VIDEO: Journal of Dusk

 

Journal of Dusk is a new performance by Indonesian-Australian artist Jumaadi that has been commissioned especially for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Featuring a series of new shadow puppets created by the artist and accompanied by musical performances, Journal of Dusk draws on a form of traditional Indonesian theatre called wayang kulit to weave poetic narratives based on historical connections between Australia and South-East Asia. Beginning with depictions of agrarian life, Jumaadi presents a montage of imagery from Australia and Indonesia including animals and plants, through to more abstract scenes of landscapes and places.

Journal of Dusk continues Jumaadi’s interest in the history of migration and exchange between Australia and Indonesia during the twentieth century through a creative reinterpretation of the story of the construction of Australia’s first gamelan, an Indonesian percussion instrument. Jumaadi has been investigating historical moments from the period 1927-1949, a time of significant movement of people between Indonesia and Australia, particularly Indonesians held as prisoners in exile some of whom were moved by the Dutch colonial government to Australia during the Second World War. This work is inspired by the story of a Javanese man who produced a gamelan ensemble using scrap metal during his exile in Dutch New Guinea (now a district within the Indonesian province of Papua). The gamelan came to Cowra, NSW, in 1942 and is now held by the University of Melbourne.

Jumaadi is accompanied by co-performers and musicians Margaret Bradley, Cameron Ferguson, Aris Setyo and Kyati Suharto.

Journal of Dusk

Jumaadi, Margaret Bradley, Cameron Ferguson, Aris Setyo and Kyati Suharto.

Friday 16 October 2015, 7pm – Saturday 17 October 2015, 7pm

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Video & Edit: Dara Gill
Co-produced by and © Das Platforms and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2015

Journal of Dusk is commissioned and produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. This project is also supported by the Consulate General of the Republic of Indonesia, Sydney.

VIDEO: 48HR INCIDENT

Running over 48 continuous hours at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 48HR Incident is a program of performance art and live actions initiated or performed by artists from Australia, Asia and the Pacific.

Challenging conceptual and social frameworks that surround the position of the individual in relation to the group, 48HR Incident presents a series of works ranging from artistic interventions through to longer durational performances. Participating artists have drawn upon contested historical narratives, political provocations and social situations to conceive and present works specifically for the context of 4A, taking into account dynamics of space, geography and social relations in and outside of the gallery. 48HR Incident considers the impact of these actions on the decisions that individuals and groups make, avoid or otherwise oppose in the daily act of living.

Conceived as the third and final component of MASS GROUP INCIDENT, 48HR Incident is in many ways a culmination of the discussion that occurred during the development of this broader curatorial project, in particular how ephemeral, interdisciplinary and performative artforms embody real social conditions or frictions. 
48HR Incident is a call to action, a test of audiences’ will and commitment to meet the challenges that artists present them, and an admission that at the irreducible core of any collective actions or movement is the latent power of the individual.

48HR Incident

Frances Barrett, Dadang Christanto, Blak Douglas, JD Reforma, Tony Schwensen, Abdullah M. I Syed, Latai Taumoepeau, Salote Tawale, Wok the Rock & Lara Thoms, & Samson Young.

Friday 29 May 2015, 6pm – Sunday 31 May 2015, 6pm

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Video & Edit: Dara Gill
Interview: Pedro de Almeida and Toby Chapman
Co-produced by and © Das Platforms and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2015

48HR Incident is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body; supported by the City of Sydney Cultural Grants Program; and supported by Museums & Galleries NSW and Gordon Darling Foundation. Lara Thoms and Wok The Rock’s project ‘Jakarta Whiplash ’93 Re-Revisited’ was developed during a residency in Yogyakarta as part of Gertrude Contemporary’s Indonesia/Australia exchange project #banyakbanyak.

