SEA PEARL WHITE CLOUD 海珠白雲

SYDNEY. 30 JULY – 24 SEPTEMBER 2016.

Sea Pearl White Cloud is a project realised through a collaboration between 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, located in the heart of Sydney’s Chinatown, and Guanzghou’s Observation Society, one of China’s most exciting contemporary art project spaces. Bringing together Sydney-based artist Lucas Ihlein and Guangdong-born, Hong Kong-based artist Trevor Yeung, Sea Pearl White Cloud presents new works informed by questions of temporality, exchange and poetics that reflect on the urban condition in the twenty-first century.

This exhibition, presented at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art from 30 July – 24 September 2016, is the second iteration of a two-stage project that saw an exhibition of works by Ihlein and Yeung presented at Observation Society in Guangzhou from 2 June – 24 July 2016. Sea Pearl White Cloud at 4A will unveil the works produced by the artists in Guangzhou alongside new works produced in Sydney that extend the themes and ideas underpinning the artists’ practice and collaboration.

Following fieldwork within the distinctive spatial and social setting of the residential community in which Observation Society is situated in Guangzhou’s district of Haizhu, as well as further afield throughout the Pearl River Delta, this project has arisen from conversations and research undertaken by the artists over nine months. Ihlein and Yeung’s conceptual approaches are informed by quasi-scientific methodologies of tracking and testing various dynamic systems of movement and stasis, control and disorder. Their aims as artists have little to do with producing knowledge in the traditional sense, but rather serve to propose poetic visual and gestural allegories that seek to illuminate everyday occurrences of material and spiritual transformations.

Trevor Yeung’s works are particularly concerned with manipulations of nature – as in his use of UV lighting, dehumidifying units and aquariums – to poetically propose connections between nature, the material world and their emotional import. Complementing this, Lucas Ihlein has extended his ongoing interest in Sydney’s more hidden and neglected natural waterways to that of Guanzghou. Ihlein’s series of screen prints expose a topography of the precarious projections of sea level rise as it might affect Haizhu and the broader Pearl River Delta as the most densely urbanised landscape in the world. This artistic collaboration across themes and context is signaled by the project’s title: Haizhu (海珠) or ‘Sea Pearl,’ signaling a process of materiality – and even beauty – being forged through time; and Baiyun (白雲) or ‘White Cloud’, suggestive of interminable transience, while in a more practical sense being the name of the district in which Guangzhou’s international airport is located and where Trevor Yeung originally sourced live fish and water for his work.

This project is supported by the City of Sydney with Observation Society’s exhibition opening in June being part of the official program of the City of Sydney and Guangzhou Municipality’s civic celebrations marking the 30th anniversary of their sister-city relationship. Having artistic collaboration at its heart – between individuals, organisations and cities – this exhibition builds on the links between cities while forging new modes of dialogue that reflect on our shared local, regional and global experiences.

Complementing the two-stage exhibition project 4A, with the support of the City of Sydney and Art Monthly Australasia, appointed Minerva Inwald as the recipient of the inaugural 4A Emerging Writer’s Project. Selected by a panel comprising Michael Fitzgerald, Editor, Art Monthly Australasia; Luise Guest, Director of Education & Research, White Rabbit Collection; and Pedro de Almeida, 4A Program Manager and Editor of The 4A Papers, Minerva is an integral part of the project team, having undertaken her own fieldwork as Observation Society’s exhibition unfolded in June, and more recently extended to Sydney. Her research will see texts published The 4A Papers and other titles, documenting the development, realisation and reception of the exhibitions along with interviews with the artists.

 

Public Program:

Talking about rice while eating rice

Thursday 11 August

6.00PM – 7.30PM

Free – Book Your Seat.

Join us for an evening with this most ubiquitous of grains.

Building on his recent visit to a rice farming enterprise in Guangdong province, Lucas Ihlein hosts a conversation with artist Vic McEwan, recipient of the Arts NSW Regional Fellowship 2014-15 (NarranderaNSW), and rice farmer Tim Randall (Griffith NSW). Discussion will focus on asking what social, environmental and economic factors affect rice farming communities in Australia and China today?

Several varieties of Randall Organic Rice will be sampled on the night!

This 4A Centre for Contemporay Asian Art public program is a co-production with the Kandos School of Cultural Adaptation (KSCA) and the Material Ecologies Research Network (MECO) at University of Wollongong.

 

 

 

Artists:

Lucas Ihlein (b. 1975, Sydney, Australia) is a Wollongong-based artist whose current work explores the relationship between socially engaged art, agriculture and ecological management. He is a founding member of artists’ collectives SquatSpace, Big Fag Press, and Teaching and Learning Cinema.Exhibitions include The Yeomans Project (with Ian Milliss), Art Gallery of New South Wales (2013-14); Green Bans Art Walk, The Cross Arts Projects & Big Fag Press, Sydney (2011); In the Balance: Art for a Changing World, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2010); There Goes the Neighbourhood, Performance Space, Sydney (2009); The Bon Scott Project, Fremantle Arts Centre, Perth (2008); and Bilateral, Australian Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide (2002). He completed a PhD at Deakin University, Melbourne, in 2008 entitled Framing Everyday Experience: Blogging as Art, which won the Alfred Deakin Medal for best Doctoral Thesis in Humanities and Social Sciences. A recipient of numerous awards and artist residencies, in 2015 Ihlein was awarded a prestigious Australia Council for the Arts Fellowship for Emerging and Experimental Arts. He is currently an ARC DECRA Research Fellow at University of Wollongong, Australia.

http://guangzhou-delta-haiku.net

Trevor Yeung (b. 1988, Guangdong Province, China) lives and works in Hong Kong. He graduated from the Academy of Visual Arts at Hong Kong Baptist University in 2010. Yeung’s practice uses botanic ecology, horticulture, photography and installations as metaphors that reference the emancipation of everyday aspirations toward human relationships. Solo exhibitions include No Pressure, Zürcher Hochschule der Künste, Zürich (2015); Garden Cruising: It’s Not That Easy Being Green, Blindspot Gallery, Art Basel Hong Kong (2015); That Dog at the Party, Gallery EXIT, Hong Kong (2014); and Trevor Yeung’s Encyclopedia, Observation Society, Guangzhou (2013). Group exhibitions include Adrift, OCT Contemporary Art Terminal, Shenzhen (2016); Peep Show, Long March Space, Beijing (2015); A Hundred Years of Sham – Songs of Resistance and Scenarios for Chinese Nations, Para Site, Hong Kong (2015); and Social Factory, 10th Shanghai Biennale, Power Station of Art, Shanghai (2014).

Writer:

Minerva Inwald is a current PhD candidate in the Department of History, University of Sydney, whose research focuses on the history of the National Art Museum of China (NAMOC) between 1958 and 1989. Using Chinese-language primary sources to examine how exhibitions as this prestigious space were used to communicate ideas about the role of art in China in relation to conceptions of ‘the people,’ her research seeks to investigate broader questions of how art objects circulate in museum contexts, as well as outside museums such as in domestic, work and public spheres. Minerva graduated with Bachelor of Arts (Languages) Honours degree from the University of Sydney in 2012, and in the same year was awarded the Francis Stuart Prize for Asian Art History form the Department of Art History. She has contributed a number of papers at academic conferences in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, and recently undertook an 8-month postgraduate exchange program at Beijing’s Central Academy of Fine Arts.

