Chapter One: Thinking through it

PEACOCK GALLERY, AUBURN. 15 September – 21 October 2018.

Opening: Saturday 15 September 2018, 1:30 – 3:30pm.

As part of the 2018 Curators’ Intensive presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art two emerging curators have been selected to curate an exhibition at Peacock Gallery.

Chapter One: Thinking through it is a project curated by Sabrina Baker that exists as a reading room, research space and open studio. Artists have contributed things that influence their working methods and you’re invited to dive into their practice through the stacks of books taken from bedside tables and studio desks, the photographs, knick knacks and stuff that feeds into the development of their work.

Hannah Donnelly, Thea Jones, Shivanjani Lal, Nikki Lam, Anja Loughhead, Stephen Pham, and Jason Phu work with different materials and methods to craft works that explore place in relation to the self.

Each of the artists explore themes of personal identity and myth making with a grounding in being both inside and outside of their local environments – where they are now and where they have been before.

Tongues (curated by Isabel Rouch) // Peacock Gallery – 4A Curators’ Intensive Exhibition 1

PEACOCK GALLERY, AUBURN. 15 September – 21 October 2018.

Opening: Saturday 15 September 2018, 1:30 – 3:30pm.

As part of the 2018 Curators’ Intensive presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art two emerging curators have been selected to curate an exhibition at Peacock Gallery.

Tongues (curated by Isabel Rouch) is the first offering in an ongoing curatorial project, exploring the varied effects language can have on us as individuals.

The exhibition questions how our experience of the world and self changes with language, and what can be lost or gained through translation.

Tongues brings together the personal perspectives of multidisciplinary, Sydney based artists, Yeliz Yorulmaz, Kai Wasikowski and Eugene Choi; each sharing the experience of being multilingual or growing up in a multilingual context.

All three respond to the theme of identity through language, reflecting particularly on how their exposure to linguistic diversity has influenced them, and in addition, how their art practice fits into this layered understanding and correspondence.

Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area

SYDNEY. 20 JANUARY – 25 FEBRUARY 2018

Lee Kun-Yong with Australian artists Huseyin Sami, Daniel Von Sturmer and Emily Parsons-Lord.

Equal Area presents the work of Lee Kun-Yong, one of Korea’s most seminal conceptual artists, charting the development of his visual and theoretical methodology that has expanded possibilities for performance art since the 1970s. Lee is widely acclaimed for his innovative series of performances that examine the the connection between the logic of the mind and the gestures of the body. Throughout his career, Lee has investigated the connection between the human psyche and action through the act of performance and performance. His performances often test this relationship through the act of repetition, demonstrating how the construct of logic is subjective to its locale — slight shifts in each performance capture the body within present moments, leaving traces of an ‘event’.

In this unique presentation of photographic documentation of performances spanning his almost six-decade career, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art brings Lee Kun-Yong’s practice into dialogue with three contemporary Australian artists. Equal Area opens with a special performance of Snail’s Gallop, one of his most critically lauded works which he is staging in Australia for the first time. This is followed by a series of performances and live interventions by Australian artists, taking place in dialogue with the residue of Lee’s performances, that build on this examination of the repeated gesture and elucidate Lee’s influence on global contemporary performative practice.

 


 

Lee Kun-Yong (b. 1942, Sariwon, Korea; lives and works in Gunsan, Korea) is one of Korea’s most seminal conceptual artists, exploring the nexus between the human mind and its connection to the world. His experimental performative practice emerged in 1970s South Korea, a period where the country was marked by diminished civil rights and martial law, including civilian assembly controls and tightly scrutinised codes of social propriety. Through this period, Lee led numerous artistic responses to the political climate, creating subversive automated drawing experiments that made subtle yet identifiable comments on the authoritarian state. He continues his line of experimentation today, collaborating with new artists and bringing his messaging into the 21st century.

Lee Kun-Yong’s exhibition history includes: Experimental Art of Suwon in the 1980–1990s: It’s Not Quite That (2017), Suwon iPark Museum of Art, Suwon, Korea; As the Moon Waxes and Wanes (2016), National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Gwacheon, Korea (MMCA); Lee Kun-Yong in Snail’s Gallop (2014), MMCA; Korean Historical Conceptual Art 1970–80s: Jack-of-all-trades (2010), Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, Ansan, Korea; Lee Kun-Yong: Logic, Life, Commonplace (1998), Fine Arts Center of The Korean Culture and Arts Foundation, Seoul, Korea; A Groping for the Identity of Korean Contemporary Art II: The Art in the ‘Reduction’ and ‘Expansion’ Period (1991), Hanwon Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Korean Contemporary Art: The Trend of the 1970s (1974), Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei, Taiwan; 8th Biennale de Paris (1973), Paris, France; and 15th Bienal de São Paulo (1979), São Paulo, Brazil.

His works are held in numerous public and private collections, including the Jeonbuk Museum of Art, Wanju, Korea; Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea; National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea; Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea, and The Rachofsky Collection, Dallas, USA.

 

Emily Parsons-Lord (b. 1984, Bathurst, NSW; lives and works Sydney) is a cross-disciplinary contemporary artist whose art and practice is informed by research and critical dialogue with materials and climate science, through investigation into air and light, both materially, and culturally. Parsons-Lord’s work interrogates notions of the ‘natural’, the universe, and considers deep history and speculative futures, with works that engaged with the materiality of invisibility, magic, and the stories we tell about reality.

