Chapter One: Thinking through it

PEACOCK GALLERY, AUBURN. 15 September – 21 October 2018.

Opening: Saturday 15 September 2018, 1:30 – 3:30pm.

As part of the 2018 Curators’ Intensive presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art two emerging curators have been selected to curate an exhibition at Peacock Gallery.

Chapter One: Thinking through it is a project curated by Sabrina Baker that exists as a reading room, research space and open studio. Artists have contributed things that influence their working methods and you’re invited to dive into their practice through the stacks of books taken from bedside tables and studio desks, the photographs, knick knacks and stuff that feeds into the development of their work.

Hannah Donnelly, Thea Jones, Shivanjani Lal, Nikki Lam, Anja Loughhead, Stephen Pham, and Jason Phu work with different materials and methods to craft works that explore place in relation to the self.

Each of the artists explore themes of personal identity and myth making with a grounding in being both inside and outside of their local environments – where they are now and where they have been before.

Please Explain: ‘Census, Map, Museum’

SYDNEY. SATURDAY 1 SEPTEMBER 2018

| Moderator: Pedro DE ALMEIDA

| Speakers: Rushdi ANWAR; Alana HUNT; Associate Professor Phillip GEORGE; Djon MUNDINE, OAM; Sarker PROTICK

| 4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. Responding to Temporary Certainty presented at 4A this edition of Please Explain seeks to examine ideas and issues around nationalisms, sovereignty and memorialisation.

Join artists Rushdi Anwar, Alana Hunt and Sarker Protick alongside speakers Associate Professor Philip George and Djon Mundine OAM who will take a key premise articulated by political scientist and historian Benedict Anderson in his seminal text Imagined Communities (1983) as a jumping off point for a broad discussion.

Reading Recommendations:

 

Speaker Profiles:

| Pedro DE ALMEIDA 

| Pedro is Program Manager at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and exhibition curator, Temporary Certainty.

| Rushdi ANWAR 

| Rushdi Anwar (b. Halabja, Kurdistan) is a Melbourne-based artist, currently working between Australia and Thailand. His installation, sculpture, painting, photo-painting and video work often reflect on socio-political issues relating to Kurdistan, Iraq and the Middle East. He explores these issues through an investigation of form, utilising a material vocabulary and different processes of making. Anwar was educated in Kurdistan and Australia, studying at the Institute of Kirkuk- Kurdistan and Enmore Design Centre/Sydney Institute. He holds a Master of Fine Art (2010) and a PhD in Fine Art (2016) from RMIT University, Melbourne. He has held solo and group exhibitions widely in Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Kurdistan, Norway, Switzerland, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and USA. Recent and upcoming exhibitions include 12th Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2018), and the 13th Havana Biennial, Cuba (2019). Anwar’s works are held in the collections of the Australian War Memorial, the Kurdistan Regional Government, and in private collections. He has curated exhibitions in Kurdistan (2010), Thailand (2012, 2015), and Australia (2013). Following several artist-in-residence programs in Thailand, he co-founded and co-coordinated the Australian Thai Artist Interchange, Melbourne (2012–2016), an organisation founded to enhance cross-cultural exchange, awareness and appreciation of art and culture between Thais and Australians. Rushdi is a founding member, with Brook Andrew and Shiraz Bayjoo, of the artist collective The Working Collection.

| Alana HUNT 

| Alana Hunt (b. 1984, Sydney) makes contemporary art, writes and produces culture through a variety of media across public, gallery and online spaces. She lives on Miriwoong country in the north-west of Australia and has a long-standing engagement with South Asia. The politics of nation making and the colonial past and present of Australia and South Asia are central to her practice. Since 2009, she has orchestrated participatory art and publishing projects that have activated different media forms in the public sphere to shed light on Kashmir. Paper txt msgs from Kashmir (2009–2011) prompted media in India and Pakistan to speak about a state-wide mobile phone ban they had previously been silent on. This work won the Fauvette Laureiro Artist Scholarship. In 2016, the seven-year participatory memorial Cups of nun chaicirculated as a newspaper serial in Kashmir, reaching thousands of people on a weekly basis during a period of civilian uprising and state oppression. This work won the 2017 Incinerator Art Award. Her essay, A mere drop in the sea of what is, published by 4A Papers (Issue 1, November 2016), explored the art circulating on the ‘streets of social media’ in Kashmir and made it into the Hansard Report of the Australian Parliament. In 2018, Alana undertook a residency in Sulawesi with Rumata Art Space & the Makassar International Writers’ Festival and will present Cups of nun chai at Tufts University Art Gallery, Massachusetts, and a series of artists presentations at Tufts, Brown, and Parsons universities. Her work is held in both public and private collections including Artbank and the Macquarie Group Collection.

| Associate Professor Phillip GEORGE  

| UNSW’s Associate Professor Phillip George’s practice operates across zones of cultural difference, exploring and making connections between the complexities that exist between East and West. His work draws connections between Australian beach culture and the fractured, turbulent zones of the Middle East. George has exhibited widely over the past thirty years with exhibitions throughout Australia, Europe, America and Asia. In 2008 George produced his seminal exhibition, Borderlands at the Casula Powerhouse in Sydney, NSW. His work is in private and public collections in Australia and internationally.