 

Exhibition documentation
All images: Document Photography

4a_august_dp_72dpi-2Lucas Ihlein and Trevor Yeung, 海珠白雲 Sea Pearl White Cloud (2016), exhibition view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Observation Society and supported by the City of Sydney. Image: Document Photography.
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Lucas Ihlein, 廣州三角洲 俳句(珠江三角洲洪水地圖 ) Guangzhou Delta Hiaku (Pearl River Delta Flood Maps) (detail) (2016), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Observation Society and supported by the City of Sydney. Image: Document Photography.
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Lucas Ihlein and Trevor Yeung, 海珠白雲 Sea Pearl White Cloud (2016), exhibition view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Observation Society and supported by the City of Sydney. Image: Document Photography.
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Trevor Yeung, 馬纓丹切花 Fresh Cut Lantana (2016), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art/ Courtesy the artist. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Observation Society and supported by the City of Sydney. Image: Document Photography.
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Trevor Yeung, 海珠白雲 Sea Pearl White Cloud (2016), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Observation Society and supported by the City of Sydney. Image: Document Photography.
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Lucas Ihlein, 吃飯時說 Talking About Rice While Eating Rice (detail) (2016), installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Observation Society and supported by the City of Sydney. Image: Document Photography.
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Lucas Ihlein, 海珠白雲 Sea Pearl White Cloud (2016), exhibition view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Observation Society and supported by the City of Sydney. Image: Document Photography.
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Lucas Ihlein and Trevor Yeung, 海珠白雲 Sea Pearl White Cloud (2016), exhibition view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in partnership with Observation Society and supported by the City of Sydney. Image: Document Photography.

 

Jogja Calling

SYDNEY. 22 OCTOBER – 17 DECEMBER 2016.

Jogja Calling examines the long-standing links between the artistic communities of Australia and Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Over the past few decades Yogyakarta has become a leading destination for Australian artists looking to expand their practice and undertake residencies in Indonesia’s leading contemporary art city. Abdul Abdullah, Briony Galligan and Reko Rennie have all completed residencies in the last ten years where they have developed networks, collaborative partners and friendships. For these artists’ their approach to art making has been markedly influenced by their time in Jogja and, in particular, by the work of Leonardiansyah Allenda, Arwin Hidayat and Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan. These artists’ provided entrée into the tight-knit local art community enabling them to meet artists and artisans, participate in late-night artistic debates and venture on back-seat moto rides where long-term working relationships and friendships were formed. Jogja Calling brings these six artists together framing their works as extensions of their friendships.

Jogja Calling places the work of these artists in conversation where their somewhat disparate practices are encouraged to converge. Within this framework Rennie and Hahan’s playful but critical examinations of Australian and Indonesian culture reveal landscape to still be a defining influence. While not natural companion pieces the kinetic sculptures of both Allenda and Galligan appear as echoes of each other inviting viewers to consider the precarious balance and imbalance of relationships. The final duo of Abdullah and Hidayat reveal a return to collaborative work with artisans – where traditional techniques of embroidery and batik can support critical contemporary commentary.

 

Biographies:

Abdul Abdullah (b. 1986 Perth, Australia) is an artist from Perth, currently based in Sydney who works across painting, photography, video, installation and performance. As a self-described ‘outsider amongst outsiders’, his practice is primarily concerned with the experience of the ‘other’ in society. Abdullah’s projects have engaged with different marginalized minority groups and he is particularly interested in the experience of young Muslims in the contemporary multicultural Australian context. Since 2009 Abdul received numerous awards across Australia. He has been selected as a finalist in the 2016 Basil Sellers Prize and the 2016 Sulman Prize. He was an Archibald Prize finalist in 20162014, 2013 and 2011, and has been a finalist for the Western Australian of the Year Youth Award, the Blake Prize and a Sovereign Art Prize amongst many others. Abdullah has works in the collections of National Gallery of Australia, The Art Gallery of Western Australia, The Gallery of Modern Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Artbank, Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, Murdoch University, Islamic Museum of Australia, Bendigo Art Gallery, Campbelltown Art Centre and the Town of Victoria Park. Recent exhibitions include HERE&NOW16/GenYM at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery and Coming to Terms at Mossgreen Sydney, Painting, more painting at ACCA, and Public Body 1.0 at Artspace. Abdul completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Curtin University of Technology and is currently completing a Masters entitled Terms of engagement: examining the rhetoric of radicalisation at UNSW Art and Design.

Leonardiansyah “Leo” Allenda (b. 1984 Banyuwangi, Indonesia) is an artist whose research spectrum focuses on the identification of material’s value in relation to space. His installation Private Number explores the complex exchange of cultural values through hybrid aesthetics that questions traditions and the collective and personal myths that evolve with society-binding values. Solo exhibitions of his work were presented at Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia (2014); Inkubator Asia, Jakarta, Indonesia (2012). He has participated in some group exhibitions including Jakarta Biennale (2015), Jakarta, Indonesia; Fukutake House Project, Sodoshima, Japan; Biennale Jogja XII, the Equator (2013), Yogyakarta, Indonesia; National Ceramic Museum of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. He also participated a number of residency programs including HotWave #3, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; Britto International Residency, Dhaka, Bangladesh. He is currently a resident artist at Rijksakademie, Amsterdam.

Briony Galligan (b. 1983 Hobart, Australia) is a Melbourne-based artist working with textiles, installation, video and performance work. Galligan explores points where personal, social and art histories collide. Her work is concerned with how the construction of the past, in archives, buildings and gestures, is continually remoulded and revolving through collective and individual bodies. Briony has presented new installation and performance works at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne in Dancing Umbrellas (2016), She imagines a city and with artist-run space, Comfort Station in Chicago, USA. Recent exhibitions include Nothing incarnadine, St Heliers Gallery, Abbotsford Convent, No I couldn’t agree with you more TCB Art Inc., Body language does not have a grammar, The Substation and Movement behind the Backdrop with Rafaella McDonald in The Kaleidoscopic Turn at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2015. Briony completed a BFA (Hons) at Monash University 2014, at the Institut Seni Indonesia, Yogyakarta (2012) and at Rhode Island School of Design (2014). In 2015, she completed residencies at Chicago-based ACRE and Ox-Bow, associated with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Arwin Hidayat (b.1983, Yogyakarta) creates small works on paper, mostly black and white, sometimes stained with grey washes. Their graphic, 2D nature recalls both batik patterning and comics that refer to symbols that incorporate the ordinary with the explicit. Hidayat is an alumnus of the ISI Yogyakarta, Faculty of Fine Art. Since 2000 he has exhibited in exhibitions such as Kobe, Japan in 2006, Neo Folk in IKKAN Gallery in Singapore, Asia Print (Crack Project) in Sydney, Australia and Artjog14 Legacy of Power in 2014. Hidayat also held his first solo exhibition Flash Show Drawing in West Brunswick, Melbourne, Australia in 2012 and Solo Exhibition Bau Powder Blues at Via Via Cafe Yogyakarta in 2013. He recently won the Red Base Young Artist Award from Jogja Gallery, Yogyakarta and exhibited as part of MASKS, at Diesel Art Gallery, Shibuya, Tokyo.

