LIYEN CHONG: THREADED STORIES Workshop

20 and 21 November 2010

We’ve invited Liyen Chong to develop one of 4A’s Community Mapping Projects in 2010. Liyen is known for her exquisite embroidered artworks using human hair and her use of images which form a potent symbolic language reflective of cultural history, memory and social roles of women.

Together with the Chinese Heritage Association and the Chinese Women’s Association, we are inviting the community to join the artist to embark on a project that will see the development of a new embroidered artwork -created by the community, using their own hair.

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SUMUGAN SIVANESAN: WHAT’S EATING GILBERTO GIL?

14 May 2010, Momentum Sydney, 231 Wilson Street, Eveleigh

Lecture and performance by Sumugan Sivanesan

“Only Cannibalism unites us. Socially. Economically. Philosophically.” *

Our civilised societies have a long held fascination with the primitive. The Europeans devised the colonial ‘Other’, the Moderns espoused the perfection of ‘Natural Man’, and now we have the anthropological fantasy of the ‘Last Cannibal Tribe’.

Recent developments in gene technology have revealed that all present day human cultures, at some stage, consumed the flesh of their own.

What’s Eating Gilberto Gil? explores the history of the cannibal trope, its impressions here and its potential ‘fabulation’ across the shifting dynamics of contemporary global life — invariably edging towards transgression, transformation, and ultimately consumption of a manifest tabu.

Sumugan Sivanesan’s What’s Eating Gilberto Gil?, is part of 4A’s major curated project Last Words that will unfold over the 2010 calendar. Comprising performance, workshops, lectures, solo and group exhibitions. Last Words explores language, knowledge and communication in an age of cultural diversity and globalisation, particularly focused on Asian artists living here in Australia and overseas.

Momentum Sydney, 231 Wilson Street, Eveleigh (adjacent to Carriageworks)

*Oswald de Andrade, Manifesto Antropófago. In Piratininga 374th year of the deglutition of Bishop Sardinha.

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Lecture
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TATSUMI ORIMOTO: OIL CAN PERFORMANCE

13 May 2010, 12:30pm at Gallery 4A

4A is pleased to present OIL CAN, a performance by Tatsumi Orimoto.

Employing humour, often to the discomfort of the viewer, Tatsumi Orimoto’s artistic practice examines communication. Through the duration of this performance, the absurd gives way to a tender and serious existential questioning.


Tatsumi Orimoto (Kawasaki, 1946) studied at the Institute of Art, California. In 1971 he moved to New York, where he worked as an assistant to Nam June Paik and was introduced to Fluxus. In 1977 he returned to Kawasaki where he currently lives and works. His performances have been presented in several countries including the Biennale of Sydney, Sāo Paulo Biennale and Venice Biennale.

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Performance at Gallery 4A ground level

CINEMA ALLEY 2010

19 February 2010

For one night only, Parker Street, Haymarket is transformed into a street cinema screening animation from the 1960s by the Shanghai Animation Company and contemporary video art by one of China’s leading video artists — Yang Fudong.

This double billing showcases Yang’s celebrated, poetic film originally shot on 35mm, Estranged Paradise,as well as The Cowboy’s Flute, a short animation work from the Shanghai Animation Studio, one of the key animation studios established during the 1950s in China.

Yang Fudong is internationally renowned for his poetically challenging photography and film work, which lyrically captures modern life. Moments of intimacy: moods, dreams, feelings and aspirations embody experiences of alienation in urban life.

An Estranged Paradise, his first major film work, follows the character of Zhuzi, a young intellectual swept up in melancholy and the beauty of the world, who eventually finds contentment in life’s simple pleasures. Set in the beautiful southern city of Hangzhou, nicknamed ‘paradise’, Zhuzi’s restlessness is mimicked by Hangzhou’s relentless rain and languor. Blurring China’s traditional and contemporary cultures and landscapes, the film’s sense of timelessness is at odds with the bustling modernity that Zhuzi is deeply embroiled in.

The Cowboy’s Flute is an animation classic directed by Te Wei (b 1915) and produced by the Shanghai Animation Studio. The studio is renowned for its beautiful animation style incorporating ink and wash painting, ‘New Year’ style woodcuts, paper cutting and puppetry. The Cowboy’s Flute is about a young cowherd, with extraordinary flute playing abilities, and his faithful water buffalo. This film has no dialogue. Its narrative unfolds through the masterfully animated brush and ink painting and a whimsical musical soundtrack.

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SHIGEYUKI KIHARA TALANOA: WALK THE TALK #V PERFORMANCE

14 January 2010

Kihara’s practice often develops platforms for inter-cultural discussion, by bringing together two musical or dance groups from different cultural backgrounds to develop performances in public spaces.

SHIGEYUKI KIHARA
TALANOA: WALK THE TALK #V PERFORMANCE
14 JANUARY, DIXON STREET MALL, CHINATOWN

Shigeyuki Kihara is a Japanese/Samoan artist based in New Zealand. Kihara recently embarked on an ambitious set of performances based on a Samoan concept of Talanoa which roughly translates as “to chat or converse” and is also a practice of talking through matters of cultural and social importance. Kihara’s Talanoa series develops a platform for inter-cultural discussion, by bringing together two musical or dance groups from different cultural backgrounds. For Edge of Elsewhere, Kihara was commissioned by 4A to develop her fifth Talanoa: Walk the Talk performance on Dixon St, Chinatown working with local Chinese and Pacific Island communities.

Photo credit:
Talanoa: Walk the Talk #V, Sydney Cook Island Dance Group and the Australian Yau Kung Mun Association. Courtesy the artist. Commissioned by 4A