| Speaker: Djon MUNDINE OAM  

| Djon Mundine OAM, member of the Bandjalung people of northern New South Wales, is a curator, writer, artist and activist. He has held prominent curatorial positions in many national and international institutions, including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and Queensland Art Gallery. Between 1979 and 1995 he was the Art Advisor at Milingimbi and Ramingining in the Northern Territory. He was the concept artist of the Aboriginal Memorial at the National Gallery of Australia in 1988. In 1993 he received the Medal of the Order of Australia for service to the promotion and development of Aboriginal arts, crafts and culture. In 2005-2006 he was Research Professor at The National Museum of Ethnology (Minpaku) in Osaka, Japan. He is currently an independent curator of contemporary Indigenous art.

| Speaker: Sarker PROTICK

| Sarker Protick (b. 1986, Bangladesh) is a Dhaka-based artist whose work explores the possibilities of time, light and sound. His portraits, landscapes and photographic series engage philosophically with the specificities of personal and national histories. Sarker’s approach across various mediums incorporates detailed observations and subtle gestures as a means of creating personal spaces, often minimal and atmospheric. He was named in British Journal of Photography’s annual ‘Ones to Watch’ and Photo District News’ (PDN) 30 emerging photographers of the year. Sarker is the recipient of Joop Swart Masterclass, World Press Photo award, and Australian Photobook of the Year grand prize. His body of work Exodus was awarded the Magnum Foundation Grant 2018. Sarker’s work has been shown in museums, galleries and photo festivals internationally, including Art Dubai; Paris Photo; Singapore Art Week; Dhaka Art Summit; Chobi Mela International Photography Festival, Dhaka; Latvian Contemporary Museum of Photography, Riga; and Noorderlicht International Photofestival, Netherlands. Sarker is a faculty member at Pathshala South Asian Media Institute, Dhaka, and currently represented by East Wing Gallery, Dubai.

BOOK LAUNCH: Imagining Taiwan: The Role of Art in Taiwan’s Quest for Identity by Sophie McIntyre

SYDNEY // Monday July 2 // 12.30 – 1.30

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is delighted to host the launch of Dr Sophie McIntyre’s new book Imagining Taiwan: The Role of Art in Taiwan’s Quest for Identity.

Taiwan’s quest for identity and international recognition has been the most important and fiercely contested issue for nearly half century, both nationally and internationally. Imagining Taiwan is the first in-depth and comprehensive study, published in English, which critically explores the pivotal role played by the visual arts in Taiwan’s identity discourse. Drawing on 25 years of research, Sophie McIntyre analyses the ways in which identity narratives have been imagined, interpreted and transmitted, locally and globally, through the production, selection, display and reception of Taiwan art. This book focuses on the post-martial law era, a transformative period when democratisation gave rise to a heightened sense of Taiwanese consciousness, and a growing awareness of Taiwan’s place in the world. Artists, curators, art critics and scholars in Taiwan actively engaged in identity issues in unique, and often subversive ways. The author reveals how, with the turn of the new millennium, identity discourses in the visual arts shifted, from a Taiwan-centred narrative into a transnational vision embracing local, regional and global perspectives. Imagining Taiwan brings together primary and archival sources, and nearly 200 images, many published for the first time. It is an essential reference for specialists and students in art, curatorship, museums, and Taiwan and China studies, and it will also appeal to those seeking a greater understanding of the wider region.

Sophie McIntyre is a scholar and curator of art from the Asia-Pacific, with expertise in art from Greater China. She received her PhD from the Australian National University (2013) and has lectured and held fellowships in universities in Australia, Taiwan, China and Hong Kong. She has also curated more than 30 exhibitions, several of which featured art from Taiwan. Her texts have been widely published in books, journals, and catalogues in Australia and internationally

SNACKCHAT: Bankstown Poetry Slam

SYDNEY // Thursday May 17 2018 // 6.30-8.00PM (Bar opens from 6pm)

Bankstown Poetry Slam, recognised widely as the largest regular poetry slam in Australia, brings to 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art a BPS style slam in the heart of Sydney. As one of the final programs in the SNACKCHAT series presented for the Biennale of Sydney join us for a snacks, drinks and slam. With 5 randomly chosen members of the audience judging the performances, the poets will have the stage and 3 minutes to win the crowd over with their clever wordsmithery. The evening will also feature a guest poet, stay tuned for details.

RSVP now.

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SNACKCHAT is a new series of events by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, creating conversations about Sydney’s diverse cultural fabric over shared snacks from different community groups.