Reko Rennie (b. 1974 Melbourne, Australia) is an interdisciplinary artist who explores his Aboriginal identity through contemporary media. Through his art, Rennie provokes discussion surrounding Indigenous culture and identity in contemporary urban environments. Largely autobiographical, his commanding works combine the iconography of his Kamilaroi heritage with stylistic elements of graffiti. Merging traditional diamond-shaped designs, hand-drawn symbols and repetitive patterning to subvert romantic ideologies of Aboriginal identity. He has shown internationally including Paris, Berlin, Italy, Jakarta, Shanghai and USA. Recent highlights include solo shows Visible Invisible at Blackartprojects, Melbourne 2016, I Was Always Here Blackartprojects at Sydney Contemporary 2015 and group shows ‘Painting. More Painting’, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne 2016, Venice Biennale 2015 and No sleep till Dreamtime at the Art Gallery of NSW, 2014. He won the National Indigenous Art Awards in 2015 and was a resident at Cemeti Art House in Yogyakarta in 2014. He lives and works in Melbourne.

Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan (b. 1983 Kebumen, Indonesia) creates works characterised by an ongoing tussle between ‘high art’ and ‘low art’, blurring realism with decoration. His works illustrates a point of contact that exists between urbanization and agrarianism, the East and the West or between the local and the global. Hahan incorporates film, music and street culture into a distinct visual language, creating a sense of movement and spontaneity in what can be described as a topsy-turvy reality steeped in satirical humor. Since 2003, he has participated in numerous group exhibitions in Indonesia and abroad. His works have been collected by several art museum including Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) Brisbane, Australia and National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Melbourne, Australia. He also one of the founders of Ace House Collective, a young artists’ collective and initiative space based in Yogyakarta which trying to capture the culture of Indonesian contemporary society through multidiscipline work process, collaboration, and research.  In recent years, he attempts to display an art with the concept that emphasizes on the interaction with the visitors and relate it with the development of art in global as well as its society. By showing metaphorical atmosphere yet full of satirical humor. The mapping of production/consumption matter of cutting-edge art market and its gleaming, and also the ironies which are then packed with alluring spirit of artistic exploration.

Exhibition documentation
All images: Document Photography

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Leonardiansyah Allenda, Private Numbers (2016), installation, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.
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Leonardiansyah AllendaPrivate Numbers (2016), installation detail, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.
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Jogja Calling (2016), ground floor gallery view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Art. Image: Document Photography.
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Jogja Calling (2016), exterior view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Art. Image: Document Photography.
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Left to right: Abdul AbdullahBe happy (2016) and Don’t worry (2016), embroidery, 150 x 120 cm. Courtesy the artist and Fehily Contemporary. Made with the assistance of DGTMB Art Embroidery. Image: Document Photography.
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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka HahanWelkome Mate (2012), photographs, blanket, one-channel video, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.
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Jogja Calling (2016), first floor exhibition view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Art. Clockwise from right: Arwin HidayatRoh Roh Dalam Senjata (The Spirits Inside The Weapon), 2016; Reko RennieWarriors Come Out to Play, 2014; Uji Handoko Eko Saputro aka Hahan, Welkome Mate, 2012; Reko RennieCrest, 2014; Abdul Abdullah,Be happy, 2016; Abdul AbdullahDon’t worry, 2016. Installation view. Courtesy the artists and Fehily Contemporary. Image: Document Photography.
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Arwin HidayatRoh Roh Dalam Senjata (The Spirits Inside The Weapon) (2016), detail; cotton fabric, 200 x 110 cm. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.
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Briony GalliganDoor-to-door (2015), installation detail. Teak hands made by Yogyakarta wood carver Pak Lejar based on sketches completed with Galligan of Queen Elizabeth’s hands, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist. Image: Document Photography.

PIO ABAD: 1975 – 2015

SYDNEY. 14 MAY – 9 JULY 2016.

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art presents the first Australian exhibition of London-based Filipino artist Pio Abad, 1975 – 2015. While much of Pio Abad’s work is concerned with the so-called ‘conjugal dictatorship’ of former Filipino President Ferdinand Marcos and his wife Imelda Marcos (1965-86), this exhibition expands this historical concern. For 4A Abad has established a historical framework, which begins in 1975 with the evacuation of United States forces from Saigon, Vietnam, and concludes in 2015 with a body of work that attempts to recalibrate the archiving of several conflicts spanning post-Marcos Philippines to the Balkans conflict of the 1990s.

Pio Abad employs strategies of appropriation and replication to reveal the social and political impact of specific objects usually consigned to the sidelines of history. Underpinning Abad’s telescopic practice is an ongoing interest in the social and political narratives that domestic objects play in our lives. Using inexpensive reproduction techniques that contrast with the opulent objects he replicates, the works presented in 1975 – 2015 draw connections between these otherwise disparate historical narratives.

A key work in this exhibition, 105 Degrees and Rising (2015) takes its title from the secret radio code used by the United States Army to signal the evacuation of Saigon. In this custom designed wallpaper, Pio Abad conscripts two found visual sources: the ERDL camouflage developed by the US military for the jungles of Vietnam, and the well-known 1976 pinup photograph of American actress Farah Fawcett. While the original radio call signalled America’s final dramatic retreat from its ignominious war in Indochina, Abad’s wallpaper proffers an alternative history of authoritarian rule, which is at once aggressive and seductive. As an aggregation and overlay of cultural artefacts, 105 Degrees and Rising suggests a complex reading of history which acknowledges the sustained colonial influence of the United States across Southeast Asia.

Pio Abad choreographs familiar objects and narratives, animating them to initiate a critical conversation on the discourses of singularity, surplus and semblance. He looks at his source material as traces of something sordid, a body of evidence that exhibits morbid symptoms of a possible psychopathology of power. By presenting these discrete bodies of work, Abad attempts to unpack his own interest in the artifice and its claims to originality, whether it is art that is not replicable, or national leader who found their own narratives of fabulation.1

1. Patrick Flores, The Collection of Jane Ryan & William Saunders, Jorge B. Vargas Museum, exhibition notes, 2014.

 

FUTURE ARCHAEOLOGY at NEXUS ARTS, ADELAIDE

ADELAIDE. 19 MAY – 22 JULY 2016.

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art’s first exhibition in Adelaide is a touring presentation of Future Archaeology hosted by our collaborative parter Nexus Arts.

Future Archaeology presents work by a group of emerging and mid-career artists who conceptually engage with notions of tradition through contemporary cultural artefacts. Through an appropriation of the discipline of archaeology, the exhibition attempts to present a complex image of the social and political movements throughout the Asia-Pacific based on narratives of migration, cultural displacement and appropriation.

Future Archaeology draws on a leading theme of multiplicity – of numerous geo-historical trajectories borne of moments of disruption, rather than continuity – as a means to consider both historical moments and contemporary developments that have shaped the cultural landscape. Attempting to draw connections between cultural traditions and contemporary experiences are works that explore, for example, the mass migration of Vietnamese to Australia, the widespread deforestation and cultural destruction of Central America, and the confluence of Western and Pakistani ideals of masculinity.