Select exhibitions include: NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging), Artspace, Sydney (2017); There is nothing accidental or surprising about this, Vitalstatistix for Climate Century, Port Adelaide (2017-2018); The Future Leaks Out, Liveworks Festival, Carriageworks, Sydney (2017); Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2016); Trod by Beasts Alone, Wellington St Projects, Sydney (2017); Bristol Biennial: In Other Worlds, Bristol, UK (2016); Our Fetid Rank (Margaret Thatcher’s bottom lip and Bill Clinton’s tongue),  Firstdraft, Sydney (2015);  Ever Fresh, STILLS gallery, Sydney (2015); Underbelly Arts 2015, Cockatoo Island,  Sydney (2015); busied and bruised with looking, Perth Centre for Photography, Perth (2015).

Parsons-Lord has been a finalist in the NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging) in 2017 and the Fishers’ Ghost Award in 2016. Her work is held in the collection of Artbank, Australia.

Huseyin Sami (b. 1979, United Kingdom; lives and works Sydney) has been exhibiting since the late 1990s, with a multi-disciplinary practice that engages with painting, sculpture and installation. Sami’s work challenges and investigates the possibilities of paint itself – working with the colour, form and materiality of household acrylic paints but without any of the tools, gestures or decisions normally associated with the medium – letting paint drop and pool and paintings to ‘virtually make themselves’. Sami’s practice poses questions and develops new strategies for the production of paintings.

Selected exhibitions include Superposition of three types, Artspace, Sydney (2017); Shut up and Paint, National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), Melbourne (2016); Whispers from a Band of Myth Makers, Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney (2015); Assemblage II, 107 Redfern Projects, Sydney (2014); Never Underestimate a Monochrome, Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art, Rancho Cucamonga, USA (2013); 3, with Koji Ryui and Brandan Van Hek, Alaska Projects, Sydney (2013); Twenty/20, UTS Gallery, Sydney and Dubbo Regional Gallery, NSW (2010); Blue Blah! And other works, Kunst Projects, Berlin, Germany (2009); and Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2004). He was the winner of the 2005 Fauvette Louriero Memorial Artists Travel Scholarship.w

Sami’s work is held in many public collections, including that of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Artbank, Australia; Saatchi & Saatchi, New Zealand, as well as in private collections in Australia, Germany, Great Britain, Japan and the United States.

 

Daniel von Sturmer (b. Auckland, New Zealand, 1972; lives and works in Melbourne) is a leading video and multimedia artist whose works investigate and orchestrate the fields of relation between things, people, light, space, video and time. von Sturmer’s practice integrates video, photography and installation and often tests the ways in which the audience views artworks inside and outside the gallery.

In 2007, von Sturmer represented Australia at the 52nd Venice Biennale, showing in the Australian Pavilion. Recent exhibitions include: Electric Light (facts/figure), Bus Projects, Melbourne (2017); Under the Sun, State Library of New South Wales, Sydney and Monash Gallery of Art, Melbourne (2017); Red Green Blue: A History of Australian Video Art, Griffith University Art Gallery, Queensland College of Art, Brisbane (2017); Collective Visions: 130 Years, Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria (2017); Shut Up and Paint, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2016); The Kaleidoscopic Turn, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2015); 21st Century Heide: The Collection Since 2000, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria (2015); Camera Ready Actions, Young Projects Gallery, Los Angeles (2014); Daniel von Sturmer, Co­lumbus Museum of Art, Ohio (2013); Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2013); Time & Vision: New work from Australian artists, The Bargehouse, London (2012); Nego­tiating this world: Contemporary Australian Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2012); Set Piece, Site Gallery, Shef­field, United Kingdom (2009); The Object of Things, Australian Pavilion, Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2007).

von Sturmer’s work is held held in a number of significant collections, including that of the Gothenburg Museum of Art, Sweden; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand; Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne; Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria; Chartwell Collection, New Zealand; Dunedin Public Art Gallery, New Zealand; The Michael Buxton Contemporary Australian Art Collection, Melbourne; Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne; Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales; and Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane.

 

Exhibition Documentation

 

 

4a-jan-18-20

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Eating Biscuit, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) biscuits, bandages and splints, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-22

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Eating Biscuit, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) biscuits, bandages and splints, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography.

4a-jan-18-13

Installation view (pre-performance): Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) acrylic on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Pre-performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-26

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Back: Lee Kun-Yong performing The method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, acrylic paint on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea.

 

4a-jan-18-38

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, The Method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, re-performed in 2018. Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. These works have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-59

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Pre-performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, The Method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1976, re-performed in 2018. Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. These works have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-jan-18-64

Lee Kun-Yong performing Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-1

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Pictured: Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, performance, acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-8

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Terrorism is an enemy of Humankind (re-performed in 2017), white sheet, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) acrylic on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-9

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Left to right: Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, (re-performed in 2018), Acrylic paint on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Daniel von Sturmer, Electric Light (facts/figures/4A), 2017, animated light installation, dimensions variableLee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-4, first performed in 1976 (re-performed in 2017), dimensions variable. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-feb-18-web-2

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Left to right: Lee Kun-Yong and Huseyin Sami, The method of Drawing 76-1-18 and Painting Performance (with feet), 2018. Acrylic paint on door, dimensions variable. Lee’s work courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Sami’s work courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery.

