jeweller. She recently exhibited at the Japan International Enameling Show at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan, Hero Worship in Craft, Melbourne and 5×7 at Gallery Funaki, Melbourne, 2016. She participated in the show Colourfast Guaranteed with Marcos Guzman at Rubicon Ari Gallery Melbourne and sPin at Australian National Capital Artists Gallery’s 5th Annual Exhibition Of Miniature Wearable Artworks, ANCA Gallery, Canberra. Gobel had a solo show Re-Played at Dia.Lo.Gue Artspace, Jakarta, Indonesia in 2015. She completed her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Gold and Silversmithing at RMIT University, Melbourne in 2013 and was a Fresh! awards finalist at Craft Victoria, Melbourne. Gobel recently completed her Graduate Diploma in Arts and Cultural Management at Melbourne University in 2016.

The People’s Currency

MELBOURNE. 14 – 19 FEBRUARY 2017.

The People’s Currency is a new performance work by Melbourne-based artist Eugenia Lim. The work takes its name from Renminbi (China’s currency) and explores the social impacts of globalisation on those who seek their fortunes in the factories of China – or the ‘workshop of the world’. When almost everything is now ‘Made in China’, how are we all implicated as consumers, in the labour conditions of the production line? Dressed as a gold Mao-suited ‘ambassador’, Lim will inhabit a factory printing counterfeit currency of her own design. Presiding over the printing of money, Lim will also act as floor manager to a ‘factory’ of workers. The public is invited to enter into short-term ‘employment’ on the factory floor. In exchange for basic menial work, the ‘employee’ will be remunerated in The People’s Currency. The People’s Currency turns a site in Melbourne’s CBD into ‘Renminconn’, a closed loop ‘special economic zone’. In Lim’s project, mass-production and money-printing become strategies for contemplating the human impact of the ‘long march’ of global capitalism.

Eugenia Lim (b. 1981 Melbourne, Australia) is an Australian artist of Chinese–Singaporean descent who works across video, performance and installation. Interested in how nationalism and stereotypes are formed, Lim invents personas to explore the tensions of an individual within society – the alienation and belonging in a globalised world.

Conflations between authenticity, mimicry, natural, man-made, historical and anachronistic are important to the work. To this end, Lim finds inspiration in sites and objects that are both ‘contemporary’ and ‘out of time’, embodied and virtual. Model homes, suburban sprawl, CCTV, online chat rooms, fake food, historical parks and the Australian landscape have all featured in the work. Counterpoint to these sites, Lim has performed the identities of Japanese hikikomori; a Bowie-eyed rock star; the cannibal Issei Sagawa; a suburban beautician; Miranda from Picnic at Hanging Rock and currently, a gold Mao-suited ‘Ambassador’. This dialogue between place and performance reflects the push-pull between Australian and Asian, the mono and the multi-cultural.

Lim’s work has been exhibited internationally at venues including the Tate Modern, GOMA, ACMI, HUN Gallery NY, and FACT Liverpool. She has received a number of Australia Council for the Arts grants and residencies, including a residency at the Experimental Television Centre NY and exchange at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). She is currently an artist-in-residence at Bundanon Trust. Collaboration, artistic community and the intersection between art and society informs her practice: in addition to her solo work, she co-directed the inaugural Channels: the Australian Video Art Festival, is a board member at Next Wave, the founding editor of Assemble Papers and co-founder of interdisciplinary collective Tape Projects.

 

government-partners-2

Performance documentation
All images: Document Photography

AsiaTOPAEugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.

 

AsiaTOPAEugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPAEugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.
AsiaTOPA
Eugenia Lim, The People’s Currency (performance documentation), presented at Federation Square as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Melbourne. Image: Document Photography.

 

Flying Buck Exchange

MELBOURNE. 15 – 18 FEBRUARY, 2017.

Flying Buck Exchange is a special presentation of an ongoing ‘Bucking’ performance project by Pakistani-Australian artist Abdullah M.I. Syed. Showcased over three days at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA, Syed’s tongue-in-cheek turn of phrase, Bucking, will see him consuming, distributing and exchanging currency, in this case, in the form of the fabled US dollar bills.

