4A DIGITAL HITS THE STREETS

BRISBANE, SYDNEY, MELBOURNE

23 NOVEMBER – 17 DECEMBER 2020

4A Digital Hits the Streets: Joanna Frank and Spectator Jonze
23 November – 17 December 2020
Various street locations in Brisbane, Melbourne, and Sydney

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is thrilled to announce 4A Digital Hits the Streets, an ephemeral exhibition that will transform digital artworks into interactive street posters across Brisbane, Melbourne, and Sydney this summer. Programmed as part of 4A’s online commissioning platform, 4A Digital, this project features the mesmerising works of Joanna Frank and Spectator Jonze, and are accompanied by a custom-made augmented reality animation created especially by the artists for 4A.

Simply point your phone towards the QR code on the poster, download the Eyejack app (if you don’t have it already), and hover your screen to activate Joanna Frank and Spectator Jonze’s works.

Spot a poster? Let us know on Instagram via @4a_aus and #4ADigital for your chance to win 4A summer prize packs, including limited-edition artist prints, a 4A tote bag, and publications.⠀

4A Digital Hits the Streets takes place in these locations and others:⠀

📍Sydney: 23 Nov – 17 Dec
Alexandria, CBD, Darlinghurst, Leichhardt, Marrickville, Mascot, Newtown, Paddington, Surry Hills and more.⠀

📍Melbourne: 23 Nov – 14 Dec
CBD, Southbank, Carlton North, Collingwood, Fitzroy, Footscray, Richmond, Box Hill, Thornbury, Preston, Prahran and more.⠀

📍Brisbane: 27 Nov – 11 Dec
Airport, Fortitude Valley, Griffith Uni, Indooroopilly, Kangaroo Point, Kelvin Grove, Mt Gravatt, Paddington, Woolloongabba and more.⠀

To celebrate 4A Digital Hits the Streets4A curators Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi invited Joanna Frank and Spectator Jonze to create new works that capture their vivid, character-driven aesthetics, with anthemic themes that celebrate the resilient and dynamic nature that comes with being a woman artist.

For the heroine-driven work, DEADALIVE, Taiwanese-Australian artist-musician Jonze tackles the taboo of coronavirus and maintaining creative stamina during times of unrest. Jonze explains: “For the poster, I wanted to capture the feelings of suffocation, isolation, health technologies and anxiety, but I also wanted to show that out of the rubble, I found the fighter, the survivor and also the amazing fortunes that 2020 has brought me as well.” 

Frank’s pulsating work, Face is the Index of the Mind, pays ode to the lived experiences of creative women of colour: “Having resilience as a migrant is parallel to being an artist: we have this ability to use limited resources and materials to our advantage, and I think this is pretty astonishing when it comes to making art,” says Frank.  “I created the work as a reminder of the value and power that women hold in this world.”

Around 300 posters will be prominently displayed in partnership with leading poster distributor Plakkit, and with support from the City of Sydney. To elevate the experience, these images are integrated with an augmented reality component custom-created by Frank and Jonze. Enter the artists’ conceptual worlds by downloading the Eyejack app on their smartphone, pointing their screen towards the posters, and activating their AR animation in real-time. 

Gerakaris says: “4A Digital Hits the Streets allows 4A to highlight contemporary artists in a guerilla-style exhibition. Alongside the augmented reality videos the project is a unique hybrid of street art, design and digital art showcasing the bold and psychedelic work of Frank and Jonze. Frank’s work, Face is the index of the mind, is a self-assertion of power and confidence, twisting science fiction aesthetics into a visage of a female-driven future.”

Adds Takeuchi: “Spectator Jonze is an evocative multidisciplinary artist whose practice spans across digital media, drawing, performance and sound. Having experienced the COVID-19 virus first hand, DEADALIVE speaks directly to Jonze’s strength as a fighter, artist and survivor in the face of adversity. It’s with great pleasure that we present her work alongside Joanna Frank’s as a part of our initiative.”

The posters are distributed at various sites via our partnership with leading poster distributor Plakkit, and with support from the City of Sydney.