VIDEO: TELL ME MY TRUTH

Tell Me My Truth seeks to address persistent and often contentious relationships that frame the individual within the group. Exploring the motivations of artists for whom a questioning of the veracity of the status quo is a defining aspect of their practice, Tell Me My Truth presents works that give form to alternative narratives.Contrasting fiction with the documentary, remembrance with negation, responsibility with impunity, and privacy with surveillance within the public realm, Tell Me My Truth is at once a provocative demand and an admission of the futility of splendid isolation in a world that more than ever is defined by our connectedness. This is the second exhibition instalment of MASS GROUP INCIDENT, a major five-month multi-stage project curated and produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Comprising a series of exhibitions, site-specific projects, performances, film screenings and public programs, this broader project’s central theme is the power and limits of social engagement and collective action as experienced by the individual. Within this construct, Tell Me My Truth takes a more analytical and meditative approach in its investigation of the causes of social friction and mutual understanding.

Tell Me My Truth
Simon Fujiwara, Helen Grace, Amala Groom, Fx Harsono, He Xiangyu, James Newitt, Tony Schwensen, John Von Sturmer
27 March – 16 May 2015
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

VIDEO: HAZE

 

Haze is an exhibition of new work by Australian artists Tully Arnot, Sarah Contos and Jensen Tjhung. Together, these three artists undertook 4A’s inaugual Beijing Studio Program at the studios of Chinese-Australian artist Shen Shaomin in Huairou on the northern outskirts of Beijing in September 2013. In this video the artists’ discuss the highlights and challenges of living and working on the fringes of the Chinese capital, and the way in which the experience played into the works exhibited at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art  between 22 August – 25 October 2014. 

 

Yangjiang Group on Actions for Tomorrow

Actions for Tomorrow is the first solo exhibition in Australia of Yangjiang Group, the Chinese artist collective that use the medium of calligraphy as a conceptual springboard into a diverse range of installations and performances. Hailing from Yangjiang, a coastal city in Guangdong province, Yangjiang Group comprises of three key members – Zheng Guogu, Chen Zaiyan and Sun Qinglin – as well as a number of collaborators from their hometown. In this video Yangjiang Group introduce their practice and their solo exhibition at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art held 17 January – 7 March 2015.

 

 

Zheng Guogu in conversation with Aaron Seeto, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

 

A conversation between acclaimed Chinese artist Zheng Guogu (郑国谷) and Aaron Seeto, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on 30 October 2014.

Zheng Guogu is internationally recognised for producing large-scale installations and architectural interventions that highlight the absurd and often ironic connections between traditional Chinese culture and everyday life. He works both independently and as a leading member of the Chinese contemporary art collective, Yangjiang Group, based in the coastal city of Yangjiang in the Pearl River Delta in Guangdong province. As part of a generation of Chinese artists who have been affected by the explosion of global market forces, Zheng’s art practice questions the meaning of calligraphy, painting, performance and architecture in our globalised contexts.

In this talk Zheng Guogu discusses the emergence of Yangjiang Group during the early 2000s; the artistic strategies employed by the group living outside the key centres of artistic production in China; and their idiosyncratic perspective on the relationship between culture and everyday activities such as gambling, gaming, drinking tea, calligraphy, food and built environments. Zheng also talks about previous projects by Yangjiang Group and the development of a major new project for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art presented in January 2015.

 


The conversation is presented in association with University of Sydney China Studies Centre.


About Zheng Guogu’s visit
Zheng Guogu will be in Sydney undertaking a site visit at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and the Chinese Garden of Friendship in Darling Harbour where the Yangjiang Group will exhibit and perform in a special project to take place in early 2015. You can participate and support this major project by supporting 4A’s Kickstarter crowdfunding Initiative to bring these artists to Australia.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/4acentre/actions-for-tomorrow

 



Yangjiang Group – Actions for Tomorrow is produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art with the support of the Chinese Garden of Friendship, The Australia Council for the Arts, City of Sydney and the Australia-China Council.

Click through to the 4A Kickstarter campaign

 


VIDEO: Cosmin Costinas: A Journal of the Plague Year: A Case Study of Para/Site Art Space, Hong Kong.

Cosmin Costinas
A Journal of the Plague Year: A Case Study of Para/Site Art Space, Hong Kong.

This talk will present an insight into recent research and projects by Cosmin Costinas for Para/Site Art Space, Hong Kong. Para/Site is Hong Kong’s leading contemporary art space and one of the oldest and most active independent art centres in Asia. It produces exhibitions, publications and discursive projects aimed at forging a critical understanding of local and international phenomena in art and society.
 