With an immediate surface playfulness underneath which lie more complex renderings of the dysfunctions of global market economies, the dissemination of power, and intrinsic neo-colonial concerns, the US dollar bill becomes a powerful instrument of addressing the micro and the macro. Where the body of the artist is in immediate play, occupied in acts of repetition and endurance, so too is the larger body of the audience, which becomes as an unwitting beneficiary of this seemingly innocuous act of engagement. Innocence and familiarity are tropes that draw those present into the field of action, however the medium itself and the progression of the performance into a more sombre and painful reality rapidly bring darker concerns hurtling to the forefront.

Flying Buck Exchange is a fascinating and at times confronting look at the central role that currency plays in economies of consumption and exchange and how money often navigates cultural and political identities.

Artist Bio:

Dr. Abdullah M.I. Syed (b. 1974, Karachi Pakistan) is a contemporary artist and designer working between Sydney, Karachi and New York. Trained in diverse disciplines, his art practice weaves religious, cultural and socio-political narratives of east and west, seamlessly knitting together art historical references and concerns from each. Syed holds a PhD in Art, Media and Design (2016) and a Master of Fine Arts (2009) from University of New South Wales, Sydney. Syed’s works have been featured in nine solo exhibitions and several national and international curated group exhibitions.

 

Documentation:
All images: Document Photography

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

 

AsiaTOPA

Abdullah M.I. Syed, Flying Buck Exchange (performance documentation), presented at MPavilion as part of the inaugural Asia TOPA.

Performance X 4A at Art Central.

HONG KONG. 20 – 25 MARCH 2017.

Venue: Art Central Hong Kong, 9 Lung Wo Road, Central, Hong Kong.

Image by Tania Palmier Gherardi courtesy of Anida Yeou Ali.

4A returns to Art Central Hong Kong with a performance program with a series of diverse and compelling works. These leading performance artists are all working to question and challenge expectations of the norm – they ask you to imagine yourself in a different form, challenge you to rethink your expectations and invite you to speculate on a spectacle. Through the six days of the fair these artists will perform new iterations of some of their most lauded works. Tobais Gutmann’s face-o-mat returns to Asia after adventures in Papua New Guinea and Japan to refigure and redesign your face, Anida Yeou Ali’s Red Chador will weave through the crowds alongside you as you browse the booths and Hahan will invite you to hack the art market. Premiering at Art Central will be new performance works from Enoch Cheng (HK) and Amrita Hepi (AUS).

Works that will be presented as part of Performance x 4A at Art Central are:

  • Enoch Cheng – Fair Gestures/ 動靜不失其時
  • Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan – Speculative Entertainment No.1 Hong Kong Edition
  • Tobias Gutmann – Face-o-Mat
  • Amrita Hepi –This ______________ may not protect you but at times its enough to know it exists.
  • Anida Yoeu Ali – The Red Chador – Ban Me!

Biographies

Enoch Cheng (1983, Hong Kong.) lives and works in Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Enoch Cheng is an artist, director, performer, writer, independent curator, and founder of art collective Interlocutor.  His practice involves the moving image, installation, curating, dance, music events, theatre and performance. Concerned with the everyday subtleties in contemporary urban lives, his works explore recurrent themes of place, travel, fiction, memory, time and destination. He received his MA in Creative Writing from Goldsmiths, London and BA in English Literature and Art History at the University of Hong Kong. His most recent shows in Hong Kong include You Are Not Alone at Oi! Oil Street Art Space and The Memory of Proximity at Hong Kong Museum of Art.

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan (1983, Kebumen, Indonesia) lives and works in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. 
Hahan’s art making is concerned with the tussle between ‘high art’ and ‘low art’, blurring realism with decoration. Hahan incorporates film, music and street culture into a distinct visual language, creating a sense of movement and spontaneity in what can be described as a topsy-turvy reality steeped in satirical humor. In recent years, he attempts to display an art with the concept that emphasizes on the interaction with the visitors and relate it with the development of art in global as well as its society. He also one of the founders of Ace House Collective, a young artists’ collective and initiative space based in Yogyakarta which trying to capture the culture of Indonesian contemporary society through multidiscipline work process, collaboration, and research.His works have been collected by several art museum including Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) Brisbane, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Melbourne, Australia.