 

4a-feb-18-web-17

Installation detail view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Emily Parsons-Lord, a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable. Behind, left to right: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong Logic of Place, first performed in 1975, (re-printed in 2017), C-type print, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-printed in 2017) paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-4, first performed in 1976 (re-printed in 2017),paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. All courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography Image: Document Photography.

 

4a-emily-feb-18-web-6

Front: Emily Parsons-Lord, a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

4a-emily-feb-18-web-9

Front: Emily Parsons-Lord performing a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

4a-emily-feb-18-web-37

Front: Emily Parsons-Lord performing a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

Club 4A

MELBOURNE 17 FEBRUARY & SYDNEY 23 FEBRUARY, 2018

Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan) headline Club 4A in Sydney and Melbourne this Lunar New Year.

 

In February, 4A takes performance art back to the club. 4A has been working with some of the most exciting and adventurous performance artists over recent years and in 2018 we leave the confines of the white cube and venture into the darkness of the club! For one night only, Club 4A in Sydney and Melbourne will present some of Australia’s leading performance artists as well as acclaimed international acts.

In Melbourne on Saturday 17 February as part of White Night, Club 4A takes over the Toff in Town with Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan), with additional artists: Makeda, Strict Face, Jalé , and Coris.

In Sydney on Friday 23 February, head down to Dynasty Karaoke to see with Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan), supported by Slim Set, Tzekin (V Kim), and Jikuroux  and Coris (DJ).

Tickets for Club 4A Sydney have officially SOLD OUT.

SET TIMES

Doors: 7.00pm
Coris x Amrita Hepi: 7.00pm
Slim Set: 8.00pm
DEADKEBAB & PSYCHIC$: 9.00pm
Rainbow Chan: 10.00pm
Tzekin: 11.00pm
Jikuroux: 12.00am
DJ Plead: 1.00am
DJs b2b2b2…..: 2.00am – close

 

LISTEN // CLUB 4A Melbourne Mix // 17 Feb 2018

 

LISTEN // CLUB 4A Sydney  Mix // 23 Feb 2018

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium and Engagement – 21st Biennale of Sydney

SYDNEY. 16 MARCH – 11 JUNE 2018.

 

21st Biennale of Sydney

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

16 March – 11 June, 2018

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and other venues

Artistic Director: Mami Kataoka

 

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement will examine the theory of ‘superposition’ by investigating how it might operate in the world today. 70 leading international artists – chosen to offer a panoramic view of how opposing interpretations, can come together – will participate across seven venues. The exhibition at Artspace, Sydney will feature exceptional new projects by a diverse field of celebrated international artists.

 

Exhibiting artists at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:

Akira Takayama: Born 1969 in Saitama, Japan. Lives and works in Tokyo, Japan; Yokohama, Japan; and Frankfurt, Germany
Jun Yang: Born 1975 in Qingtian, China. Lives and works in Vienna, Austria; Taipei, Taiwan; and Yokohama, Japan

 

Biennale of Sydney

2018 marks the 45th anniversary of the Biennale of Sydney and its twenty-first edition. The Biennale provides a platform for art and ideas and is recognised for commissioning and presenting innovative, thought-provoking art from Australia and around the globe. A leading international art event, The Biennale of Sydney has showcased the work of nearly 1,800 artists from more than 100 countries. It has attracted over 4 million visitors since its inception in 1973 and holds an important place on both the national and international stage.

The Biennale of Sydney is located on the traditional lands of the Gadigal people of the Eora nation. We acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Land and pay respect to Elders, both past and present.

 

Mami Katoka, Artistic Director

Internationally renowned curator Mami Kataoka is a key figure in analysing socio-historical and generational trends, particularly in the context of Japanese and Asian art, and frequently writes and lectures on contemporary art in Asia.

She has held the position of Chief Curator of the Mori Art Museum (MAM) in Tokyo since 2009, and Senior Curator since 2003. At MAM, Kataoka has curated numerous notable exhibitions including ‘Roppongi Crossing’ (survey show of contemporary Japanese art) (2004, 2013), ‘Sensing Nature: Perception of Nature in Japan’ (2010); as well as major survey shows of prominent artists in Asia such as Tsuyoshi Ozawa, Ai Weiwei, Lee Bul, Makoto Aida, Lee Mingwei and N.S. Harsha.

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Performance x 4A

HONG KONG. 27 MARCH – 1 APRIL, 2018.

Venue: Art Central Hong Kong, 9 Lung Wo Road, Central, Hong Kong.

Building upon its critically acclaimed performance programme, Australia’s 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) returns to Art Central with a series of interactive and live works that address contemporary concerns of excess and dispossession. In an era characterised by polarities, and expansive disparity across societies, the pervasive sense of tension informs the thematic of the programme. Showcasing leading contemporary artists from across the Asia-Pacific region, the works respond directly to global unease through a series of daily on-site performances. Participating artists include: Caroline Garcia (Australia), FJ Kunting (Indonesia), Sam Lo (Singapore) as well as artist duo Sampson Wong & Lam Chi Fai (Hong Kong).

About the Artists and their Artworks: 

Sampson Wong and Lam Chi Fai’s new media installation, Pavilion for our living, contemplates the housing crisis currently affecting Hong Kong citizens. The installation invites participants to experience the micro-apartments that many Hong Kong citizens call home. Temporarily simulating one of these apartments within the art fair environs, the exhibition space becomes one of containment. Once inside the simulated space the viewer gains access to audio interviews with micro-apartment dwellers on how they navigate these literal spaces, along with the problems attached to living inside one of these homes.