Since 2011 Cosmin Costinas has been the Executive Director and Curator of Para/Site, where he has delivered a number of exhibitions that discuss and explore local political and historical contexts. Costinas will discuss a number of the challenges in presenting these projects, and consider how they fit within broader curatorial conversations in Hong Kong.
 
As a relative newcomer to Hong Kong, Cosmin will also speak about his personal perspective in developing exhibitions and the role that collaboration plays in working in a new cultural context. What kind of responsibility does a curator, or indeed an organisation, have to the local?

 

This talk was presented as part of the 4A’s Curators’ Intensive 2014. More here

 

4A_icon_pos                    CF_Logo_BW - new with CA

The Curators’ Intensive is an initiative of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and has been made possible with the support of Sue Acret & James Roth and the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund. 4A acknowledges the support of the Northern Centre for Contemporary Art.

VIDEO: Sophie McIntyre: Politics, Art & Representation: Curatorship in an intercultural context

Dr Sophie McIntyre
Politics, Art & Representation: Curatorship in an intercultural context

This presentation explores the spatial and relational dynamics of curating exhibitions in an intercultural context by focussing on the meaning and significance of place in a geo-political, cultural, artistic and museological context. Drawing on several exhibitions  of contemporary art from the Asia-Pacific region that Dr. McIntyre has (co)curated, the presentation will delve into the politics of cultural representation and it will reflect on some of the challenges and valuable insights gained when curating across and between different cultures and audiences.

 

This talk was presented as part of the 4A’s Curators’ Intensive 2014. More here

 

4A_icon_pos                    CF_Logo_BW - new with CA

The Curators’ Intensive is an initiative of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and has been made possible with the support of Sue Acret & James Roth and the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund. 4A acknowledges the support of the Northern Centre for Contemporary Art.

 

VIDEO: Robin Peckham: Tracing the Post-Internet

 

Robin Peckham
Tracing the Post-Internet: A Case Study in Curatorial Process

What are the relationships between the movement that has come to be called ‘post-internet’ and the media realities of the historical moment that enables it?  This talk will present the curatorial process and research behind the exhibition Art Post-Internet co-curated by Peckham, paying close attention to the differences between survey methodologies and thematic approaches. Peckham will respond to notions including the differences between intent and effect in artistic practice, the tension between documentation and materiality in recent art, collaboration as a tool, the specificities of the exhibition and other possible realisations, and categories of curatorial work from essayistic narrative compositions to forms of analysis.  This presentation will tentatively structure a logic by which we might be able to expand a thematic understanding of post-internet art based on an empirical understanding of its social core.

 

This talk was presented as part of the 4A’s Curators’ Intensive 2014. More here

 

4A_icon_pos                    CF_Logo_BW - new with CA

The Curators’ Intensive is an initiative of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and has been made possible with the support of Sue Acret & James Roth and the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund. 4A acknowledges the support of the Northern Centre for Contemporary Art.

VIDEO: WAYS: OMAR CHOWDHURY

Ways is the first solo exhibition by Australian artist Omar Chowdhury. Chowdhury has spent the past two years working in the country of his birth and one of the most densely populated on earth, whose character is deeply informed by religious faiths and daily acts of worship. There, he has created an ambitious new body of work, which traverses urban and rural terrains searching for material embodiments of spiritual transcendence.

Chowdhury produces large-scale and richly detailed moving image works filmed on location in Bangladesh during extended periods of immersion in various cultural and physical landscapes.

 

Video: Lindy Lee on 4A

“One of the important things about art
is its capacity to make us to reflect upon who we are… 4A does this through its entire program.”

Lindy Lee, artist and former 4A President

Lindy Lee, a leading contemporary Australian artist, became a 4A Member not long after 4A’s establishment. She remains a passionate supporter of 4A and its ideals – working with young artists, creating better awareness of Chinese-Australian history and culture and the valuable connections between Australia and Asia.

 

Video: Co-Produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Das Platforms

Video: Edmund Capon on the role of Asia

 “The arts of Asia have always been an absolute passion of mine. 4A deals so much with contemporary life: it’s about bringing the art of Asia here now, so that we can get that rapport and communication with the creative spirits around us in the Asian region.”