Stay tuned for updates via Instagram from 23 November onwards.

Access Artist Information here.

Download the Media Release here.


About the artists:

Joanna Frank

jf

Artist bio

Joanna Frank is a Sydney based artist/designer born in Chennai, India. Her collages are a series of visual experiments that are created in a dynamic moment. They combine a variety of collected imagery such as personal photos, logos, religious icons, video screen shots and magazine ads. Through both intention and chance these images are layered, distorted and assembled to create new narratives. Frank has exhibited at Goodspace Gallery (Sydney) and Down/Under Space (Sydney). Her work has been published in Apostrophe Magazine, and The Lifted Brow and appeared on album covers and posters for Gauci, DMA’s, Triple One and more. Her commercial clients have included EMI, Pseushi and Universal Music. Joanna Frank is also a musician, and in October, she released her latest EP, FRANK-X  𝒲𝒾𝓁𝒹 𝐿𝑜𝓋𝑒!

Artist statement

“My new work, Face is the index of the mind, is a reflection of my experiences as a creative woman of colour. I believe that pursuing a career in the creative field is just as important as working in medicine or technology, so I want to leave a cultural mark on society through my art. As a migrant, I also feel like I owe it to myself to offer society a different perspective than seeing things from a centralised lens. Maybe this comes from the fact that children of immigrants have this pressure to succeed? Having resilience as a migrant is parallel to being an artist: we have this ability to use limited resources and materials to our advantage, and I think this is pretty astonishing when it comes to making art. If I could do something with so little, imagine what I can do with so much! 

Spectator Jonze

spectator-jonze_courtesy-the-artist

Artist bio

Spectator Jonze is the artist moniker of Deena Lynch. Lynch was born in Yokohama, Japan to a Taiwanese mother and an Australian father. She migrated to Australia under less than certain circumstances when she was 6 years old. For Lynch, art became a medium she utilised as a cathartic vessel to uncover the secrets she had even hidden from herself. ‘Spectator Jonze’ is the culmination of self-discovery and healing that has evolved into a project of passion – bringing mental health to light by depicting the often taboo subject of our individual battles into a colourful, comedic display of imperfectly perfect beauty. Lynch’s other projects include her work as Jaguar Jonze, where her enigmatic yet vulnerable songwriting has seen her music recognised in NME. To celebrate the release of Jaguar Jonze’s latest single, DEADALIVE, she is currently touring across Australia in November and December.

Artist statement

This year was chaos for all of us, for the creative industries (especially in music), and for my health fighting COVID-19. I’m both a visual artist and musician so naturally, for this project, I wanted to draw on what this year meant for me. DEADALIVE was a track I released in September under my music project Jaguar Jonze, it was written in a pressure-cooker environment of uncertainty and tension. I wrote it in our New York apartment earlier this year when we were stuck in the beginning of the pandemic lockdown during our US tour, and then finished it off in Sydney while under hospital care for 40 days recovering from COVID-19. I’ve been in three quarantines this year, finally making it home after 6 months. It was a period of time that tested my resilience and fortitude. For the poster, I wanted to capture the feelings of suffocation, isolation, health technologies and anxiety, but I also wanted to show that out of the rubble, I found the fighter, the survivor and also the amazing fortunes that 2020 has brought me as well.” 


Image captions:

  1. 4A Digital Hits the Streets – Poster image (cropped): Spectator Jonze, DEADALIVE (detail), 2020, courtesy the artist; Joanna Frank, Face is the Index of the Mind (detail), 2020
  2. Joanna Frank, self-portrait (cropped); courtesy the artist.
  3. Spectator Jonze, self-portrait; courtesy the artist.
  4. Joanna Frank, Face is the Index of the Mind, 2020, courtesy the artist.
  5. Spectator Jonze, DEADALIVE, 2020, courtesy the artist.