Please Explain: Australia’s fear of multilingualism

SYDNEY // Thursday 7 June 2018 // 6-8PM
4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
4A’s series Please Explain invites presenters to rethink, recharge and reimagine contemporary issues through the arts and academia. Responding to Akira Tayakama’s Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project presented at 4A as part of the Biennale of Sydney this edition of Please Explain is curated by Dr Elly Kent.
Australia seems to be quite happily multicultural but very comfortable being mono-lingual. Despite being a country of hundreds of languages our education system remains steadfastly focused on cursary study of languages that is not interwoven throughout primary and tertiary education. As a result we remain a nation that fails to celebrate our cultures through language and we fail to prepare our next generations to be global citizens. Where do we go from here?
Join 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art for a robust debate.
Speakers: poet/writer Lorna Munro;  Kevin Ngo, poet and Bankstown Poetry Slam organiser; Jane Stratton of LOST IN BOOKS, and linguist Asefeh Zeinalabedini.
Moderator: Dr Elly Kent
Want to bone up on the conversation before the night? Please see our recommended reading here.
Missed the event? Listen to the audio recording below:

*Image courtesy of the Biennale of Sydney. Document Photography.

SNACK CHAT with Chun Yin Rainbow Chan with participants from Akira Takayama’s ​Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project

SYDNEY // Thursday 5 April // 6.00PM – 7.00PM

Be part of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art’s Biennale of Sydney program SNACKCHAT . Partake in a conversation about the cultural fabric of Sydney with participant’s from Akira Takayama’s video work Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Theatre while enjoying some snacks from Hong Kong.

For this edition of SNACKCHAT Chun Yin Rainbow Chan and her mother Irene Chan reperform their songs from Akira Takayama’s Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Theatre and step you through a history of their family in Hong Kong. Accompanied by a visual presentation this is a SNACKCHAT not to miss!

This event is presented in collaboration with the 21st Biennale of Sydney.

Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, pictured with her mum Irene Chan. Photo: 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art
Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, pictured with her mum Irene Chan. Photo: 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

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SNACKCHAT is a new series of events by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, creating conversations about Sydney’s diverse cultural fabric over shared snacks from different community groups.

Image: Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Theatre, 2018. Courtesy the artist and the Biennale of Sydney.

Community Offering: The Burrangong Affray

YOUNG, NSW. 21 April. From 10am

On April 21, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art led a community event with Australian-Chinese artists Jason Phu and John Young Zerunge in response the to events of The Burrangong Affray, including the Lambing Flat Riots, 1860 -1861.

We invited the community of Young and the surrounding areas to join the artists as they create a tribute at Chinese Cemetery, Murrumburrah and Blackguard Gully, Young. At each site the artists will lead us in a ceremony of incense burning, offerings and ceremonial gestures to welcome good luck and banish the bad spirits of the past.

Community members joined the artists as they pay tribute to these sites and these historic events.

This event forms part The Burrangong Affray: Jason Phu & John Young Zerunge exhibition.

Images below capture part of the day’s performance processes and events. All images: 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:

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Top image: Currawong Farm. Photo: Jason Phu.

4A x Para Site at Melbourne Art Book Fair

Friday 16 – Sunday 18 March, 2018
Melbourne Art Book Fair
National Gallery of Victoria

Since its launch in 2015, the annual Melbourne Art Book Fair has attracted more than 50,000 visitors making it the most visited publishing event in the Asia-Pacific region.

The fourth Melbourne Art Book Fair in 2018 will bring together international and local publishers and practitioners in a weekend of free talks, book launches, performances, and stalls featuring art, design, architecture and photography publications from around the world.

Opening Hours
Friday 16 March: 10am – 5pm and 6 – 9pm
Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 March: 10am – 5pm

Para Site is Hong Kong’s leading contemporary art centre and one of the oldest and most active independent art institutions in Asia. It produces exhibitions, publications, discursive, and educational projects aimed at forging a critical understanding of local and international phenomena in art and society.

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (4A) is an independent not-for-profit organisation based in Sydney, Australia. 4A fosters excellence and innovation in contemporary culture through the commissioning, presentation, documentation and research of contemporary art. Our program is presented throughout Australia and Asia , where we ensure that contemporary art plays a central role in understanding and developing the dynamic relationship between Australia and the wider Asian region.

4A Night Walk

SYDNEY — THURSDAY 1 FEBRUARY 2018 — 6.00PM

Experience China town’s food culture and public art under the the evening glow of its neon lights.

As part of the City of Sydney’s Sydney Chinese New Year Festival celebrations, 4A will lead a evening tour of Sydney’s China town that includes a brief history of its public art and magnetic regional cuisine.

The tour will also include a private tour of 4A’s exhibition, ‘Equal Area‘.

Image courtesy Lukezemephotography, Flickr. Image used under a Creative Commons License. 

Congee Breakfast Tour – Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area

SYDNEY — SATURDAY 17 FEBRUARY — 10.00AM – 12:00PM

Join the 4A team on a morning tour of the heart of Sydney’s Chinatown, it’s art and magnetic regional cuisine.

As part of Lunar New Year celebrations, 4A will lead a morning tour of Sydney’s Chinatown that includes it’s public art and it’s magnetic regional cuisine.

The tour will include a private tour of 4A’s exhibition, ‘Equal Area‘ and culminate with a traditional Taiwanese congee breakfast.

Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area

SYDNEY. 20 JANUARY – 25 FEBRUARY 2018

Lee Kun-Yong with Australian artists Huseyin Sami, Daniel Von Sturmer and Emily Parsons-Lord.