“You cannot imagine anything more important and pertinent to a place like Sydney and Australia than to get involved with Asia culturally, socially and economically and to underwrite all that with a certain cultural sensitivity – that’s what the arts has the power to do.”

Edmund Capon, Chair of 4A discusses the role of Asia to Australia.

Video: Co-Produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Das Platforms

Video: Archive As Verb: Hammad Nasar

In this special keynote presentation Hammad Nasar discusses recent and ongoing projects that he and his colleagues have developed at the Hong Kong-based Asia Art Archive, one of the world’s leading public collections of primary and secondary source material about contemporary art in Asia, as well as his curatorial work with Green Cardamom.
Hammad addresses the idea of archive as verb: a dynamic process that looks beyond the physical aspects of material culture towards the actions that engagement with archives can enable. How can artists, curators, researchers, educators, students and the broader public generate new ideas, works and individual responses that continually reshape the archive itself? What does it mean to enrich and complicate histories that are told through the archive by means of active engagement? What are the responsibilities of collecting organisations towards public accessibility, public education and the historical and political implications of facilitating others to challenge dominant global art historical narratives?
Hammad connects this theme and his current work with Asia Art Archive with his experiences in producing curatorial projects at Green Cardamom, a London-based not-for-profit organisation that focuses on art from South and West Asia and which he co-founded.

Hammad Nasar is co-hosted by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with the Australia Council for the Arts Visual Arts Section through its International Visitors Program.

               

 

Hammad Nasar is a curator, writer and Head of Research and Programmes at the Hong Kong-based Asia Art Archive. Earlier he co-founded the non-profit arts organisation Green Cardamom, London, that focuses on art from South and West Asia and has a commitment to exhibition-led enquiry. Hammad has curated or co-curated numerous international exhibitions and symposia, including: Karkhana: A Contemporary Collaboration, Johnson Museum, Cornell University (2012, Ithaca, USA) and Nasher Museum, Duke University (2013, Durham, USA); Drawn from Life, Abbott Hall Art Gallery (2011, Kendal, UK); Beyond the Page: The Miniature as Attitude in Contemporary Art from Pakistan (Pacific Asia Museum (2010, Pasadena, USA); Lines of Control: Partition as a Productive Space, Cornell University (2012, Ithaca, USA); and Where Three Dreams Cross: 150 Years of Photography from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, Whitechapel Gallery and Fotomuseum Winterthur (2010, London, UK and Winterthur, Switzerland). Hammad plays an advisory role for various arts organisations including Delfina Foundation (UK), Rhode Island School of Design (USA) and San Art (Vietnam). He was a Fellow of the UK’s Clore Leadership Programme and Research Fellow at Goldsmiths College, London.
Asia Art Archive (AAA) was initiated in 2000 in response to the urgent need to document and secure the multiple recent histories of contemporary art in the Asia region. With research posts in China, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Taiwan, AAA has collated one of the most valuable collections of material on contemporary art in the region. Built of 85% donated material, the collection now holds over 34,000 records, comprised of hundreds of thousands of physical and digital items, and it continues to grow. Through collecting and making information on the recent history of contemporary art in Asia easily accessible, AAA offers a range of programmes for educators, youth and young adults, and other members in the community, with the goal of becoming the definitive arts resource and library for the Hong Kong public, particularly educators and students.

Video: Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook: Storytellers of the Town

Storytellers of the Town is an exhibition of work by Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook spanning two decades. Araya is one of Thailand’s foremost contemporary artists, whose practice is concerned with the fundamental aspects of life and death, collective experiences of history and fate, and the configuring of self through the redeployment of everyday images and situations. Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook: Storytellers of the Town includes seminal installation and video works, a number of which have never been presented outside of Thailand.

Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook: Storytellers of the Town
14 March – 10 May, 2014
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
Interview: Clare Veal
Subtitles: Phaptawan Suwannakudt
Video: Co-Produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Das Platforms

Video: Vertical Villages: ruangrupa ArtLab & Keg de Souza

Curator Toby Chapman, artists Keg de Souza and Reza Afisina and
Hauritsa (ruangrupa ArtLab) with interntational student Jeffry Santony discuss Vertical Villages

Vertical Villages is a collaborative partnership between ruangrupa ArtLab (Indonesia), Keg de Souza (Australia) and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (Australia) working with the international student population living in Sydney’s CBD.