Dean Cross: Monuments

SYDNEY

13 AUG – 1 OCT 2020

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

181-187 Hay St, Haymarket, Sydney, NSW

Monuments is a site-responsive work by artist Dean Cross– an ongoing project since 2016, intended for exhibition every two years. Handfuls of white ochre – consisting Ngunnawal/Ngambri Country where the artist grew up, and gathered with permission from local elder and custodian of the land Aunty Matilda House – build a grid that spreads across the gallery floors.  A number of the ‘monuments’ are interspersed with gold leaf. With each handful representing one year of colonisation in Australia, Cross’ Monuments to strength, survival and custodianship challenge colonial concepts of ceramics, memorialisation and memory. Says Cross: “A Western statue is a depiction; my monuments are the real thing”[1].

Monuments is exhibiting at 4A in 2020 as a precursor and grounding work to 2021 4A exhibition Drawn by stones. Drawn by stones brings together artists who utilise the ceramic medium to interrogate contested histories, stolen land, Indigenous sovereignty, and concepts of national identity. In 2021, exhibiting artists from Australia, Hong Kong and Taiwan will further investigate the creation of a sense of ‘nationhood’ through ceramics, demonstrating how the medium can both memorialise and tell alternative histories.

 Dean Cross was born and raised on Ngunnawal/Ngambri Country and is of Worimi descent. He is a trans-disciplinary artist primarily working across installation, sculpture and photography. His career began in contemporary dance, performing and choreographing nationally and internationally for over a decade with Australia’s leading dance companies. Following that Cross re-trained as a visual artist, attaining his Bachelor’s degree from Sydney College of the Arts, and his First Class Honours from the ANU School of Art and Design.

Cross has shown his work extensively across Australia. This includes the exhibiting of Monuments as part of the 2018 Indigenous Ceramic Prize at the Shepparton Art Museum, curated by Anna Briers and Belinda Briggs; Tarnanthi at the Art Gallery of South Australia, curated by Nici Cumpston (2017); RUNS DEEP a solo show at Alaska Projects, Sydney (2018); The Churchie Emerging Art Prize (2016); The Redlands Konica Minolta Art Prize (2015); and the Macquarie Group Emerging Art Prize (2015) where his work was awarded the Highly Commended prize by artist Joan Ross. In 2020, Cross has staged solo exhibitions I LOVE YOU. I’M SORRY at Firstdraft Gallery, and A Sullen Perfume at Yavuz Gallery. Cross has also exhibited at Outerspace, Brisbane; Alaska Projects; the Australian Centre for Photography, Sydney, as a part of the NEXTWAVE Festival Melbourne, with curator Amelia Winata; and at Artbank, Sydney in Talia Smith’s In a World of Wounds. Dean was also selected to be a part of the 4A Beijing Studio Residency Program in Beijing, China in 2018. Dean’s work has been collected extensively and is held in significant public and private collections including the National Gallery of Victoria, The Art Gallery of South Australia, The Queensland University of Technology Art Museum, and the Canberra Museum and Gallery. He is represented by Yavuz Gallery, Sydney and Singapore.

[1] Cross, Dean, quoted in “Of Salt and Ochre: Contemporary Clay and Kinship with Country”, Briers, A and Briggs, B, The Journal of Australian Ceramics, July 2018.

 



Watch a short artist talk with Dean Cross, where he reflects on this monumental work at 4A, and the stories and legacies that inform his trans-disciplinary practice. Filmed at 4A on 15 September 2020, this video features an introduction by 4A Deputy Director Bridie Moran, who curated Dean Cross: Monuments as a precursor to the 2021 Drawn by stones exhibition.

Download the transcript here.


Exhibition Documentation:

All Images:

Dean Cross, Monuments (2018 – ongoing indefinitely, 2020 iteration), handfuls of Ngunnawal ochre & gold leaf, dimensions variable; photos: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian art; courtesy the artist.