The exhibition features new works that have been commissioned by 4A complemented by existing works presented in Australia for the first time. With art forms spanning sawdust carpets through to truck art medallions, Future Archaeology reflects upon experiences of cultural dislocation and the attempts made by artists to initiate new conversations across geographical and historical distances, which together offer alternatives on aesthetic and conceptual development of contemporary Australian art.

Nexus Arts,
Lion Arts Centre; Corner North Terrace & Morphett St
Adelaide 5000       

Produced & Presented by

Nathan Beard is an interdisciplinary artist based in Western Australia whose work engages syncretistically with the myriad of influences from his Thai-Australian background. He critically deconstructs tense binary divisions between the East and West, the highbrow and low culture, and the conceptual centre and periphery relationship and explores these cultural exchanges through his playful artistic practice. Beard had participated in solo and group exhibitions including Ad Matres, Artereal Gallery, Sydney (2015); Light Locker Art Space, Perth CBD, Perth (2013); Interregna, Moana Peroject Space, Perth (2013); and the 2012 Next Wave Festival – the space between us wants to sing, NGV Studio, Melbourne (2012). He has held residencies in Speedy Grandma, Bangkok and the Perth Institude of Contemporary Arts, Perth and is part of The Greater Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere with fellow artists Abdul Abdullah and Casey Ayers.

Léuli Eshraghi is a Melbourne-based artist who uses illustration, painting, photography and installation to discuss indigeneity, language, body sovereignty and queer possibility. His works on paper retrace and reconnect to his Persian and Samoan heritages, taking inspiration from the traditional aesthetics of gabbeh carpet and siapo barkcloth in order to visualise hidden stories, concealed traumas and spirits of the past. Eshraghi is the current Gertrude Contemporary-Next Wave Emerging Curator and editor of the Contemporary Pacific Arts Festival’s Oceania Now publication. He has exhibited at Seventh Gallery, Melbourne (2015); the Contemporary Pacific Arts Festival (2015); and RM Gallery, Auckland (2014). Eshraghi’s curatorial projects include Total Eclipse, Melbourne Fringe Festival, The Ownership Project (2014); and the award winning So Fukin Native with Pauline Vetuna mentor Taloi Havini, Melbourne Fringe Festival, Blak Dot Gallery (2012).

Deanna Hitti is an artist specializing in printmaking, drawing from her professional experience of over 14 years in the field. Her books and prints, published through her own studio, investigate the complex relationship between Eastern and Western cultures and how this relationship is understood and constructed through the perspective of a Lebanese-Australian. Hitti’s arist books reflect on classicism in both hemispheres of the world, analysing the notions of exoticism, romanticism and the orientalist gaze to comprehend contemporary representations of the Middle East in both art and the media. She has exhibited internationally in solo and group shows including The Centre for Book Arts (New York); IMPACT8 Conference, Scotland; Langford120, Melbourne; and 45 Downstairs, Melbourne. The artist’s books and prints have been bought by The State Library of Victoria and the National Library of Australia, among other major Australian collections. 

Andy Mullens is a Canberra-based artist whose practice discusses concepts of singular and group identity, and self-representation through an exploration of cultural identity, family history and national history. Working between both film and digital photography as well as sculpture and traditional craft, she strives to reconcile her Australian and Vietnamese identity, realigning herself with her Vietnamese family, cultural heritage and her history. After completing a Bachelor of Visual Arts (Honours) in 2014, Mullens exhibited her first solo show three at Canberra Contemporary Art Space, Canberra in 2015. She has also participated in group exhibitions including Past Perfect, Leta Gallery + Project Space, Canberra (2015); and Plucked, gallery@bcs, Canberra (2015), part of the ANU School of Art Emerging Artist Support Scheme BSC Springboard Award.

Claudia Nicholson was born in Bogota, Colombia 1987. In 2011 she graduated with a Bachelor Of Fine Arts (Honours) from UNSW Art and Design (Formally COFA). In 2013 She exhibited at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art as part of their emerging artist program. In 2013 she participated in Centro Selva’s artist in residency program in the Peruvian Amazon and had her first solo show, Silly Homeland, at Gaffa gallery. In 2014 Nicholson was an artist in residence at Firstdraft gallery resulting in her second solo exhibition. She recently participated in the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art studio program in Beijing with Shen Shaomin. Nicholson is an associated artist of Gaffa gallery Sydney.  As a Colombian born artist, adopted and raised in Australia, Nicholson occupies an ambivalent position between Australian, Amerindian and Latino cultures. Her work is multidisciplinary with a focus on ceramics, video art, sculpture and painting. She works extensively with her family, using performance to comment on social attitudes pertaining to kinship and familial relationships. The tensions of cultural hybridity and dislocation resonate throughout her practice.

Abdullah M.I. Syed is an interdisciplinary artist working between Karachi and Sydney. His works utilize a variety of mediums and techniques to present a complex political commentary that tackles controversial topics such as the War on Terror, immigration and Western attitudes towards Eastern society. He participated in the Britto artists’ workshop and an artist residency at Cicada Press. He has also co-curated exhibitions, notably Michael Esson: A Survey of Drawing, Michael Kempson: A Survey of Prints, Aboriginal Dreams and Let’s Draw the Line in Karachi, Pakistan. As a designer, Syed co-coordinated the Design Department at the University of Karachi and has lectured there and at UCO in the United States. He is recently completed his Ph. D at the College of Fine Arts in Sydney, Australia.

 

SEA PEARL WHITE CLOUD 海珠白雲, OBSERVATION SOCIETY, GUANGZHOU

GUANGZHOU. 2 JUNE – 24 JULY 2016.
GALLERY 4A SYDNEY. 30 JULY – 24 SEPTEMBER 2016.

Sea Pearl White Cloud is a project realised through a collaboration between 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, located in the heart of Sydney’s Chinatown, and Guanzghou’s Observation Society, one of China’s most exciting contemporary art project spaces. Bringing together Sydney-based artist Lucas Ihlein and Guangdong-born, Hong Kong-based artist Trevor Yeung, Sea Pearl White Cloud presents new works informed by questions of temporality, exchange and poetics that reflect on the urban condition in the twenty-first century.

This is a two-stage exhibition project with the first presented at Observation Society in Guangzhou from 2 June – 24 July 2016, and second iteration that will extend the themes and collaboration to premier in Sydney at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art from 30 July – 24 September 2016.

Following fieldwork within the distinctive spatial and social setting of the residential community in which Observation Society is situated in Guangzhou’s district of Haizhu, as well as further afield throughout the Pearl River Delta, this project has arisen from conversations and research undertaken by the artists over six months. Ihlein and Yeung’s conceptual approaches are informed by quasi-scientific methodologies of tracking and testing various dynamic systems of movement and stasis, control and disorder. Their aims as artists have little to do with producing knowledge in the traditional sense, but rather serve to propose poetic visual and gestural allegories that seek to illuminate everyday occurrences of material and spiritual transformations.