Tobias Gutmann (1987, Wewak, Papua New Guinea) lives and works in Zurich, Sweden. At the heart of Tobias Gutmann’s artistic practice lies the creation and investigation of encounters – between people, cultures, and environments, but also between what we perceive on the outside and what we feel on the inside. The Swiss artist aims to set up situations where such a dialogue can happen. His works morph between performance, installation, and workshops, and often have relational and participatory aspects to them. His Face-O-Mat, analogue portrait machine, has been traveling the world since 2012 and will feature at Art Central 2017. It can be viewed as a quiet critique of how technology has made us obsessed with assembling and portraying an identity that puts us in the best light. Previous Face-O-Mat projects include: Museum Haus Konstrktiv, Zurich, Switzerland, Supergraph, Melbourne, Australia and Mudam, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg.

Amrita Hepi (1989, Townsville, Australia) lives and works in New South Wales, Australia. Amrita Hepi is a Bundjulung and Ngapuhi dancer and choreographer working in the field of experimental dance. Her choreography is rooted in creating movement in transitional spaces, interweaving her urgent cultural heritage and contemporary dance training. The barriers of intersectionality, cultural memory and pop cultural references also feature in her work. Amrita has trained at the National Aboriginal Islander Skills Development Association (NAISDA) dance college, New South Wales, Australia and Alvin Ailey American Dance School, New York. She has exhibited and performed at Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Next Wave Festival, Melbourne, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia, the Australian Centre for Contemporary art, Melbourne, Carriageworks, Sydney, TEDX, Sydney and Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada.

Anida Yoeu Ali (1974, Battambang, Cambodia) lives in Seattle, Washington, United States of America and works between the Asia-Pacific and US. Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s multi-disciplinary practices include performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. She is a first generation Muslim Khmer woman born in Cambodia and raised in Chicago. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. Ali’s works have been exhibited widely in including installations and performances at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8.  In 2014, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. in from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington Bothell where she teaches art, performance and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma, Washington and spends much of her time traveling and working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US.

 

I don’t want to be there when it happens

SYDNEY. 18 AUGUST – 8 OCTOBER 2017.

Raj Kumar, Sonia Leber & David Chesworth and Adeela Suleman.

I don’t want to be there when it happens brings together artists who explore the psychology of contemporary trauma. Recent works by Raj Kumar, Sonia Leber & David Chesworth and Adeela Suleman all confront the larger socio-political realities of Pakistan in the era of contemporary warfare. Through video and installation, the artists address the experience of the individual in the midst of a continuous state of war. By scanning the landscape with nonsensical logic, futilely seeking to document destruction, and questioning the appropriation of religion, the artworks in the exhibition avoid resolution and closure. Instead, they highlight the individual’s inability to comprehend the expansive uncertainty of combat, and the impossibilities of representing the trauma of conflict.

I don’t want to be there when it happens presents truth as a precarious oscillation between fiction and reality. The artists resist literal or documentary approaches to their subjects, relying instead on speculative, symbolic, ambiguous and unstable modes of representation. In doing so, they emphasise how the individual’s attempts to understand and comprehend the reality of contemporary conflict are equally characterised by uncertainty and irresolvability. I don’t want to be there when it happens also seeks to acknowledge and present a multiplicity of perspectives on the ongoing conflicts in Pakistan and its region—perspectives which are all too easily overlooked or obscured by Western media and political interests.

 

Adeela Suleman’s work to be shown in I don’t want to be there when it happens has been co-commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and The Keir Foundation.

Presented in collaboration with:

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About the artists:

Adeela Suleman (b.1970, Karachi, Pakistan, lives and works in Karachi) draws attention to troubled sectarian and gang-led violence in Pakistan. Drawing from the traditions of Islamic art, Suleman moulds hardened steel and co-opts found objects to memorialise the countless killings within her country. With generous support from The Keir Foundation, 4A has co-comissioned Adeela Suleman to create new artworks for I don’t want to be here when it happens.