Sampson Wong (b.1985) and Lam Chi Fai (b.1985) are Hong Kong based artists who have collaborated in art-making since 2010. Their collaborative works received the First Prize in Freedom Flower Awards, the Gold Award and Silver Award of ifva and were exhibited in the Hong Kong Museum of Art and the Slought Foundation. They have formed the Add Oil Team to focus on projects concerning creative activism, the collective were committedly practiced during Hong Kong‘s Umbrella Movement, and their projects have been recently exhibited in the 5th Asian Art Biennial.

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 5pm – 9pm

Tuesday 27th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

Wednesday 28th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

Thursday 29th: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm & 5.30pm – 8pm

Friday 30th:12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm, 5.00pm – 6.30pm

Saturday 31st: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm, 5.00pm – 6.30pm

Sunday 1st: 12.00pm – 1.30pm & 2.30pm – 4.30pm

 

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Caroline Garcia’s The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures, references the seminal performances of Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Coco Fusco. Garcia’s work interrogates the anthropological phenomenon of the ‘ethnographic exhibition’, which has placed subaltern bodies on display in museums, zoos, circuses and theatres throughout history . Garcia develops and builds upon this concept in The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures where the artist’s cis-female, coloured body is encased within a vitrine, confronting degrees of politicisation, as her cultural identity and gender is put on show. The Vitrine of Dancing Cultures is a museographic dance installation that presents auto-ethnographic portraits of Garcia, bringing forth her Filipino ancestry. She engages in a durational dance ritual using a Nintendo Wii to examine the neocolonisation of popular culture and cultural tourism. Through repetition, this performance brings into question an individual’s stamina when facing expectations of cultural competence and visibility.

Caroline Garcia (b.1988) is a culturally promiscuous performance maker. She works across live performance and video through a hybridised aesthetic of cross-cultural dance, ritual practice, new media, and the sampling of popular culture and colonial imagery. In her work, Garcia centres peripheral bodies by adopting the role of shape shifter – sliding into the gaps between cultures, experiences of otherness, and timeless clichés of exotic femininity. Garcia has presented at Manila Biennale: OPENCITY2018 (Manila, Philippines), The Art Gallery of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia), Channels: The Australian Video Art Festival (Melbourne, Australia).

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Tuesday 27th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

Wednesday 28th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

Thursday 29th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Friday 30th: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Saturday 31st: 3.00pm – 3.45pm & 5.30pm – 6.15pm

Sunday 1st: 3.00pm – 3.45pm

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TALK and Goal: Strong Relationship, but first, talk! are two durational performances by Indonesian artist FJ Kunting. TALK is a durational exercise in the resistance of excess. The artist explores the struggle and the fight for his voice to be heard. Tethered to a contraption of tools and pipes he attempts to speak, however his speech is reduced to bubbles that, over time, envelop him. As exhaustion nears, the futility of his effort becomes apparent with the artist ceasing to struggle and the bubbles slowly disappear. In Kunting’s second performance, Goal: Strong Relationship, but first, talk, language remains the heart of all communication. Kunting examines the ebb and flow of conversation as two figures, faceless except for a spout, appear in a wordless discussion. Talk is reduced to a bubble exchange, with each figure conversing through a stream of bubbles. While infinitely playful, these performances reveal patterns of conversation, exchange and balance in relationships.

FJ Kunting (b.1982) is a Yogyakarta, Indonesian based artist who has been developing a performance practice since 2012. Widely regarded as one of Indonesia’s most exciting performers, Kunting is fundamentally interested in an examination of human relations and engagement. His live performances are durational and hypnotic.

Performance times: 

Tuesday 27th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Wednesday 28th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Thursday 29th: 11.30am – 12.15pm & 7.30pm – 8.15pm

Friday 30th: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Saturday 31st: 11.30am – 12.15pm

Sunday 1st: 11.30am – 12.15pm

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Progress: The Game of Leaders, invites audiences to participate in a high-stakes game of imagined nation building. Artist Sam Lo poses the question: “Where will you be standing when the First World falls?” Working with giant Jenga blocks, participants are invited to prioritise and select the building blocks of their ideal society. In your nation, will economic progress be favoured over military spending? Higher standards of living or increasing globalisation? As players jockey for top position in the imaginary nation’s guidance, the structure grows more precarious and its foundations ever more compromised. The game can only end one way.

Sam Lo (b.1986), also known by the moniker SKL0, is a Singaporean contemporary artist whose work is heavily inspired by daily observations and research on the sociopolitical climate. In 2013 her practice was placed under scrutiny, following her 2013 arrest for vandalism and subsequent sentencing of 240 hours of community service, bringing issues such as public space, freedom of expression and activism to the fore.  Progress: The Game of Leaders was commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and premiered at MPavilion as part of Melbourne Festival, 2017.

Performance times: 

Monday 26th: 7pm – 8pm

Tuesday 27th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Wednesday 28th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Thursday 29th: 1pm – 2.30pm & 6.30 pm -7.30pm

Friday 30th: 1pm – 2.30pm

Saturday 31st: 1pm – 2.30pm

Sunday 1st: 1pm – 2.30pm

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The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu & John Young Zerunge

YOUNG. 21 APRIL 2018.