Handfuls of white ochre and gold leaf squares laid in a grid layout on a hardwood floor in a naturally lit gallery room with white walls

Piles of white ochre on a hardwood gallery floor

Close-up of white ochre granules on a square of gold leaf

Holding Patterns

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

9 JUL – 29 OCT 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. These exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien Situ, Crossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

Referring to the aeronautical manoeuvre of an airplane forced to delay its landing procedure to avoid potential disaster, a holding pattern suggests divergence from an established routine and the suspension of normalcy. Crucially, it is an action of adaptability: a pilot executing specific turns whilst accounting for wind speed and direction to establish its course. The pattern achieves seemingly limitless flight, looping until given permission to commence its landing operations, once again returning to earth and reality. It is in this moment of suspension that we find ourselves undertaking our own rituals of contemplation, addressing our own pathways forward in a time of stillness.

For the exhibiting artists COVID-19 has been an unexpected intervention, a force majeure. Forced out of their routines, artists have now been given opportunities to reflect on what it means to be creatively-engaged during a time of crisis. Contemplating artistic practice with the arts industry shut down, Holding Patterns demonstrates the resilience and ingenuity of artists during this time.. Some have taken time to rest and recharge, quietly laying projects to rest to make way for new ideas, while others have pivoted to hone their craft. 

Through textiles, sculptures, metallurgy, drawing and painting, the artists of Holding Patterns deftly navigate cultural histories, identities, object permanence and transmutation through process-based practice. As the first exhibiting artist, Kien Situ creates architecturally-informed sculptures of domestic and sacred objects and furniture rendered with obscurity in form, function and material. The complex ‘interknot’ technique of Crossing Threads® embraces compositional tension and release in the contrasting tones and textures of their lyrical, abstracted pieces. Shireen Taweel modernises the traditional art of copper-smithing to create pieces that blur the line between jewellery and sculpture, opening dialogues of shared histories and relationships between communities of fluid identities. Sofiyah Ruqayah’s indeterminate forms draw upon mutations of human and non-human realities, generating connections between tangible bodies and aetheric dreams and spirit worlds informed by cultural myths of embodiment.

Fusing together their own creative impulses within traditional methods, these artists make mass departures from ‘normal’ culturally-concerned art making. It is within these strays from tradition and the ‘expected’ that new cultural dialogues can begin to emerge, representing the hybridity of Asian-Australian contemporary art practice. By merging traditional Asian techniques and labour-intensive processes, Holding Patterns relishes in craftsmanship and provides opportunities to glimpse the artists’ material worlds of contemplation and stillness, offering momentary suspension from our own holding patterns.


Artist Biographies:

Kien Situ (b. 1990, Sydney) is a sculpture and installation artist meditating on memory, cultural amnesia and identity in relation to the aesthetics of constructed objects and environments. Drawing upon familiar spatial, formal, textural, tectonic and material experience of his East Asian upbringing, Kien utilises and dissects his Eurocentric architectural education to create objects which reinterpret formative aesthetic and sensory experiences obfuscated by a diasporic childhood. His works are a physical melding of this experience, casting industrial gypsum cement with the regional, “artistic” material of Chinese Mò ink, a material central to the artist’s practice as part of the investigation into the symbiotic relationship between geography, place and identity.

Crossing Threads® is the collaborative work of Australian-born sisters of Filipino heritage Lauren Hernandez (b. 1988, Sydney) and Kass Hernandez (b. 1989, Sydney). These self-taught tapestry artists first explored the practice of weaving in early 2015 by attending a beginner’s workshop. Known for their large-scale and highly textural handwoven pieces, the Hernandez sisters seek to emulate the natural forms found in nature. Their carefully curated fibre selections include Australian Merino wool, plant-based fibres, up-cycled/dead-stock fabrics and other foraged items that aren’t traditionally used in fibre art. Their practice has led them to develop their recognisable ‘interknot’ technique, made up of intertwining hand-knotted chains of varying texture and thickness which graduate to a relief. The artists continually draw spiritual inspiration from their surrounding landscapes and personal experiences and are materialised through their abstract designs.