Equal Area presents the work of Lee Kun-Yong, one of Korea’s most seminal conceptual artists, charting the development of his visual and theoretical methodology that has expanded possibilities for performance art since the 1970s. Lee is widely acclaimed for his innovative series of performances that examine the the connection between the logic of the mind and the gestures of the body. Throughout his career, Lee has investigated the connection between the human psyche and action through the act of performance and performance. His performances often test this relationship through the act of repetition, demonstrating how the construct of logic is subjective to its locale — slight shifts in each performance capture the body within present moments, leaving traces of an ‘event’.

In this unique presentation of photographic documentation of performances spanning his almost six-decade career, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art brings Lee Kun-Yong’s practice into dialogue with three contemporary Australian artists. Equal Area opens with a special performance of Snail’s Gallop, one of his most critically lauded works which he is staging in Australia for the first time. This is followed by a series of performances and live interventions by Australian artists, taking place in dialogue with the residue of Lee’s performances, that build on this examination of the repeated gesture and elucidate Lee’s influence on global contemporary performative practice.

 


 

Lee Kun-Yong (b. 1942, Sariwon, Korea; lives and works in Gunsan, Korea) is one of Korea’s most seminal conceptual artists, exploring the nexus between the human mind and its connection to the world. His experimental performative practice emerged in 1970s South Korea, a period where the country was marked by diminished civil rights and martial law, including civilian assembly controls and tightly scrutinised codes of social propriety. Through this period, Lee led numerous artistic responses to the political climate, creating subversive automated drawing experiments that made subtle yet identifiable comments on the authoritarian state. He continues his line of experimentation today, collaborating with new artists and bringing his messaging into the 21st century.

Lee Kun-Yong’s exhibition history includes: Experimental Art of Suwon in the 1980–1990s: It’s Not Quite That (2017), Suwon iPark Museum of Art, Suwon, Korea; As the Moon Waxes and Wanes (2016), National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Gwacheon, Korea (MMCA); Lee Kun-Yong in Snail’s Gallop (2014), MMCA; Korean Historical Conceptual Art 1970–80s: Jack-of-all-trades (2010), Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, Ansan, Korea; Lee Kun-Yong: Logic, Life, Commonplace (1998), Fine Arts Center of The Korean Culture and Arts Foundation, Seoul, Korea; A Groping for the Identity of Korean Contemporary Art II: The Art in the ‘Reduction’ and ‘Expansion’ Period (1991), Hanwon Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Korean Contemporary Art: The Trend of the 1970s (1974), Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei, Taiwan; 8th Biennale de Paris (1973), Paris, France; and 15th Bienal de São Paulo (1979), São Paulo, Brazil.

His works are held in numerous public and private collections, including the Jeonbuk Museum of Art, Wanju, Korea; Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea; National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea; Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea, and The Rachofsky Collection, Dallas, USA.

 

Emily Parsons-Lord (b. 1984, Bathurst, NSW; lives and works Sydney) is a cross-disciplinary contemporary artist whose art and practice is informed by research and critical dialogue with materials and climate science, through investigation into air and light, both materially, and culturally. Parsons-Lord’s work interrogates notions of the ‘natural’, the universe, and considers deep history and speculative futures, with works that engaged with the materiality of invisibility, magic, and the stories we tell about reality.

Select exhibitions include: NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging), Artspace, Sydney (2017); There is nothing accidental or surprising about this, Vitalstatistix for Climate Century, Port Adelaide (2017-2018); The Future Leaks Out, Liveworks Festival, Carriageworks, Sydney (2017); Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2016); Trod by Beasts Alone, Wellington St Projects, Sydney (2017); Bristol Biennial: In Other Worlds, Bristol, UK (2016); Our Fetid Rank (Margaret Thatcher’s bottom lip and Bill Clinton’s tongue),  Firstdraft, Sydney (2015);  Ever Fresh, STILLS gallery, Sydney (2015); Underbelly Arts 2015, Cockatoo Island,  Sydney (2015); busied and bruised with looking, Perth Centre for Photography, Perth (2015).

Parsons-Lord has been a finalist in the NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging) in 2017 and the Fishers’ Ghost Award in 2016. Her work is held in the collection of Artbank, Australia.

Huseyin Sami (b. 1979, United Kingdom; lives and works Sydney) has been exhibiting since the late 1990s, with a multi-disciplinary practice that engages with painting, sculpture and installation. Sami’s work challenges and investigates the possibilities of paint itself – working with the colour, form and materiality of household acrylic paints but without any of the tools, gestures or decisions normally associated with the medium – letting paint drop and pool and paintings to ‘virtually make themselves’. Sami’s practice poses questions and develops new strategies for the production of paintings.