Between November 1860 and September 1861 the New South Wales goldfields of Burrangong, near the present day township of Young, was the the site of Australia’s largest racially motivated riot. Rising antagonism over gold mining disparities and cultural habits saw trivial misunderstandings intensify into racial tensions that erupted into violence across the goldfields. Over 10 months, Chinese miners were subjected to threats, robbery and sustained acts of violence.This anti-Chinese sentiment had swept through the goldfields of Victoria in the 1850s and by the early 1860s had reached a flashpoint in New South Wales, provoking public opinion and debate. In Sydney, the NSW Parliament responded to the contention by passing legislation to restrict Chinese immigration and began, alongside Victoria and South Australia, to write the prelude to the White Australia Policy.

Informed by a series of residencies in Young and surrounding historical sites, Chinese-Australian artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge trace the events and repercussions of this period of civil disobedience. Supported by historian Dr Karen Schamberger, the artists’ research-led practice interweaves these accounts of history to create contemporary mediations that reflects upon the forces of identity, economics, race and otherness in Australia today. In April 2018 their creative investigations will be realised in Young. This collaborative history project will bear a legacy publication.

This exhibition is the first iteration of a four-part exhibition project. The second will be realised at 4A’s Haymarket home from June 29 – August 14, 2008, followed by a publication and then a public monument in Young.

YOU ARE INVITED. 

On Saturday April 21, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is leading a community event with Australian-Chinese artists John Young Zerunge and Jason Phu in response the to events of The Burrangong Affray, including the Lambing Flat Riots, 1860 -1861.

We invite the community of Young and the surrounding areas to join the artists as they create a tribute at Young Chinese Cemetary, Murrumburrah and Blackguard Gully, Young. At each site the artists will lead us in a ceremony of incense burning, offerings and ceremonial gestures to welcome good luck and banish the bad spirits of the past.

Join the artists as they mark each of they pay tribute to these sites and these historic events.

Date: Saturday 21 April 2018

Time and Location: 10am at Young Chinese Cemetary and 11:30am Blackguard Gully. Followed by an informal meeting with the artists.

Bring: Something that makes noise, a pot or a pan, a whistle, a recorder or a drum.

Contact and RSVP details: hello@4a.com.au or 9212 0380

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Jason Phu (b.1989, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Sydney) studied at COFA, Sydney graduating with honours in 2011 and NSCAD, Nova Scotia. He works across a range of mediums from installation, painting and sculpture where he traces the connections between the tradition of Chinese brush and ink painting and contemporary practice. His work has been informed by several China based residencies at CAFA, Beijing; DAC Studios, Chongqing; and Organhaus, Chongqing which has enabled him to further investigate the tradition of calligraphy. Recently Jason has had numerous solo exhibitions in Australia including Westspace, Melbourne; Nicholas Projects, Melbourne; CCAS Gorman Arts Centre, Canberra; and ALASKA PROJECTS, Sydney. He won the coveted Sulman Prize in 2015 and in the same year received a Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship which allowed him to develop his practice between China and Australia.

John Young Zerunge (b.1956, Hong Kong; lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) started his artistic practice in the 1980s with writings on conceptualism and post-modernism. Within four-decades of artistic production, Young’s oeuvre has seen various transformations within his practice of painting and installation. In the last decade his work has focused on two strands, Abstract Paintings and historical re-imaginings in the form of the History Projects; starting with Bonhoeffer in Harlem (Berlin, Bamberg) then in the last five years, projects based on the history of the Chinese Diaspora in Australia since 1840. Retrospectives of his work have been held at the TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria in 2005 and Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University Canberra in 2013 and he has been included in major exhibitions in the likes of New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Berlin.

Dr Karen Schamberger (b.1980, Australia. Lives and works in Canberra, Australia) researches and writes about Australian museums, migration and cultural diversity. Her thesis ‘Identity, belonging and cultural diversity in Australian museums’ (2016) examined the way that objects mediate relations between people of culturally diverse backgrounds in Australian history and society, as well as the roles that museums play in these relations. One of her thesis case studies traced the biography of the ‘Roll-Up No Chinese’ banner created during the 1860-61 Lambing Flat riots and now held by the Lambing Flat Folk Museum in Young, NSW.
She currently works at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as part of the curatorial team developing a new environmental history gallery.  She has previously worked in curatorial roles on the ‘Identity: Yours, Mine Ours’ exhibition (2011) at the Immigration Museum, Melbourne and the ‘Australian Journeys’ gallery (2009) at the National Museum of Australia. 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body

The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu & John Young Zerunge

SYDNEY. 29 JUNE – 12 AUGUST 2018.

Between November 1860 and September 1861 the New South Wales goldfields of Burrangong, near the present day township of Young, was the the site of Australia’s largest racially motivated riot. Rising antagonism over gold mining disparities and cultural habits saw trivial misunderstandings intensify into racial tensions that erupted into violence across the goldfields. Over 10 months, Chinese miners were subjected to threats, robbery and sustained acts of violence.This anti-Chinese sentiment had swept through the goldfields of Victoria in the 1850s and by the early 1860s had reached a flashpoint in New South Wales, provoking public opinion and debate. In Sydney, the NSW Parliament responded to the contention by passing legislation to restrict Chinese immigration and began, alongside Victoria and South Australia, to write the prelude to the White Australia Policy.

Through a series of residencies in Young and surrounding historical sites, Chinese-Australian artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge trace the events and repercussions of this period of civil disobedience. Supported by historian Dr Karen Schamberger, the artists’ research-led practice interweaves these accounts of history to create contemporary mediations that reflects upon the forces of identity, economics, race and otherness in Australia today. This collaborative history project will bear a legacy publication.