Vertical Villages is the first time that ruangrupa have worked in Sydney and by collaborating with Keg de Souza this project represents a unique, organic and process-driven experiment that will culminate in an exhibition at 4A that will be incorporated as part of the 15th Jakarta Biennale in November 2014.

Follow the project blog verticalvillages.tumblr.com

Vertical Villages
Ruangrupa & Keg De Souza
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
6 SEPTEMBER — 26 OCTOBER 2013

Vertical Villages is supported by the Australian Government through the Australia International Cultural Council, an initiative of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Video/Interviews by Nick Garner, Rococo Productions
© 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and Rococo Productions

Video: One Year: Zhang Rui

Chinese-born artist Zhang Rui (瑞) talks about her new collection of paintings in the exhibition, One Year (一年).

Having moved to Sydney one year ago, the body of work in One Year portrays Rui’s development of a visual language working across the context of her experiences of China and Australia. Faced with new physical and psychological environments, the artist’s new work draws on a vast array of images – usually sourced from the internet – as a means of reading or engaging with her surroundings. The results are dense and at times visually cryptic paintings that subtly combine the autobiographical with political threads and interweave personal and social worlds.

Zhang Rui (张 瑞)  was born in 1983 in Tianjin, China and graduated from the Department of Painting, Tianjin Academy of Fine Arts. She has presented work internationally, both in China and Europe, including the solo exhibition Freedom We Need, Laden No.5 Gallery, Bad Ems (2011). Rui has also participated in a number of group exhibitions including Fang – then there was no more living room, 978 Art District, Beijing (2007); Xu Ni, Cao Chang Di Art Space, Beijing (2008) and Mud, curated by Ai Weiwei, China Art Archives & Warehouse, Beijing. Rui met Weiwei as a participant in his acclaimed project, Fairytale, presented as part of dOCUMENTA (12), Kassel, Germany (2007).

VIDEO: What the Birds Knew: Ken + Julia Yonetani

Ken + Julia Yonetani talk about their latest artworks in 4A’s exhibition, What the Birds Knew (3 August – 3 November 2012) and how the use of Uranium Glass as a material in these works relate to our sense of allure to the power of electricity and technology. In the wake of the Fukushima disaster in Japan last year they also convey how through this exhibition they hope to manifest the fear of radiation in contemporary Japan and parallel the cultural anxieties shared between the Japanese, and Indigenous Australians through the Aboriginal story of the Green Ant Dreaming.

 

 

 

Performance: Dadang Christanto, Litsus

Performance: August 12, 2009
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney

The title of this performance refers to the repressive and anti-democratic legislation enacted by the Suharto regime in 1990, ‘Litsus’ required all prospective members of parliament to undergo a test to determine whether or not they held ‘communist sympathies’. Christanto performed Litsus underneath his 2009 installation, Cost of Dreams.

 

 

 

Aaron Seeto – Introduction to New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown, produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with City of Sydney, examined the role of public space in Chinatown, using the specific idea of a garden as an initial proposal for a public art project.

In his introduction Aaron Seeto, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, articulates his principle aim for the forum as a means to begin a public discussion on ideas, processes and concerns regarding new approaches to public art – and specifically the idea of a ‘new century garden’ in the proposed site of Thomas Street – particularly in regards to multidisciplinary ways of working that may allow for artists, designers, architects, planners and communities to come together in innovative and mutually rewarding contexts. In addition, Aaron touches upon the cultural context of Chinatown, its inhabitants, topography, and his personal connections to the area.

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown was presented at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Friday 21 October 2011

Aaron Seeto on “New Century Garden” and Public Art in Chinatown

Aaron Seeto, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, talks about his curatorial vision for a multidisciplinary, experimental public garden work for Sydney’s Chinatown.

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown, produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with City of Sydney, examines the role of public space in Chinatown, using the specific idea of a garden as an initial proposal for a public art project.