Selected exhibitions include Superposition of three types, Artspace, Sydney (2017); Shut up and Paint, National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), Melbourne (2016); Whispers from a Band of Myth Makers, Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney (2015); Assemblage II, 107 Redfern Projects, Sydney (2014); Never Underestimate a Monochrome, Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art, Rancho Cucamonga, USA (2013); 3, with Koji Ryui and Brandan Van Hek, Alaska Projects, Sydney (2013); Twenty/20, UTS Gallery, Sydney and Dubbo Regional Gallery, NSW (2010); Blue Blah! And other works, Kunst Projects, Berlin, Germany (2009); and Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2004). He was the winner of the 2005 Fauvette Louriero Memorial Artists Travel Scholarship.w

Sami’s work is held in many public collections, including that of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Artbank, Australia; Saatchi & Saatchi, New Zealand, as well as in private collections in Australia, Germany, Great Britain, Japan and the United States.

 

Daniel von Sturmer (b. Auckland, New Zealand, 1972; lives and works in Melbourne) is a leading video and multimedia artist whose works investigate and orchestrate the fields of relation between things, people, light, space, video and time. von Sturmer’s practice integrates video, photography and installation and often tests the ways in which the audience views artworks inside and outside the gallery.

In 2007, von Sturmer represented Australia at the 52nd Venice Biennale, showing in the Australian Pavilion. Recent exhibitions include: Electric Light (facts/figure), Bus Projects, Melbourne (2017); Under the Sun, State Library of New South Wales, Sydney and Monash Gallery of Art, Melbourne (2017); Red Green Blue: A History of Australian Video Art, Griffith University Art Gallery, Queensland College of Art, Brisbane (2017); Collective Visions: 130 Years, Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria (2017); Shut Up and Paint, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2016); The Kaleidoscopic Turn, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2015); 21st Century Heide: The Collection Since 2000, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria (2015); Camera Ready Actions, Young Projects Gallery, Los Angeles (2014); Daniel von Sturmer, Co­lumbus Museum of Art, Ohio (2013); Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2013); Time & Vision: New work from Australian artists, The Bargehouse, London (2012); Nego­tiating this world: Contemporary Australian Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2012); Set Piece, Site Gallery, Shef­field, United Kingdom (2009); The Object of Things, Australian Pavilion, Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2007).

von Sturmer’s work is held held in a number of significant collections, including that of the Gothenburg Museum of Art, Sweden; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand; Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne; Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria; Chartwell Collection, New Zealand; Dunedin Public Art Gallery, New Zealand; The Michael Buxton Contemporary Australian Art Collection, Melbourne; Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne; Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales; and Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane.

 

Exhibition Documentation

 

 

A silver-haired man with a splint bandaged along his torso and up his right arm leans over a table trying to grab some small biscuits laid out

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Eating Biscuit, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) biscuits, bandages and splints, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography.

 

A man in a denim shirt with glasses looks upwards as he points upwards with his right arm, which wrapped in bandages and aligned straight with a splint. Behind him are black and white printed photos of a man crouching in front of a crowd.

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Eating Biscuit, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) biscuits, bandages and splints, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography.

A white gallery space, with three white canvases hanging on the left wall, a black canvas hanging on the back wall, and a black landing on the floor with a long strip of white paper rolled out on top

Installation view (pre-performance): Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) acrylic on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Pre-performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

An East Asian male-presenting figure in glasses and a blue shirt paints blue circles on a white canvas. A crowd sitting and standing against a white wall look at him and take photos

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Back: Lee Kun-Yong performing The method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, acrylic paint on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea.

 

A male-presenting figure with silver hair, a blue striped shirt and white paints squats barefoot on a long scroll of white paper, drawing with a stick of charcoal

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, The Method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, re-performed in 2018. Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. These works have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

An East Asian male-presenting figure in a striped blue shirt and white pants squats on a long scroll of white paper, scribbling horizontally with a stick of charcoal. On either side of him is a crowd of onlookers, some of whom are holding up phone cameras

Front: Lee Kun-Yong performing Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Pre-performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Behind: Lee Kun-Yong, The Method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1976, re-performed in 2018. Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. All works courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. These works have been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

A silver-haired figure in a blue striped shirt and white paints stands with bent knees in front of a white wall while scribbling curved lines with a stick of charcoal in each hand

Lee Kun-Yong performing Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Performance view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. This artwork has been commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Art, Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

Three canvases painted with three different pastel colours, cut in circles and peeled back, hung on a white gallery wall

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Pictured: Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, performance, acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

A white gallery space with a long strip of white paper covered in charcoal marks, large canvases that have been cut or scribbled over, and curved black lines on the wall

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Terrorism is an enemy of Humankind (re-performed in 2017), white sheet, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Left to right: Huseyin Sami, Painting Cut Performance, 2018, Acrylic paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery. Lee Kun-Yong, Untitled, 2018. Charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-performed in 2018) acrylic on canvas, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

Blue and cream-coloured dripping lines painted on a white canvas, with light beams curving around one corner of a white gallery space. On the floor is a black landing with a strip of white paper covered in charcoal lines

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, first performed in 1979, (re-performed in 2018) paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Left to right: Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-3, first performed in 1976, (re-performed in 2018), Acrylic paint on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Daniel von Sturmer, Electric Light (facts/figures/4A), 2017, animated light installation, dimensions variableLee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-4, first performed in 1976 (re-performed in 2017), dimensions variable. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. Image: Document Photography.