Suleman studied Sculpture at the Indus Valley School of Art and completed a Master’s degree in International Relations from the University of Karachi. She is the Coordinator of Vasl Artists’ Collective in Karachi, in addition to being Associate Professor and Head of the Fine Art Department at Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture. Suleman has participated extensively with group and solo exhibitions worldwide, including Phantoms of Asia at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco; the 2013 Asian Art Biennial at the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art; Hanging Fire – Contemporary Art from Pakistan at The Asia Society, New York; Gallery Rohtas 2, Lahore; Canvas Gallery, Karachi; Aicon Gallery, New York; and, the International Exhibition of Contemporary Art, Bologna, Italy.

Raj Kumar (b. 1984, Tando Mohammad Khan, Pakistan, lives and works in Tando Mohammad Khan) examines the religious practices, rituals and beliefs of Islam and its place in the contemporary world. Kumar draws from his own Islamic faith and experiences of living in Pakistan, a nation with where 97% of the population are Muslim. This is Kumar’s first international exhibition and is supported by the 4A Set (Sydney) members.

Raj Kumar graduated from the National College of Arts in Textile Design in 2007 and holds a Masters of Visual Arts (Honours) from the National College of Arts, Lahore, Pakistan. The 2015 National College of Arts Degree Show in Lahore was Kumar’s first exhibition as an artist.

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth (Sonia Leber b.1959, Melbourne, Australia, David Chesworth b. 1958, Stoke, England, live and work in Melbourne, Australia) have collaborated since 1996, creating multi-channel sound and media installations for a range of arts and public spaces. The have exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions include Zaum Tractor, Fehily Contemporary, Melbourne, 2014; The Way You Move Me, Fehily Contemporary, Melbourne, 2012; Space-Shifter, Detached/MONA FOMA, Hobart, 2012, and at the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, 2011. Leber & Chesworth premiere their new work, Earthwork, at 4A as part of this exhibition.

Their work has also been included in numerous group exhibitions including Borders, Barriers, Walls, Monash University Museum of Art, 2016; Substation Contemporary Art Prize, Melbourne (winner), 2016; The Documentary Take, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, 2016; 56th Venice Biennale: All the World’s Futures, 2015, 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, 2014; Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2013-14; Cooperation Territory, 16thLine Art Gallery and Makaronka Art Center; Spaced: Art Out of Place, Fremantle Art Centre, 2012; Animal/ Human, UQ Art Museum, Brisbane, 2012; Stealing the Senses, Govett-Brewster Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand, 2011.

Exhibition documentation

 

Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions
variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has been commissioned by
4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Centre: Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions variable, installation view, detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography. Back: Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Centre: Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions
variable, installation view, detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Back: Adeela Suleman, After all
its always someone else who dies
, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view. Courtesy the artist. Both artworks
have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. Image:
Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, I don’t want to be there when it happens (2013/2017), hand-beaten stainless steel, iron and bulb, dimensions
variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. This artwork has
been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously
supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported
by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre 
for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously 
supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported 
by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre 
for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously 
supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported 
by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre 
for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously 
supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported 
by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

Adeela Suleman, After all its always someone else who dies, (2017), hanging steel, dimensions variable, installation view: detail,
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney and
generously supported by The Keir Foundation. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney
and supported by The Keir Foundation. Image: Document Photography.

 

Front: Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography. Back: Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Front: Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Back: Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm
(each, 9 mats in total), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Image courtesy the artists.

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary
Asian Art. Image courtesy the artists.

 

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork (video still), (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Artwork and image courtesy the artists.

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork (video still), (2017), HD video, stereo audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre
for Contemporary Asian Art. Artwork and image courtesy the artists.

 

Front: Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography. Back: Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video, stero audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

Front: Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view, 4A
Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Back: Sonia Leber & David Chesworth, Earthwork, (2017), HD video,
stero audio, 5:00, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Image: Document Photography.

 

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view, 4A Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view: detail, 4A
Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view: detail, 4A 
Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

 

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mat sin total), installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

Raj Kumar, Meet, Pray and Pay, (2017), playing dice, 66cm x 118cm x 1.2 cm (each, 9 mats in total), installation view: detail, 4A 
Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.