The principle aim of the forum is to begin a public discussion on ideas, processes and concerns regarding new approaches to public art, particularly in regards to multidisciplinary ways of working that may allow for artists, designers, architects, planners and communities to come together in innovative and mutually rewarding contexts.

New Century Garden: Bridget Smyth, Design Director at City of Sydney, on the City’s plans to revitalise the city centre by testing new approaches to shaping public space.

Bridget Smyth, Design Director at City of Sydney, on the City’s plans to revitalise the city centre by testing new approaches to shaping public space.

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown, produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with City of Sydney, examines the role of public space in Chinatown, using the specific idea of a garden as an initial proposal for a public art project.

The principle aim of the forum is to begin a public discussion on ideas, processes and concerns regarding new approaches to public art, particularly in regards to multidisciplinary ways of working that may allow for artists, designers, architects, planners and communities to come together in innovative and mutually rewarding contexts.

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown is presented at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Friday 21 October 2011.

Dr Xing Ruan, Guest Speaker – New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown, produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with City of Sydney, examined the role of public space in Chinatown, using the specific idea of a garden as an initial proposal for a public art project.

Guest speaker Dr Xing Ruan’s presentation explores the relationship between garden and house in pre-modern Chinese architecture, and asks whether or not the Chinese idea of a garden possesses the necessary ‘anatomy’ to be transformed into a civic place.

Dr Xing Ruan is an author and Professor of Architecture, University of New South Wales, Sydney.

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown was presented at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Friday 21 October 2011

Nicholas Jose, guest speaker – New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown

Guest speaker Nicholas Jose’s presentation, What is a (Chinese) Garden?, explores the art of gardens in Chinese culture that continues long, rich, highly evolved traditions of philosophy, aesthetics, ethics and everyday practice. A garden is a conceptual as well as a physical space, a constructed environment, a zone of play or meditative transcendence. The experience of the garden through the body, mind and heart of the person who enters it is central to understanding what a garden can be. In Chinese tradition this takes distinctive forms: a space apart, a space within. As these concepts are translated and adapted to a new context, urban, 21st century, Australian, public, they are reinvented by transnational citizens of the present who give new potential to civic space. Art is an agent in this transformation, including the writing of the garden by scholars and imaginative authors, as they create what critic Wang Guanglin, speaking of Brian Castro’s novel The Garden Book, has called ‘the garden of transcultural life’.

Nicholas Jose is a novelist and Professor, Writing and Society Research Group, University of Western Sydney.

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown was presented at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Friday 21 October 2011

John Choi, Guest Speaker – New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown

 

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown, produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with City of Sydney, examined the role of public space in Chinatown, using the specific idea of a garden as an initial proposal for a public art project.

Guest speaker John Choi’s presentation posits that public art is increasingly embedded to place making and urban renewal strategies, and that this tactic brings to the fore, the complex fertile ground that exists between art, public space, economy and identity. In his talk John explores these thoughts through the lens of ‘new century garden’ and his personal connections and observations of urban areas in Seoul, Korea.

John Choi is a Founding Partner of Choi Ropiha Fighera architects.

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown was presented at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Friday 21 October 2011.

 

 

Felicity Fenner, Guest Speaker – New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown, produced by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with City of Sydney, examined the role of public space in Chinatown, using the specific idea of a garden as an initial proposal for a public art project.

Felicity Fenner is Chief Curator, National Institute for Experimental Arts, and Senior Lecturer, School of Art History and Education, College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales.

New Century Garden: Talking About Public Art in Chinatown was presented at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art on Friday 21 October 2011

Perspectives on Curating & Programming: Beyond the Edge of Elsewhere


Who would’ve thought curating and programming could be a dangerous profession? John Kirkman, Aaron Seeto and Lisa Havilah give us their perspective on what drives their work, the processes and challenges behind programming for an art gallery or cultural institution including the role of the artist and captivating your audience.

They discuss strategies that engage artists with local communities through specific projects like the Edge of Elsewhere, a collaborative curatorial program produced for the Sydney Festival by Campbelltown Arts Centre in partnership with 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art.

These interviews were recorded at COFA on the 5th April as part of the free COFA Talks public lecture series.

See more Talks at http://online.cofa.unsw.edu.au.