 

Blue and grey paint on a white gallery wall drips downwards into a mass of grey paint strokes at the bottom of the wall

Installation view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Left to right: Lee Kun-Yong and Huseyin Sami, The method of Drawing 76-1-18 and Painting Performance (with feet), 2018. Acrylic paint on door, dimensions variable. Lee’s work courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Sami’s work courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery.

 

A white gallery space with a banner structure folded over three wooden poles. On the walls are black and white prints of an artist drawing on the ground with charcoal and scribbling on a wall in white

Installation detail view: Lee Kun-Yong: Equal Area, 2018, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. Front: Emily Parsons-Lord, a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable. Behind, left to right: Lee Kun-Yong, Snail’s Gallop, photographed in 1975 (reprinted in 2017), C-type print. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Lee Kun-Yong Logic of Place, first performed in 1975, (re-printed in 2017), C-type print, installation view at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-2, first performed in 1975, (re-printed in 2017) paint on canvas, dimensions variable. Lee Kun-Yong, The method of Drawing 76-4, first performed in 1976 (re-printed in 2017),paper, charcoal, dimensions variable. All commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, 2018. All courtesy the artist and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul, South Korea. Image: Document Photography Image: Document Photography.

 

A femme-presenting figure with short cropped hair and glasses sets fire to a wooden pole. Behind her are black and white prints of a man drawing a circle on the ground and scribbling on a wall.

Front: Emily Parsons-Lord, a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

A femme-presenting figure in a striped shirt and khaki green pants stands under a banner structure from which purple coloured smoke emanates

Front: Emily Parsons-Lord performing a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

Bright sparks explode in a dim room between four lines of burning rope, over a long scroll of white paper. Seated visitors look on from each side of the scroll

Front: Emily Parsons-Lord performing a raging event of continual noise (the Sun), 2018, performance, dimensions variable.

 

Club 4A

MELBOURNE 17 FEBRUARY & SYDNEY 23 FEBRUARY, 2018

Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan) headline Club 4A in Sydney and Melbourne this Lunar New Year.

 

In February, 4A takes performance art back to the club. 4A has been working with some of the most exciting and adventurous performance artists over recent years and in 2018 we leave the confines of the white cube and venture into the darkness of the club! For one night only, Club 4A in Sydney and Melbourne will present some of Australia’s leading performance artists as well as acclaimed international acts.

In Melbourne on Saturday 17 February as part of White Night, Club 4A takes over the Toff in Town with Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan), with additional artists: Makeda, Strict Face, Jalé , and Coris.

In Sydney on Friday 23 February, head down to Dynasty Karaoke to see with Rainbow Chan, Amrita Hepi and DEADKEBAB (Japan), supported by Slim Set, Tzekin (V Kim), and Jikuroux  and Coris (DJ).

Tickets for Club 4A Sydney have officially SOLD OUT.

SET TIMES

Doors: 7.00pm
Coris x Amrita Hepi: 7.00pm
Slim Set: 8.00pm
DEADKEBAB & PSYCHIC$: 9.00pm
Rainbow Chan: 10.00pm
Tzekin: 11.00pm
Jikuroux: 12.00am
DJ Plead: 1.00am
DJs b2b2b2…..: 2.00am – close

 

LISTEN // CLUB 4A Melbourne Mix // 17 Feb 2018

 

LISTEN // CLUB 4A Sydney  Mix // 23 Feb 2018

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium and Engagement – 21st Biennale of Sydney

SYDNEY. 16 MARCH – 11 JUNE 2018.

 

21st Biennale of Sydney

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement

16 March – 11 June, 2018

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and other venues

Artistic Director: Mami Kataoka

 

SUPERPOSITION: Equilibrium & Engagement will examine the theory of ‘superposition’ by investigating how it might operate in the world today. 70 leading international artists – chosen to offer a panoramic view of how opposing interpretations, can come together – will participate across seven venues. The exhibition at Artspace, Sydney will feature exceptional new projects by a diverse field of celebrated international artists.

 

Exhibiting artists at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art:

Akira Takayama: Born 1969 in Saitama, Japan. Lives and works in Tokyo, Japan; Yokohama, Japan; and Frankfurt, Germany
Jun Yang: Born 1975 in Qingtian, China. Lives and works in Vienna, Austria; Taipei, Taiwan; and Yokohama, Japan

 

Biennale of Sydney

2018 marks the 45th anniversary of the Biennale of Sydney and its twenty-first edition. The Biennale provides a platform for art and ideas and is recognised for commissioning and presenting innovative, thought-provoking art from Australia and around the globe. A leading international art event, The Biennale of Sydney has showcased the work of nearly 1,800 artists from more than 100 countries. It has attracted over 4 million visitors since its inception in 1973 and holds an important place on both the national and international stage.

The Biennale of Sydney is located on the traditional lands of the Gadigal people of the Eora nation. We acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Land and pay respect to Elders, both past and present.

 

Mami Katoka, Artistic Director

Internationally renowned curator Mami Kataoka is a key figure in analysing socio-historical and generational trends, particularly in the context of Japanese and Asian art, and frequently writes and lectures on contemporary art in Asia.