Trevor Yeung’s works are particularly concerned with manipulations of nature – as in his use of UV lighting, dehumidifying units and aquariums – to poetically propose connections between nature, the material world and their emotional import. Complementing this, Lucas Ihlein has extended his ongoing interest in Sydney’s more hidden and neglected natural waterways to that of Guanzghou. In his studied commitment to the idea of ‘drifting’ through landscapes, Ihlein’s psycho-geographies reveal often contradictory and chance encounters between human and natural imperatives at play in a delta that is also one of the most densely urbanised regions in the world. This artistic collaboration across themes and context is signaled by the project’s title: 海珠 (Haizhu) or ‘Sea Pearl,’ signaling a process of materiality – and even beauty – being forged through time; and 白雲 (Baiyun) or ‘White Cloud’, suggestive of interminable transience, while in a more practical sense being the name of the district in which Guangzhou’s international airport is located and where Trevor Yeung has sourced live fish and water for his works.

This project is supported by the City of Sydney with Observation Society’s exhibition opening being part of the official program of the City of Sydney and Guangzhou Municipality’s civic celebrations marking the 30th anniversary of their sister-city relationship. Having artistic collaboration at its heart – between individuals, organisations and cities – this exhibition builds on the links between cities while forging new modes of dialogue that reflect on our shared local, regional and global experiences.

Complementing the two-stage exhibition project 4A, with the support of the City of Sydney and Art Monthly Australasia, is pleased to announce Minerva Inwald as the recipient of the inaugural 4A Emerging Writer’s Project. Selected by a panel comprising Michael Fitzgerald, Editor, Art Monthly Australasia; Luise Guest, Director of Education & Research, White Rabbit Collection; and Pedro de Almeida, 4A Program Manager and Editor of The 4A Papers, Minerva will be an integral part of the project team, travelling to Guangzhou to undertake fieldwork as Observation Society’s exhibition unfolds, and later the exhibition in Sydney at 4A. Her research, including conversations with the artists, will see the publication of two critical texts that document the development, realisation and reception of the exhibitions, along with interviews with the artists and ongoing online content.

 

 

 

Artists:

Lucas Ihlein (b. 1975, Sydney, Australia) is a Wollongong-based artist whose current work explores the relationship between socially engaged art, agriculture and ecological management. He is a founding member of artists’ collectives SquatSpace, Big Fag Press, and Teaching and Learning Cinema.Exhibitions include The Yeomans Project (with Ian Milliss), Art Gallery of New South Wales (2013-14); Green Bans Art Walk, The Cross Arts Projects & Big Fag Press, Sydney (2011); In the Balance: Art for a Changing World, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2010); There Goes the Neighbourhood, Performance Space, Sydney (2009); The Bon Scott Project, Fremantle Arts Centre, Perth (2008); and Bilateral, Australian Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide (2002). He completed a PhD at Deakin University, Melbourne, in 2008 entitled Framing Everyday Experience: Blogging as Art, which won the Alfred Deakin Medal for best Doctoral Thesis in Humanities and Social Sciences. A recipient of numerous awards and artist residencies, in 2015 Ihlein was awarded a prestigious Australia Council for the Arts Fellowship for Emerging and Experimental Arts. He is currently an ARC DECRA Research Fellow at University of Wollongong, Australia.

http://guangzhou-delta-haiku.net

Trevor Yeung (b. 1988, Guangdong Province, China) lives and works in Hong Kong. He graduated from the Academy of Visual Arts at Hong Kong Baptist University in 2010. Yeung’s practice uses botanic ecology, horticulture, photography and installations as metaphors that reference the emancipation of everyday aspirations toward human relationships. Solo exhibitions include No Pressure, Zürcher Hochschule der Künste, Zürich (2015); Garden Cruising: It’s Not That Easy Being Green, Blindspot Gallery, Art Basel Hong Kong (2015); That Dog at the Party, Gallery EXIT, Hong Kong (2014); and Trevor Yeung’s Encyclopedia, Observation Society, Guangzhou (2013). Group exhibitions include Adrift, OCT Contemporary Art Terminal, Shenzhen (2016); Peep Show, Long March Space, Beijing (2015); A Hundred Years of Sham – Songs of Resistance and Scenarios for Chinese Nations, Para Site, Hong Kong (2015); and Social Factory, 10th Shanghai Biennale, Power Station of Art, Shanghai (2014).

Writer:

Minerva Inwald is a current PhD candidate in the Department of History, University of Sydney, whose research focuses on the history of the National Art Museum of China (NAMOC) between 1958 and 1989. Using Chinese-language primary sources to examine how exhibitions as this prestigious space were used to communicate ideas about the role of art in China in relation to conceptions of ‘the people,’ her research seeks to investigate broader questions of how art objects circulate in museum contexts, as well as outside museums such as in domestic, work and public spheres. Minerva graduated with Bachelor of Arts (Languages) Honours degree from the University of Sydney in 2012, and in the same year was awarded the Francis Stuart Prize for Asian Art History form the Department of Art History. She has contributed a number of papers at academic conferences in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, and recently undertook an 8-month postgraduate exchange program at Beijing’s Central Academy of Fine Arts.

《海珠白雲》由兩家藝術機構合作策劃:位於悉尼唐人街中心的4A亞洲當代藝術中心,以及位於廣州的觀察社,中國最前沿的當代藝術空間之一。《海珠白雲》將展出駐悉尼藝術家Lucas Ihlein及駐香港藝術家楊沛鏗的新作,探討人情事物的暫時性、思想和情感交流的可能性及從當下城市生活產生的詩學等問題。這是4A與觀察社合作項目的首站,將在2016年六月2日至七月24日之間在廣州觀察社展出,項目的第二站將在2016年七月30日至九月24日在悉尼4A亞洲當代藝術中心展出。

為製作這次展覽,兩位藝術家進行了超過半年的對話及研究,他們從觀察社所處的廣州海珠區出發,深入考察了其周圍富有特色的居民社區,並將之放在珠三角地區的語境下解讀。Ihlein與楊沛鏗的創作都涉及一種類似科學研究的方法,卻都並非為了生產傳統意義上的新知識,而是為了以詩意的類比去發現在日常生活中事物與精神轉化的可能性。

兩位藝術家中,楊沛鏗的創作特別關注自然元素的運用,例如他會使用UV燈、抽濕機及水族器材,他的目的是以詩意的方式去提出自然、物質世界及其情感意義之間的聯系;而Lucas Ihlein則將他在悉尼的一個長期項目延續到廣州,他考察了城市中比較隱秘和不為人注意的河道 - 順著風景「漂流」,這是他致力於探討的藝術概念,他的心理地理學研究試圖反映在三角洲這種人口密集的地區,人與自然環境之間相互矛盾、不期而遇的關係。展覽的題目指向了這個藝術合作計劃的要旨:「海珠 」,即觀察社所處之區域的名稱,同時暗示了一種物質轉化之時間性及美;而「白雲」則是廣州另一區域的名稱,廣州機場的所在地,但它也意味着一種無法全然把握的變化,而且它也是楊沛鏗作品中一種觀賞魚的名字。

本項目獲悉尼市政府的支持,而本展覽的開幕也是悉尼市與廣州市成為姐妹城市三十周年的慶祝活動之一。《海珠白雲》旨在通過個人、機構及城市之間的藝術協作,建立城市之間的聯系,發現新形式的對話,思考我們共有的本土、地區及全球經驗。