Shireen Taweel (b. 1990, Bankstown, lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is a multimedia installation artist whose work broaches issues of the construction of cultural heritage, knowledge and identity through language and the constantly shifting public space of the social, political and religious axiom. Her artistic practice draws from the personal experiences of being Lebanese Australian living between cultures, and how the physical spaces within her community reflect a complex cultural landscape of transformation expressed through hybridity and plurality. The project development of Shireen’s works are often site-specific, weaving local narratives and research with a focus on experimentation in material and sound through site. Shireen’s constant acquisition of traditional coppersmith artisan skills is a research vessel for community focused conceptual development, and through a progressive application of the collected artisan techniques and a manipulation of the traditional acts of making that leads to possibilities of cross-cultural discourse opening dialogues of shared histories and fluid community identities. 

Sofiyah Ruqayah (b. 1992, Sydney) is a Sydney-based artist working across drawing, installation, collage and painting to explore the strange territories between human and nonhuman realities. She is interested in themes of mutation, dream and spirit worlds. Drawing upon imagined and felt connections between various bodies, presences and memories, as well familial and cultural myths of embodiment, Sofiyah’s practice invites us to speculate on our nonhuman origins and intertwined fates. In 2020, Sofiyah is undertaking a 12-month studio residency at Parramatta Artists’ Studios, and will present her first solo exhibition at 4A in October, as part of the Holding Patterns exhibition series. She has exhibited both locally and internationally, including group exhibitions at Lubov Gallery (New York), Peacock Gallery (Sydney) and at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (Sydney) with Woven Kolektif, a collective of emerging Australian artists with personal ties to Indonesia.

 


Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

6 – 30 AUGUST 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. Curated by Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi, these exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien SituCrossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

View the Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads roomsheet here.

View the Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads wall labels here.


To coincide with the exhibition, 4A presented an Instagram Live talk on 16 August with artists and sisters Lauren Hernandez and Kass Hernandez, who work under the collaborative name Crossing Threads. Holding Patterns curator Con Gerakaris spoke with the duo about the socio-cultural, environmental and familial stories that inform their practice, as well as the interesting materials and methods that make up the multi-textural works on display at 4A. This live-streamed talk was recorded in our Haymarket gallery and is part of our 4A TALKS series.

Watch the Instagram Live talk HERE.

Listen to the talk below.


Crossing Threads® is the collaborative work of Australian-born sisters of Filipino heritage Lauren Hernandez (b. 1988, Sydney) and Kass Hernandez (b. 1989, Sydney). These self-taught tapestry artists first explored the practice of weaving in early 2015 by attending a beginner’s workshop. Known for their large-scale and highly textural handwoven pieces, the Hernandez sisters seek to emulate the natural forms found in nature. Their carefully curated fibre selections include Australian Merino wool, plant-based fibres, up-cycled/dead-stock fabrics and other foraged items that aren’t traditionally used in fibre art. Their practice has led them to develop their recognisable ‘interknot’ technique, made up of intertwining hand-knotted chains of varying texture and thickness which graduate to a relief. The artists continually draw spiritual inspiration from their surrounding landscapes and personal experiences and are materialised through their abstract designs.


Exhibition Documentation: 

All images: Kai Wasikowski

Blue and white textile hanging, suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel in a white gallery space
Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®: (Back Right): THE DIVIDE, 2020, alpaca, bamboo, canvas, cotton, cotton roping, felted Merino wool, hand cut denim, hand cut leather, hand dyed raffia, hand dyed Shibori, hemp, linen, marine roping, Merino wool, mixed natural fibres, Pima cotton; suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel; handwoven by Kass HernandezLeft Wall Right: Crossing Threads, Consolation, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, handspun upcycled yarn, hemp, leather, linen and mixed natural fibres framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Kass Hernandez,  courtesy the artists.

Close-up image of detailed weaving of blue and white roping and fibres

Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®: (Back Right): THE DIVIDE (detail), 2020, alpaca, bamboo, canvas, cotton, cotton roping, felted Merino wool, hand cut denim, hand cut leather, hand dyed raffia, hand dyed Shibori, hemp, linen, marine roping, Merino wool, mixed natural fibres, Pima cotton; suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel; handwoven by Kass Hernandez, courtesy the artists. 