She has held the position of Chief Curator of the Mori Art Museum (MAM) in Tokyo since 2009, and Senior Curator since 2003. At MAM, Kataoka has curated numerous notable exhibitions including ‘Roppongi Crossing’ (survey show of contemporary Japanese art) (2004, 2013), ‘Sensing Nature: Perception of Nature in Japan’ (2010); as well as major survey shows of prominent artists in Asia such as Tsuyoshi Ozawa, Ai Weiwei, Lee Bul, Makoto Aida, Lee Mingwei and N.S. Harsha.

Exhibition Documentation
All images: Document Photography

A gallery space with blue wallpaper printed with vignettes of the Sydney city skyline, and a television screen mounted on the wall. The glass window is has a print of colourful irregular decal shapes stuck at the front. There is a round yellow table surrounded by five round yellow stools, and four rectangular stools arranged in front of the television screen

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

A round yellow dining table surrounded by round yellow stools in a gallery space decorated with blue wallpaper.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Four yellow rectangular stools arranged in a gallery space with blue wallpapered walls.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Close up of the blue wallpaper, painted with alternating views of the Sydney Opera House, Sydney Harbour Bridge and Centrepoint Tower

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

Close-ups of painted vignettes of Centrepoint Tower, Darling Harbour, Sydney's skyline and alternating views of the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Jun Yang, Xīní / Xuělí Blue Room, 2018 (detail), installation and printed wallpaper, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna; Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou; and ShugoArts, Tokyo.

A gallery space with two rows of white A4 paper fixed on two black gallery walls. They are spotlit by some gallery lights

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Two rows of white sheets of A4 paper printed with text, mounted on a black gallery wall

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Two rows of white sheets of A4 paper printed with text, mounted on a black gallery wall

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

A row of five red fabric chairs arranged in a dark room, in front of a screen with a video projection. On the left is a black gallery wall, on the right is a long red velvety curtain.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

A gallery space with black walls and a red velvety curtain. On furthermost wall is a video projection of a red floor. On the right of the gallery space is a series of white A4 sheets mounted on the wall under a gallery spotlight.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

A video still of a male-presenting figure of East Asian appearance standing at a stand-up microphone on a dark, empty stage. He wears glasses, a button up short-sleeved shirt and salmon pink shorts, with slipper-like shoes. His arms are resting by his sides.

Akira Takayama, Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project, 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins, installation view (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art for the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Courtesy the artist.

Justine Youssef: All Blessings, All Curses

SYDNEY. 2 NOVEMBER – 16 DECEMBER 2018.

All Blessings, All Curses presents recent and newly commissioned works by Sydney-based artist, Justine Youssef. Born in the heart of Western Sydney, Youssef’s practice negates the stifling white heat of global xenophobia with deeply personal and universal ruminations that layer the smell, sights and textures of her ancestral homeland, Lebanon.

The strength of Justine Youssef’s practice lies in the poetics of her storytelling and observations: a teacher blackens Arabic script, fearing that it contains a religious hate message; a smoke detector deafeningly sounds as a mother burns bakhoor to rid the house of the evil eye; the looks of confusion two girls receive as they scrub clean a Persian rug in their driveway. These scenes represent the lived experience of the artist who transforms everyday occurrences into visual metaphors.

Justine Youssef’s intuitive methodology draws upon this archive of personal memories as a departure point for All blessing, all curses. Employing sculpture, video, installation and text, Youssef examines the difficult experiences of misunderstanding with the grand subjects of faith, love, family and home. In doing so, she creates immersive experiences that are both epic and intimate – whispering invocations of promise, comfort and resistance.

Justine Youssef (b. 1992) is currently living on the unceded territory of the Darug peoples. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art from the National Art School, Sydney, Australia and is currently working from the Parramatta Artist Studios. She has been awarded the New South Wales Artists’ Grant (NAVA and Create NSW), as well as a studio residency at Blacktown Arts. She has held collaborative solo exhibitions at Seventh Gallery, Melbourne, and Firstdraft, Woolloomooloo with Duha Ali in 2018, and has participated in group exhibitions at Airspace Projects, Marrickville; Bankstown Art Center, Bankstown; Sullivan+Strumpf, Zetland; and Collab Gallery, Chippendale. Her work can be found in the collections of the National Association for the Visual Arts; the National Art School Drawing Archive; and the Sydney Gallery School.

Exhibition Documentation

All images: Kai Wasikowski

A glass facade in a red brick building, with the decal words 'Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses, 2 Nov - 16 Dec' stuck on the glass

Exterior view of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, In gallery interior: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, dimensions variable, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A tiny video screen in a white gallery wall, showing a spoon with burning incense

Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A mound of sandstone bricks on a hardwood floor

Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, dimensions variable, Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A mound of sandstone bricks on a hardwood floor

Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

An LED video screen stood up against a mound of sandstone bricks in a light-flooded gallery space

Left: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Right: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski.