作為這個兩站合作展覽項目的延伸,4A得到了悉尼市政府及《Art Monthly Australasia》的支持,推出4A新銳藝術寫作獎,並宣佈首名獲獎助者為Minerva Inwald。本屆獎項的評審包括《Art Monthly Australasia》編輯Michael Fitzgerald、White Rabbit Collection教育及研究部主管Luise Guest及4A項目總監及《The 4A Papers》的編輯Pedro de Almeida。得獎者Minerva 將加入這次展覽項目的工作團隊,並赴廣州以考察廣州展覽的發生,及後亦會跟蹤悉尼站展覽的過程。根據考察、與藝術家的對話及研究,她將會寫成兩篇評論文章,以討論兩個展覽的構成、實踐及效果,期間亦會在網上發表相關的訪談及筆記。

 

展覽開幕:

2016年六月1日(星期

5.00pm-8.00pm

 

展覽地址:

觀察社

中國廣州市海珠區穗花新村一巷八號102房

空間開放時間:周五、六及日(3pm-7pm,或請預約)

 

展期:            

2016年六月2日至七月24日

關於藝術家:

Lucas Ihlein(1975年生於澳洲悉尼)現居卧龍崗市,他的創作涉及社會參與性藝術、農業及自然環境管理。他是藝術家小組SquatSpace、Big Fag Press及Teaching and Learning Cinema的創辦成員。他的展覽項目包括:《The Yeomans Project》(與Ian Milliss合作,新南威爾士美術館,2013-14年)、《Green Bans Art Walk》(The Cross Arts Projects & Big Fag Press,悉尼,2011年)、《In the Balance: Art for a Changing World》(悉尼當代藝術館,2010年)、《There Goes the Neighbourhood》(悉尼Performance Space,2009年)、《The Bon Scott Project》(柏斯Fremantle Arts Centre,2008年)及《Bilateral》(Australian Experimental Art Foundation,阿德來德,2002年)。在2008年,他在墨爾本迪肯大學獲得了博士學位,他的論文「框起日常經驗:博客作為藝術」獲得了Alfred Deakin 最佳人文及社科類博士論文獎;在2015年,他又獲得了澳洲藝術獎助局頒發的新銳實驗藝術獎。他現在是澳洲卧龍崗大學的ARC DECRA研究員。

楊沛鏗(1988年生於廣東省東莞市)現居香港,他於2010年畢業於香港浸會大學視覺藝術學院。楊採用植物生態,園藝,攝影和裝置來隱喻對人與人之間的關係而得到舒懷。個展包括《冇壓力》(蘇黎世藝術大學,蘇黎世,瑞士,2015年);《遊園:不太容易做綠色》(香港巴塞爾藝術展,刺點畫廊,香港,2015年)及《楊沛鏗的百科全書》(觀察社,廣州,中國,2013年)。聯展包括《他/她從海上來》(OCAT, 深圳,中國,2016年);《窺視秀》(長征空間,北京,中國,2015年);《土尾世界 - 抵抗的轉喻和中華國家想像》(Para Site藝術空間,香港,2015年)以及《社會工廠,第十屆上海雙年展》(上海當代藝術博物館,上海,中國,2014年)。

關於得獎寫作者:

Minerva Inwald 現於悉尼大學歷史系攻讀博士學位,她的研究針對1958年至1989年之間北京中國美術館的歷史,探討歷史上在中國美術館這個尊貴地點舉行的展覽如果表達出藝術在中國的地位及藝術與「人民大眾」的關係,她研究的核心問題是在美術館語境中與在私人、工作及公共語境中藝術作品的流通。Minerva在2012年獲悉尼大學文學士學位,同年獲得悉尼大學藝術史學系的Francis Stuart 亞洲藝術史學獎。她曾在悉尼、墨爾本及布里斯本的學術會議上發表論文,現正在北京中央美術學院參加為期八個月的研究生交流計劃。

 

 

 

MONYET GILA: EPISODE ONE

SYDNEY. MARCH 11 – APRIL 23 2016

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art presents the first iteration of an ongoing exhibition project by Adri Valery Wens and Shaun Gladwell, curated by Natalie King and Mikala Tai.

Monyet Gila: Episode One – The Episode with the Crazy Monkey investigates the role that narrative plays in contemporary culture. The artists consider their projects as separate works, installed in parallel to allow for moments of intersection as each excavates and reappraises epic narratives.

Indonesian, Sydney-based artist, Adri Valery Wens focuses on cultural stories of Hindu-Javanese origin, specifically the Wayang Orang (Human Puppet) performance based on two foundation epics – the Mahabharata (the story of the great Bharata Dynasty) and the Ramayana (the story of Rama’s Journey).

Wens delves into the complexity and tensions of his cultural background through a series of photographic depictions of himself ‘performing’ characters within these epic narratives. Staged in Jakarta, dressed in elaborate costumes and theatrical makeup, the images translate the philosophical, political, poetic, performance and re-performance content of the epic stories through the genre of self-portraiture.

Australian-born, London-based artist Shaun Gladwell’s video artwork explores the popular Japanese television drama Monkey, based on the Chinese novel Journey to the West by Wu Cheng’en. Considered a cult classic, the program incorporated Taoist and Buddhist Philosophy, which had a great influence on Gladwell. The artist’s work looks to re-cast the role of Tripitaka – a young Buddhist Monk. The actress who originally played the monk, Masako Natsume, died in 1985 and Gladwell’s project acts as homage to Natsume’s portrayal of the character.

The collaboration of Gladwell and Wens illustrates how traditional epics and long loved narratives remain a determining factor in the creation of the contemporary self.

Shaun Gladwell (b. 1972 Sydney) is an Australian-born, London-based artist. He completed Associate Research at Goldsmiths College, London in 2001 and has since undertaken numerous international residencies and commissions. He has exhibited prodigiously in Europe, North and South America, and in the Asia Pacific Region. In 2011, Gladwell had major survey exhibitions at the SCHUNCK* museum in Heerlen, The Netherlands and at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Connecticut, USA as part of the Matrix Exhibition Series. His exhibition, Shaun Gladwell: Stereo Sequences, at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image in Melbourne was the first in a series of major commissions by the institution. He also held a solo exhibition, Riding with Death: Redux at Anna Schwartz Gallery, Sydney. His work featured in significant group exhibitions, including: The Power of Doubt, curated by Hou Hanru, Museo Colecciones ICO, Madrid, 2011; Paradise Lost, Istanbul Museum of Art, 2011; Southern Panoramas, 17th International Contemporary Art Festival SESC_Videobrasil, Sao Paolo, Brazil, 2011; and the John Kaldor Family Collection, Art Gallery of New South Wales, 2011. Shaun Gladwell represented Australia at the 53rd Venice Biennale and travelled to Afghanistan as the official Australian War Artist in 2009. A two-part project was exhibited across two sites with Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation featuring a major new commission The Lacrima Chair and UNSW Galleries presenting Collection+: Shaun Gladwell in 2015. He exhibited in the group exhibition Face to Face at the Perth International Art Festival 2016. His work is held in significant public and private collections nationally and internationally, including: Wadsworth Atheneum, USA; Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; the Progressive Art Collection, USA; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney.