This exhibition is the second iteration of a four-part exhibition project. The first was be realised in Young in April. 2018.

Jason Phu (b.1989, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Sydney) studied at COFA, Sydney graduating with honours in 2011 and NSCAD, Nova Scotia. He works across a range of mediums from installation, painting and sculpture where he traces the connections between the tradition of Chinese brush and ink painting and contemporary practice. His work has been informed by several China based residencies at CAFA, Beijing; DAC Studios, Chongqing; and Organhaus, Chongqing which has enabled him to further investigate the tradition of calligraphy. Recently Jason has had numerous solo exhibitions in Australia including Westspace, Melbourne; Nicholas Projects, Melbourne; CCAS Gorman Arts Centre, Canberra; and ALASKA PROJECTS, Sydney. He won the coveted Sulman Prize in 2015 and in the same year received a Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship which allowed him to develop his practice between China and Australia.

John Young Zerunge (b.1956, Hong Kong; lives and works in Melbourne, Australia) started his artistic practice in the 1980s with writings on conceptualism and post-modernism. Within four-decades of artistic production, Young’s oeuvre has seen various transformations within his practice of painting and installation. In the last decade his work has focused on two strands, Abstract Paintings and historical re-imaginings in the form of the History Projects; starting with Bonhoeffer in Harlem (Berlin, Bamberg) then in the last five years, projects based on the history of the Chinese Diaspora in Australia since 1840. Retrospectives of his work have been held at the TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria in 2005 and Drill Hall Gallery, Australian National University Canberra in 2013 and he has been included in major exhibitions in the likes of New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Berlin.

Dr Karen Schamberger (b.1980, Australia. Lives and works in Canberra, Australia) researches and writes about Australian museums, migration and cultural diversity. Her thesis ‘Identity, belonging and cultural diversity in Australian museums’ (2016) examined the way that objects mediate relations between people of culturally diverse backgrounds in Australian history and society, as well as the roles that museums play in these relations. One of her thesis case studies traced the biography of the ‘Roll-Up No Chinese’ banner created during the 1860-61 Lambing Flat riots and now held by the Lambing Flat Folk Museum in Young, NSW.

She currently works at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as part of the curatorial team developing a new environmental history gallery.  She has previously worked in curatorial roles on the ‘Identity: Yours, Mine Ours’ exhibition (2011) at the Immigration Museum, Melbourne and the ‘Australian Journeys’ gallery (2009) at the National Museum of Australia. 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body

 

Exhibition documentation

 

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John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. Jason Phu, Do not stick your hand in the fire, sit near it and observe the stars, 2018, framed editioned photograph on paper, 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, framed digital photographic series on paper, 2 works, each work 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, The Field, 2018, HD video, 8.05 minutes. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, objects from the performance Action: Covering at Blackguard Gully, Young, 21.04.2018: metal bucket, spade, felt blankets. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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John Young Zerunge, The Field, 2018, HD video, 8.05 minutes, installation view. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, Do not stick your hand in the fire, sit near it and observe the stars, 2018, framed editioned photograph on paper, 1212 x 812mm. John Young Zerunge, Action: Covering, 2018, framed digital photographic series on paper, 2 works, each work 1212 x 812mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Installation view, clockwise, from left:
Jason Phu, ROLLING ROLLS ROLLED ROLL, 2018, ink on sheet, dimensions variable, 4 works, each work 1200 x 1200mm. John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Installation view, clockwise, from left:
Jason Phu, ROLLING ROLLS ROLLED ROLL, 2018, ink on sheet, dimensions variable, 4 works, each work 1200 x 1200mm. John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm. All works commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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John Young Zerunge, Lambing Flat, installation view, 2018, digital print on paper, chalk and paint on paper, 27 works; overall dimension 3200 x 7100mm, each work 1000 x 700mm, commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.
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Jason Phu, In the morning I wake the rooster. In the afternoon I drive across the mountains & waters. At night I cut all my ties, installation view (installation view), 2018, multimedia installation, dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge. Image: Document Photography.

Temporary Certainty

SYDNEY. 31 AUGUST – 14 OCTOBER 2018.


Rushdi Anwar 

Alana Hunt 
Sarker Protick 

Temporary Certainty is shaped by an investigation of sudden shifts of historical change wrought by complex interventions in the greater Asia region. Showcasing new works from Australian artists Rushdi Anwar and Alana Hunt alongside a new body of work from Sarker Protick, this exhibition brings together three distinct voices that share long-standing commitments to humanitarian and activist concerns. With a focus on Bengal, Kurdistan and the Kimberley region of Western Australia, Temporary Certainty explores how artists approach geography as a marker of the consequences of broader geopolitical expediencies.

The three distinct geographical contexts represented in this exhibition, each with their seemingly disparate environmental challenges and contingencies, are here connected by the way the artists have explored questions of nationalisms, the legacies of sovereignty, and contested narratives of memorialisation. Equally defined by more urgent concerns and experiences of displacement and transience, the works presented in Temporary Certainty are distinguished by their emergence within conditions of uneasy reconciliation. Additionally, a common thread between each artist’s vision across the works presented in this exhibition is the central importance of the photographic image as a medium that excels at mediating between space and time, reality and illusion. The artists utilise this visual language, alongside other mediums and methodologies, in a shared pursuit of seeking to unveil the symbolic resonances that inhabit built environments within fractured contexts.