An LED video screen showing hands waving a spoon over a pot, with the subtitles 'We need to sit down, and talk,'. The screen leans against a structure of sandstone bricks

Front: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

An LED video screen showing a tanned brown hand with a gold ring and an index finger stuck into a metal bowl with coriander. The subtitle reads, 'otherwise we'd be held up in Trablous.'

Front: Justine Youssef, All Blessings, All Curses (Blood on the earth), 2018, sandstone and taxidermied scorpion, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. This commission has been made possible by the generous support of the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art Set group.  Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist, 2017, single channel video, 25 second, installation view, 4A Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Three photographic prints showing a few femme-presenting figures dressed in muted colours with their hair tied back with bandanas, kneeling on and scrubbing a teal green Persian rug

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Two teal green Persian rugs laid on a hardwood floor with two LED video screens stood on top, showing the same displayed rugs in other settings

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Two LED video screens on a teal green Persian rug. The screens show a series of Persian rugs laid out in other concreted spaces

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.
Two green-toned Persian rugs in a light-flooded gallery space, with two LED screens stood on top showing a woman legs-down cleaning a floor
Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A teal green Persian rug with an LED screen on top showing a series of folded Persian rugs in a tiled floor in a concrete building

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A naturally lit window sill with three groups of plates stacked in the sun

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Close-up of black glazed clay bowls and brass bowls

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A wall constructed from sandstone brick with a LED video screen showing a close-up of one half of a face with black kohl painted over a closed eyelid

Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

A wall constructed from sandstone brick with a LED video screen showing two tanned hands tipping a clay bowl over onto the ground

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

An LED video screen showing three brass bowls and a yellow tin can on a natural red rock shelf

Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. 

Two LED video screens showing a femme-presenting woman with long brown hair in a desert landscape leaning over a set of brass bowls and a yellow tin can

Front left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

Two LED video screens against a small sandstone brick wall, showing a video of granite rocks in brown water

Front left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back right: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image Kai Wasikowski.

A small brick sandstone wall, several LED TV screens and two teal green Persian rugs arranged in a white gallery space

Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A TV screen showing hands moving over a platter with brass bowls

Front right: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Close-up of two adjoining knee-height walls built from sandstone brick, with two screens resting against their interior. Behind these walls are two deep green Persian rugs with LCD screens set up on top.

Front: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Eight glass bottles filled with different coloured liquids, arranged on a hardwood gallery floor

Centre Front: Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Middle Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminium pot on a pavers floor, next to two glass bottles filled with brownish liquids. On the white wall behind are two photographs.

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A photograph of a female-presenting figure in a long white dress, seated with her hands working over an aluminium pot against an industrial factory backdrop. She appears to work near a production line and various stacks of cardboard boxes, while plant cuttings surround her on a wet floor.

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Light coming through a gallery window onto eight glass bottles filled with different liquids, arranged next to an aluminium pot, a two ring gas burner and a gas cylinder on a pavers floor.

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Light coming through a gallery window onto eight glass bottles filled with different liquids, arranged next to an aluminium pot, a two ring gas burner and a gas cylinder on a pavers floor. A photograph is mounted on the white wall behind this installation

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

Light coming through a gallery window onto eight glass bottles filled with different liquids, arranged next to an aluminium pot, a two ring gas burner and a gas cylinder on a pavers floor

Justine Youssef, An Other’s Wurud, 2017-ongoing, Installation incorporating photographic documentation, video and mixed media including David Austine and Burnet roses, water, two ring gas burner, gas cylinder, aluminum pot, sleve, pavers and glass bottles, dimensions variable, installation view: detail, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artist. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A photograph of a snake on white fabric, with its head near a gold necklace with a small evil eye amulet. Underneath this photo is a print of a female-presenting figure in a long red and black striped dress with extremely long black sleeves that seem a few metres long. She stands in the desert with her left arm extended above her head and her right arm extended outwards, so the sleeves blow outwards with the wind.

Front: Justine Youssef and Leila El Rayes, Burying that which binds into the chest of my beloved, 2018, photographic documentation (of single channel video, 6 minutes), 2 photographs, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Youssef and Duha Ali, Kohl, 2018, Three channel video installation, 4 minutes, and 3 brass bowls, kohl, sandstone and clay, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. This work was produced with the support of the NAVA NSW Artist’s Grant 2017. Image: Kai Wasikowski.

A photograph of a snake on white fabric, with its head near a gold necklace with a small evil eye amulet. Underneath this photo is a print of a female-presenting figure in a long red and black striped dress with extremely long black sleeves that seem a few metres long. She stands in the desert with her left arm extended above her head and her right arm extended outwards, so the sleeves blow outwards with the wind. Both photographs are mounted on a wall in front of a bigger gallery space with three green Persian rugs arranged on the floor with two LCD screens mounted on top.

Front: Justine Youssef and Leila El Rayes, Burying that which binds into the chest of my beloved, 2018, photographic documentation (of single channel video, 6 minutes), 2 photographs, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski. Back left: Justine Youssef and Duha Ali, Body/Cartography, 2018, 3 channel video, 4 minutes, two rugs, 280 x 190cm and 230 x 315cm, and photographic documentation, dimensions variable, installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy of the artists. Image: Kai Wasikowski.