Close up image of detailed weaving of blue and white roping and threads

Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®: (Back Right): THE DIVIDE (detail), 2020, alpaca, bamboo, canvas, cotton, cotton roping, felted Merino wool, hand cut denim, hand cut leather, hand dyed raffia, hand dyed Shibori, hemp, linen, marine roping, Merino wool, mixed natural fibres, Pima cotton; suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel; handwoven by Kass Hernandezcourtesy the artists. 

A glass panelled wall looking into a gallery space with textile hangings

Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020, courtesy of the artists. 

Close-up image of different fibres in shades of brown woven together

Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®, UNDER MY SKIN (detail view), 2020, Bamboo, chenille, Egyptian cotton, hemp, Japanese silk, jute, leather, linen, merino wool, mulberry tussah, raffia and wire on galvanised steel frame Handwoven by Lauren and Kass Hernandez, photo: Kai Wasikowski, image courtesy of the artists. 

A Filipina woman in an orange dresswith long brown hair looks at a circular textile hanging

Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®, UNDER MY SKIN, 2020, Bamboo, chenille, Egyptian cotton, hemp, Japanese silk, jute, leather, linen, merino wool, mulberry tussah, raffia and wire on galvanised steel frame Handwoven by Lauren and Kass Hernandez, courtesy of the artists.

A woman in a teal-blue jacket and orange dress looks at a large textile hanging of blue and white fibres

Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. Crossing Threads®: (Back Right): THE DIVIDE, 2020, alpaca, bamboo, canvas, cotton, cotton roping, felted Merino wool, hand cut denim, hand cut leather, hand dyed raffia, hand dyed Shibori, hemp, linen, marine roping, Merino wool, mixed natural fibres, Pima cotton; suspended off a painted Tasmanian oak wooden dowel; handwoven by Kass HernandezLeft Wall Right: Crossing Threads, Consolation, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, handspun upcycled yarn, hemp, leather, linen and mixed natural fibres framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Kass Hernandez,  courtesy the artists. 

A Filipina woman in a grey checked dress looks at a woven panel of coloured fibres

Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®; Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020, Kass Hernandez of Crossing Threads® with the following works: (Left) Crossing Threads®, Seek, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, hemp, Japanese silk and paper, linen, mixed natural fibres and sari silk framed in Tasmanian oa. Handwoven by Lauren Hernandez. (Right) Crossing Threads®, Consolation, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, handspun upcycled yarn, hemp, leather, linen and mixed natural fibres framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Kass Hernandez.

A woman in a teal-blue jacket and orange dress walks past six panels of different woven fibres

Image: Crossing Threads®; Holding Patterns: Crossing Threads®Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, August 2020. From Left: Crossing Threads®, Seek, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, hemp, Japanese silk and paper, linen, mixed natural fibres and sari silk framed in Tasmanian oa. Handwoven by Lauren Hernandez. Centre: Crossing Threads®, Consolation, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, handspun upcycled yarn, hemp, leather, linen and mixed natural fibres framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Kass Hernandez. Right: Crossing Threads®, Inward State, 2020, bamboo, cotton, hand dyed Merino wool, hemp, Japanese silk and paper, linen, mixed natural fibres and sari silk framed in Tasmanian oak. Handwoven by Lauren Hernandez, courtesy the artists. 

Return to Holding Patterns exhibition page

Holding Patterns: Kien Situ

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

9 JULY – 2 AUG 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. Curated by Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi, these exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien SituCrossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

View the Holding Patterns: Kien Situ roomsheet here.

View the Holding Patterns: Kien Situ wall labels here.

Listen to Kien Situ in conversation with John Choi (Founding Partner, CHROFI) here:

Kien Situ (b. 1990, Sydney) is a sculpture and installation artist meditating on memory, cultural amnesia and identity in relation to the aesthetics of constructed objects and environments. Drawing upon familiar spatial, formal, textural, tectonic and material experience of his East Asian upbringing, Kien utilises and dissects his Eurocentric architectural education to create objects which reinterpret formative aesthetic and sensory experiences obfuscated by a diasporic childhood. His works are a physical melding of this experience, casting industrial gypsum cement with the regional, “artistic” material of Chinese Mò ink, a material central to the artist’s practice as part of the investigation into the symbiotic relationship between geography, place and identity.