Alana Hunt’s activities as an artist are defined by her commitment to broadening and challenging the possibilities of communicating ideas in the public realm. For Temporary Certainty, Hunt has created a new work, Faith in a pile of stones (2018), that takes as its focus Lake Argyle. Located near the artist’s home in the town of Kununurra, Lake Argyle was constructed in 1971 (and filled by 1974), following the damming of the Ord River. An immense human-engineered reservoir of freshwater whose capacity is more than eighteen times the volume of Sydney Harbour, its construction for the purpose of irrigation for agricultural production drowned places of significance and altered the ecologies of country belonging primarily to Miriwoong, but also Gija and Malgnin people. Hunt reconfigures the monumental aspect of the dam wall in a work that explores the convergence of the bureaucratic management of natural resources driven by colonial dreams of development that have been shaped by faith in the idea of permanence.

Rushdi Anwar presents two works that are deeply related to the artist’s experiences as a member of the Kurdish diaspora. The video and sound installation Facing Living: The Past in the Present (2015) shows a pair of hands that proceed to tear up and piece back together an official portrait of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein until the image is overwhelmed by black adhesive tape, an act that balances between destruction and creation, erasure and elegy for those who suffered under Hussein’s rule. We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire (2018) is the artist’s response to his recent experience of entering a church in the town of Bashiqa located in north east Mosul, part of disputed territories between the Kurdistan Regional Government and Iraqi government. This work explores unsettling similarities between the destruction, transience and renewal faced by displaced and uprooted communities globally and the built environments they are forced to leave.

Sarker Protick’s Exodus (2015–ongoing) considers the expediencies of decolonisation while at the same time being a haunting meditation on the universal contingencies of time. Over a selection of photographs and moving image, the artist explores the decaying buildings and surrounding lands of the feudal estates in East Bengal that were previously owned by Hindu jamindars, or landlords. Following the Liberation War of 1971 that abruptly established the newly independent nation of Bangladesh, huge migrations took place across Bengal. This saw wealthy Hindu landowners abandon their estates for India in fear of the kind of violent reprisals that had erupted following the Partition of India in 1947, while at the same time many Muslims fled West Bengal heading east. A series of controversial laws dating from 1948, culminating in the Vested Property Act of 1974, allowed the confiscation of property by Bangladeshi authorities from groups declared ‘enemies of the state’. Since then, these estates have commonly been left in disrepair, taken over by nature and appropriated by local villagers—another chapter in a landscape indelibly marked by the influence of Mughal rule and British imperialism (1).

Grappling with tensions between certainty and doubt, permanence and all that is ephemeral, Temporary Certainty contemplates the value of what can be apprehended—much less held onto—with any guarantee in an age lurching towards ever greater polarisation.

Temporary Certainty is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Rushdi Anwar’s commissioned work has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body. The presentation of Sarker Protick’s Exodus has been supported by The Esplanade, Singapore, with additional support from the Australian Centre for Photography.

(1) Sarker Protick’s Exodus was internationally premiered in the exhibition The Life of Things at The Esplanade, Singapore, from 19 January to 8 April 2018. This text incorporates aspects of curator Sam I-shan’s accompanying text for this exhibition. 


Artists:

Rushdi Anwar (b. Halabja, Kurdistan) is a Melbourne-based artist, currently working between Australia and Thailand. His installation, sculpture, painting, photo-painting and video work often reflect on socio-political issues relating to Kurdistan, Iraq and the Middle East. He explores these issues through an investigation of form, utilising a material vocabulary and different processes of making. Anwar was educated in Kurdistan and Australia, studying at the Institute of Kirkuk- Kurdistan and Enmore Design Centre/Sydney Institute. He holds a Master of Fine Art (2010) and a PhD in Fine Art (2016) from RMIT University, Melbourne. He has held solo and group exhibitions widely in Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Kurdistan, Norway, Switzerland, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and USA. Recent and upcoming exhibitions include 12th Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2018), and the 13th Havana Biennial, Cuba (2019). Anwar’s works are held in the collections of the Australian War Memorial, the Kurdistan Regional Government, and in private collections. He has curated exhibitions in Kurdistan (2010), Thailand (2012, 2015), and Australia (2013). Following several artist-in-residence programs in Thailand, he co-founded and co-coordinated the Australian Thai Artist Interchange, Melbourne (2012–2016), an organisation founded to enhance cross-cultural exchange, awareness and appreciation of art and culture between Thais and Australians. Rushdi is a founding member, with Brook Andrew and Shiraz Bayjoo, of the artist collective The Working Collection.

Alana Hunt (b. 1984, Sydney) makes contemporary art, writes and produces culture through a variety of media across public, gallery and online spaces. She lives on Miriwoong country in the north-west of Australia and has a long-standing engagement with South Asia. The politics of nation making and the colonial past and present of Australia and South Asia are central to her practice. Since 2009, she has orchestrated participatory art and publishing projects that have activated different media forms in the public sphere to shed light on Kashmir. Paper txt msgs from Kashmir (2009–2011) prompted media in India and Pakistan to speak about a state-wide mobile phone ban they had previously been silent on. This work won the Fauvette Laureiro Artist Scholarship. In 2016, the seven-year participatory memorial Cups of nun chai circulated as a newspaper serial in Kashmir, reaching thousands of people on a weekly basis during a period of civilian uprising and state oppression. This work won the 2017 Incinerator Art Award. Her essay, A mere drop in the sea of what is, published by 4A Papers (Issue 1, November 2016), explored the art circulating on the ‘streets of social media’ in Kashmir and made it into the Hansard Report of the Australian Parliament. In 2018, Alana undertook a residency in Sulawesi with Rumata Art Space & the Makassar International Writers’ Festival and will present Cups of nun chai at Tufts University Art Gallery, Massachusetts, and a series of artists presentations at Tufts, Brown, and Parsons universities. Her work is held in both public and private collections including Artbank and the Macquarie Group Collection.