Adri Valery Wens (b. 1974 Jakarta) is an Indonesian, Sydney-based artist. Wens completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Art and Design UNSW (previously COFA) in 2012. His first solo show was at MOP Projects in 2012, titled Cinta Mati (Crazy Love). He was shortlisted in several Australian Art Prizes, including the Josephine Ulrich and Win Schubert Photography Award 2015 (acquired), Fisher’s Ghost Art Award 2014, Redlands Konica Minolta Art Prize 2013 (highly commended), Josephine Ulrich and Win Schubert Photography Award 2012, Fisher’s Ghost Art Prize 2009.

FIRST LONGLI INTERNATIONAL NEW MEDIA ARTS FESTIVAL

LONGLI ANCIENT TOWN. 1-5 OCTOBER 2016.

Artists: Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, Owen Leong, Kynan Tan

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art presented the works of three Australian artists as part of the inaugural Longli International New Media Arts Festival in Longli Ancient Town, China, in early October 2016.

 Three Sydney-based artists of Chinese heritage were selected for participation by 4A: Chun Yin Rainbow Chan, Sydney-based singer, producer and performance artist whose works investigate translation, diaspora and the fluid relationship between original and copy; Owen Leong, a contemporary artist exploring the transmission of culture and the body as a physical site of exchange; and Kynan Tan, a Perth-born, Sydney-based artist interested in networks, relationality and digital systems of control.

Accompanied to the Festival by 4A Program Manager Pedro de Almeida, the three artists responded to the Festival’s theme “Metabolism” with a series of media works, installed within an ancient temple.

Longli International New Media Arts Festival is supported by the China Culture Industrial Investment Fund, and focuses focused on the integration of regional culture with the folk culture of Longli, to make artistic works strike a chord with the Ancient City of Longli in various new ways.

Longli International New Media Arts Festival rans from 1 – 5 October, 2016.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

CHUN YIN RAINBOW CHAN

Chun Yin Rainbow Chan is a multidisciplinary artist who works across sound, performance and installation. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Sydney, she is interested in duality, diaspora and the effects of globalisation on modern Chinese society. Chan often evokes traditional Chinese methods or styles and represents them in uncanny ways. Her research engages with the authentic and the copy, exploring sites of exchange and desire which complicate Western notions of originality and “appropriate” consumption.

Central to Chan’s work is the circulation of knock-off objects, sounds and images in global media. Her work positions the fake as a complex sign that shapes new myths, values and contemporary commodity production. Sustained by a parasitic relationship to the original, the counterfeit interacts with the world in unpredictable ways. Chan investigates how these mimetic symbols, such as bootlegs or fake luxury goods, problematise the socially-regulated impulse of consumerist desire.

Tying together her works across installation and pop music is the relationship between nostalgia, migration and identity. Since winning FBi Radio’s Northern Lights Competition in 2011, Chan has been building a reputation as one of the most innovative artists in Australia with her highly personal, experimental pop music. She recently released her debut album Spacings (Silo Arts & Records) which was met with critical acclaim, handpicked as the feature album on FBi Radio, Radio Adelaide, RTRFM and scoring 4 stars from Rolling Stone.

 

OWEN LEONG
Owen Leong is a contemporary artist exploring the transmission of culture and the body as a physical site of exchange. His work transforms the body through fictional selves to open a space for new identities to come into being. In recent work, Leong engages more deeply with his heritage; turning towards Chinese medicine, philosophy, and ancient systems of cultural knowledge to explore the poetics of healing.

Leong has exhibited widely in Australia and internationally including solo exhibitions at Artereal Gallery, Sydney; Dianne Tanzer Gallery + Projects, Melbourne; and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney. His work has been exhibited in major group exhibitions at Singapore Art Museum; Today Art Museum, Beijing; Zendai Museum of Modern Art, Shanghai; OCT Contemporary Art Terminal, Shenzhen; and the National Museum of Poznan, Poland.

In 2015, he received the prestigious Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Photography Award, one of the most important annual surveys of contemporary Australian photographic practice.

Leong is the recipient of numerous awards and grants from the Australia Council for the Arts, Ian Potter Cultural Trust, Art Gallery of NSW and Asialink. He has held residencies at Artspace, Sydney; Centre for Contemporary Chinese Art, Manchester; Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris; Tokyo Wonder Site, Japan; Swatch Art Peace Hotel, Shanghai; and is currently in-residence at Parramatta Artist Studios, Sydney. Leong’s work is held in the public collections of Bendigo Art Gallery, Gold Coast City Gallery, Murray Art Museum Albury, and private collections in Australia and internationally.

Leong holds a Master of Fine Arts by research at College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales, where he studied printmaking, sculpture, performance and installation, and was the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Award.

 

KYNAN TAN

Kynan Tan is an artist interested in networks, relationality and digital systems of control, exploring these areas through artworks that are themselves multi-sensory relational structures. These works engage with digital aesthetics, code and data, taking form as multi-screen audiovisual performances and installations, 3D-printed sculptures, sound, and kinetic artworks of electronic circuits, speakers and lights.

Kynan has been the recipient of a DCA Young People and the Arts Fellowship (2013), Australia Council Artstart grant (2013), and participated in the JUMP Mentorship Program (2012), studying with audiovisual artist Robin Fox. Kynan has performed in Japan, Germany, New Zealand and throughout Australia, including events such as Test Tone (Tokyo), Channels Video Art Festival (Melbourne) and the NOW now Festival of Art (Sydney). His installation works have also been exhibited at MOCA (Taipei, Taiwan), NH7 Festival (Pune, India), First Draft (Sydney), Fremantle Arts Centre (Perth) and the Perth Institute of Contemporary Art. Kynan is currently a PhD candidate at UNSW Art & Design.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

ABOUT LONGLI MEDIA ARTS FESTIVAL 

The Longli Media Arts Festival is to be situated in Longli Ancient town, listed as one of the ecological museums in Guizhou for the cooperation between China and the Kingdom of Norway due to its profound ecological cultural deposits. The town has enchanted artists from all over the world.

As a result, the China Culture Industrial Investment Fund will offer critical support to the Longli International New Media Arts Festival in terms of partnership promotions, investment and financing, talent training, technical support and expert consulting. The Fund will also encourage the organizers to apply for China’s special funds for cultural industry development this year.

 

 

CHEN QIULIN: ONE HUNDRED NAMES

SYDNEY. 16 JANUARY – 27 FEBRUARY 2016.

One Hundred Names is the first Australian solo exhibition by Chinese artist Chen Qiulin. Chen belongs to a generation of Chinese artists whose work articulates the social repercussions of China’s ongoing process of political and economic reform. Her work explores the many contradictions inherent within the conditions that frame contemporary life in a country where myriad tensions and conflicts between tradition, progress and appearances are constantly tested. Raised in Wanzhou City, located in the municipality of Chongqing in western China, Chen’s home city was partially submerged by the construction of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River since 2001 and her work responds to this lived experience of natural and urban landscapes in flux.

4A’s exhibition includes a survey of the artist’s practice from the last ten years. Included are key works such as The Garden (2007) and Farewell Poem (2007), which through performance explore and document the physical and psychological upheaval caused by the comprehensive expansion of the city and the construction of the dam, which forced more than one million people from their ancestral homes. Also exhibited are new works such as City Manager (2015), a single-channel video which focuses on three archetypal figures and their role in the urban expansion and development of a new kind of architecture and class system within China. Playful and irreverent, City Manager speaks to immense influence of a small group of people in shaping the physical and social landscapes of contemporary China.