Sarker Protick (b. 1986, Bangladesh) is a Dhaka-based artist whose work explores the possibilities of time, light and sound. His portraits, landscapes and photographic series engage philosophically with the specificities of personal and national histories. Sarker’s approach across various mediums incorporates detailed observations and subtle gestures as a means of creating personal spaces, often minimal and atmospheric. He was named in British Journal of Photography’s annual ‘Ones to Watch’ and Photo District News’ (PDN) 30 emerging photographers of the year. Sarker is the recipient of Joop Swart Masterclass, World Press Photo award, and Australian Photobook of the Year grand prize. His body of work Exodus was awarded the Magnum Foundation Grant 2018. Sarker’s work has been shown in museums, galleries and photo festivals internationally, including Art Dubai; Paris Photo; Singapore Art Week; Dhaka Art Summit; Chobi Mela International Photography Festival, Dhaka; Latvian Contemporary Museum of Photography, Riga; and Noorderlicht International Photofestival, Netherlands. Sarker is a faculty member at Pathshala South Asian Media Institute, Dhaka, and currently represented by East Wing Gallery, Dubai.

 

Exhibition Documentation

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Alana Hunt, Faith in a pile of stones, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, installation incorporating photography, video and sound dimensions variable; archival video appropriated from ‘Ord River Dam’ produced by Film Associates Pty Ltd for Public Works Department WA (currently Water Corporation WA); Photography: B. Lobascher and J.Green; Narration: D. Ellery; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Installation view of Temporary Certainty a t 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, clockwise left to right: Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (f rom the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photographs (selection of 19); 22.5 x 28.0 cm (each photograph); courtesy the artist. Sarker Protick, Arrival (from the series Exodus) , 2015–ongoing, single-channel HD video and sound installation; 8:00 mins; courtesy the artist. Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (from the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photograph; 127.0 x 101.5 cm; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski


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Sarker Protick, Elegy to Empire (from the series Exodus), 2015–ongoing, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, black & white photographs (selection of 19); 22.5 x 28.0 cm (each photograph); courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Installation view of Temporary Certainty a t 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, left to right: Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, Facing Living: The Past in the Present, 2015, single-channel HD video and sound installation; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; 12:30 mins; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

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Rushdi Anwar, We have found in the ashes what we have lost in the fire, 2018, installation view (detail) at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; print on plexiglass, photograph printed on paper, mixed medium, resin embedded within wooden box; 12 boxes: each box 32.5 x 22.5 x 9.0 cm (one edition); installation dimensions variable; commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body; courtesy the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski

 

Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses

SYDNEY. 2 NOVEMBER – 16 DECEMBER 2018.

All Blessings, All Curses presents recent and newly commissioned works by Sydney-based artist, Justine Youssef. Born in the heart of Western Sydney, Youssef’s practice negates the stifling white heat of global xenophobia with deeply personal and universal ruminations that layer the smell, sights and textures of her ancestral homeland, Lebanon.

The strength of Justine Youssef’s practice lies in the poetics of her storytelling and observations: a teacher blackens Arabic script, fearing that it contains a religious hate message; a smoke detector deafeningly sounds as a mother burns bakhoor to rid the house of the evil eye; the looks of confusion two girls receive as they scrub clean a Persian rug in their driveway. These scenes represent the lived experience of the artist who transforms everyday occurrences into visual metaphors.

Justine Youssef’s intuitive methodology draws upon this archive of personal memories as a departure point for All blessing, all curses. Employing sculpture, video, installation and text, Youssef examines the difficult experiences of misunderstanding with the grand subjects of faith, love, family and home. In doing so, she creates immersive experiences that are both epic and intimate – whispering invocations of promise, comfort and resistance.

Justine Youssef (b. 1992) is currently living on the unceded territory of the Darug peoples. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art from the National Art School, Sydney, Australia and is currently working from the Parramatta Artist Studios. She has been awarded the New South Wales Artists’ Grant (NAVA and Create NSW), as well as a studio residency at Blacktown Arts. She has held collaborative solo exhibitions at Seventh Gallery, Melbourne, and Firstdraft, Woolloomooloo with Duha Ali in 2018, and has participated in group exhibitions at Airspace Projects, Marrickville; Bankstown Art Center, Bankstown; Sullivan+Strumpf, Zetland; and Collab Gallery, Chippendale. Her work can be found in the collections of the National Association for the Visual Arts; the National Art School Drawing Archive; and the Sydney Gallery School.

Exhibition Documentation

All images: Kai Wasikowski

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Exterior view of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, In gallery interior: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, dimensions variable, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, dimensions variable, Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Left: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Right: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.
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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. 

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Front left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

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Front left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front right: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Centre Front: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Middle Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Leila El Rayes, Burying that which binds into the chest of my beloved, 2018, photographic documentation (of single channel video, 6 minutes), 2 photographs, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

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Front: Justine Youssef and Leila El Rayes, Burying that which binds into the chest of my beloved, 2018, photographic documentation (of single channel video, 6 minutes), 2 photographs, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.