Commissioned especially for 4A is One Hundred Names for Kwong Wah Chong (2015), the latest iteration of Chen Qiulin’s ongoing One Hundred Surnames in Tofu(2004 – ) project that presents the one hundred most common Chinese family names carved from tofu, slowly decaying over a period of weeks or months. For Chen, tofu is not only one of China’s oldest and most commonly used ingredients but also an apt artistic medium that symbolises the material transformation through intensive labour. One Hundred Names for Kwong Wah Chong has been produced to commemorate Sydney’s iconic Haymarket district and, in particular, Sydney’s first Chinese-owned and operated shopfront business, Kwong Wah Chong, whose location at 84 Dixon Street which was an economic and social cornerstone for the Chinese community in the early decades of the twentieth-century.

As one of China’s foremost artists, Chen Qiulin represents a new voice in contemporary Chinese art which is at once highly personal and universal, speaking to broader politics of migration and identification. One Hundred Names presents a dynamic platform across an exhibition, performance and public programs that showcases the conceptually and technically diverse practice of Chen Qiulin that articulates past experiences and future potentials of social and urban landscapes of our region.

《陈秋林:百家姓》是中国艺术家陈秋林在澳大利亚的首次个展。作为中国年轻一代的优秀艺术家,其作品关注中国不断推进的政治和经济改革所带来的社会影响,把现代生活不断挑战传统价值体系所产生的种种矛盾与现状进行归纳、视觉化。艺术家自幼生活的重庆市万州城在2001年始修建的长江三峡水电工程建设中被大部分淹没,这样的成长经历使其创作紧密围绕自然与都市环境巨变带来的种种不确定性。

4A当代艺术中心此次展览将呈现部分艺术家十年来的艺术探索成果。主要作品包括系列摄影 作品《花园》(2007)、《别赋》(2007 摄影)等,该作品纪录了三峡工程导致的百万居民背井离乡的现实和疯狂扩张的城市给生活带来的魔幻和迷惘,通过行为表演的艺术手段表现了这一过程造成的生活和心理的双重影响。单屏幕录像作品《城市管理者》(2015)以三类真实人群为原型,表现了他们在城市建设及扩张过程中扮演的角色,探讨了中国社会中正在形成的新型等级关系。该作品荒诞滑稽的镜头折射出中国当代生活中个别人群可能带来的巨大而深远的社会影响。

陈秋林为此次在悉尼举办的展览专门创作了新作《广和昌的豆腐百家姓》(2015),其创作构思延续了2004年起不断实践积累的《豆腐百家姓》系列作品。豆腐是中国古老而又常用的食材,艺术家借用其象征意义,通过大量亲身实践将这一素材转化为绝佳的艺术表现媒介。此次新作着眼于悉尼城市地标性地区禧市,突出了悉尼第一家华人店铺“广和昌公司”的经济及社会意义,旨在纪念二十世纪初期第一批华人移民群体所作的巨大社会贡献。

陈秋林代表了一批为中国当代艺术发声发力的优秀艺术家,《陈秋林:百家姓》集展览、行为表演和公众项目于一体,展现了艺术家敏锐而广泛的思考和灵活运用多种媒介的艺术实践,既传达了艺术家作为个体的独特思考,又关照了移民集体身份的社会政治环境,兼顾探讨了悉尼的华人移民的过往与未来。


Chen Qiulin (b. 1975, Yichang, Hubei Province) belongs to a generation of younger artists whose work articulates the social repercussions of China’s ever-constant push for political and economic reform. Visualising the many contradictions inherent to the condition of contemporary living in a country where the tension and conflict between tradition, custom and ritual are consistently challenged, Chen Qiulin’s carefully considered photographic and video compositions are powerful provocations of progress and ambition.

Chen Qiulin has participated in numerous exhibitions in China and abroad, recently featured in 7th Gwangju Biennale, Gwangju, Korea, 2008; ‘Displacement: The Three Gorges Dam and Contemporary Chinese Art’, David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, USA, 2008; ‘China Power Station II’, Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Olso, Norway, 2007; ‘THIS IS NOT FOR YOU – Sculptural Discourses’, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna, Austria, 2006-2007; and ‘The Wall: Reshaping Contemporary Chinese Art’, Millenium Art Museum, Beijing, China and Albright-Knox Art Gallery, New York, USA (touring), 2005 and a number of influential solo exhibitions in Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Max Protetch Gallery, Long March Space, Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum.

Her works have been collected by many important art galleries, collections and private collectors in the United States and Europe, for example Astrup Fearnley Museum (Norway), Denver Art Museum (USA), Logan Collection (USA), T-BA21, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (Austria), Hammer Museum (USA), the Bohen Foundation (New York, USA), Worcester Art Museum (USA), Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art (Australia), Today Art Museum (Beijing, China).

陈秋林( 1975年生于湖北省宜昌市)作为中国年轻一代艺术家,其作品关注中国不断推进的政治和经济改革带来的社会影响。陈秋林运用摄影和摄像手段进行创作,将现代生活与传统价值观的冲突矛盾以视觉形象表现出来。

陈秋林从小生长在重庆市万州城,然而这里的大部分地区在建设三峡大坝扬子江河段时淹没。于2001年启建的三峡工程规模浩大,致使百万的居民背井离乡,陈秋林著名的作品《迁移》便着眼于这项大工程带来的生理、心理双重影响。她不断探索三峡移民无处安放的生活与情感,以及从故乡记忆中产生的文化认同感。陈秋林的创作始终处于探索推进的状态,广泛应用视频,行为表演,摄影,装置等创作媒介,始终保持其独特的社会敏感性,对社会改革进程的勃勃野心提出了有力质疑,并为热点议题引入了崭新的观点及视角。

陈秋林作品参与的国内国外展览众多,近期展出包括:2008年在韩国举办的第七届光州双年展(7th Gwangju Biennale, Gwangju);同年在美国芝加哥大学David and Alfred Smart 美术馆展出的《位移-三峡大坝与中国当代艺术》(Displacement: The Three Gorges Dam and Contemporary Chinese Art);2007年于挪威奥斯陆Astrup Fearnley现代艺术博物馆展出的《中国电站II》(China Power Station II);2006-2007年奥地利维也纳Thyssen-Bornemisza当代艺术馆呈现的《这不是给你的-雕塑语境》(THIS IS NOT FOR YOU – Sculptural Discourses);2005年于北京中华世纪坛美术馆和纽约诺克斯美术馆巡回展出的《墙-重构中国当代艺术》(The Wall: Reshaping Contemporary Chinese Art)。其个展在世界各地多家艺术机构亮相,其中包括洛杉矶翰墨博物馆、纽约Max Protetch画廊、北京长征空间、Eli and Edythe Broad艺术博物馆等。

陈秋林的作品被美国、欧洲等多地画廊、机构及个人收藏,例如Astrup Fearnley博物馆(挪威)、Denver艺术博物馆(美国)、Logan收藏(美国)、Thyssen-Bornemisza当代艺术馆T-BA21收藏(奥地利)、翰墨博物馆(洛杉矶)、Bohan基金会(纽约)、Worcester艺术博物馆(美国)、昆士兰现代艺术馆(澳大利亚)、今日美术馆(北京,中国)等。

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