Exhibition Documentation:

All images: Kai Wasikowski

Square of black plaster hung on a white gallery wall

Kien Situ, Shanshui (Wall Plate), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 48 x 48 x 8cm. Courtesy the artist.

Three squares of black plaster hung on a white gallery wall

Kien Situ, Shanshui (Wall Plate), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 48 x 48 x 8cm. Courtesy the artist.

A stele of black plaster with a misshapen hole gaping in its middle, looking through the a gallery glass wall

Kien Situ, Shanshui (Stele), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 128 x 64 x 32cm. Courtesy the artist.

A woman looks at a long rectangular panel of black plaster on a gallery wall, surrounded by a stele and two squares of black plaster

Holding Patterns Part One: Kien Situ (installation view) Left: Kien Situ, Shanshui (Wall Plate), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 48 x 48 x 8cm. Centre: Kien Situ, Shanshui (Scroll), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 88 x 64 x 8cm. Right: Kien Situ, Shanshui (Column), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 136 x 24 x 24cm. Courtesy the artist.

A woman crouches down to look into a crevice in a black plaster stele

Holding Patterns Part One: Kien Situ (installation view) Front, Kien Situ, Shanshui (Column), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 136 x 24 x 24cm. Back left: Kien Situ, Shanshui (Scroll), 2020, Chinese Mò ink, gypsum plaster, 88 x 64 x 8cm. Courtesy the artist.

The front glass window looking into an art gallery, with the sign '4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art' suspended above

Holding Patterns Part One: Kien Situ (installation view). Courtesy the artist.

Return to Holding Patterns exhibition page

Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

3 – 25 SEPTEMBER 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. Curated by Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi, these exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien SituCrossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

View the Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel roomsheet here.

View the Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel wall labels here.

Watch or download a transcript of 4A TALKS // Shireen Taweel & Reina Takeuchi here.


Shireen Taweel (b. 1990, Bankstown, lives and works in Sydney, Australia) is a multimedia installation artist whose work broaches issues of the construction of cultural heritage, knowledge and identity through language and the constantly shifting public space of the social, political and religious axiom. Her artistic practice draws from the personal experiences of being Lebanese Australian living between cultures, and how the physical spaces within her community reflect a complex cultural landscape of transformation, expressed through hybridity and plurality. The project development of Shireen’s works are often site-specific, weaving local narratives and research with a focus on experimentation in material and sound through site. Shireen’s constant acquisition of traditional coppersmith artisan skills is a research vessel for community-focused conceptual development, and through a progressive application of the collected artisan techniques and a manipulation of the traditional acts of making that leads to possibilities of cross-cultural discourse, opening dialogues of shared histories and fluid community identities.


Exhibition Documentation: 

All images: Kai Wasikowski

A gallery glass front with the sign '4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art' suspended above

Holding Patterns Part 3: Shireen Taweel (Installation view), photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

Two large pierced copper bands suspended from a gallery ceiling

Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’, 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

Close-up of detail on a large pierced copper band

Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’ (detail), 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

Close-up of a pierced copper band

Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’ (detail), 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

A Japanese-Australian woman in a white jumpsuit looks at a large suspended pierced copper band in an art gallery

Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’, 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

Two suspended pierced copper bands lit by gallery lights

Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’ (detail), 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

A Japanese-Australian woman in a white jumpsuit with curly brown hair looks at a suspended pierced copper band

Shireen Taweel, Holding Patterns: Shireen Taweel, Installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, September 2020. 
Shireen Taweel, ‘tracing transcendence’, 2018, pierced copper, band 1: 30 x 180 x 180cm; band 2: 30 x 210 x 210cm; photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, courtesy the artist.

Return to Holding Patterns exhibition page

Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

1 – 29 OCTOBER 2020

In a period of uncertainty and stasis, artists have demonstrated the capacity of human creativity through artistic innovation, lateral thought, and inspired action. In our current period of changes and shifts, 4A is pleased to invite you to engage with Holding Patterns, a series of four solo exhibitions on view from July to October. Curated by Con Gerakaris and Reina Takeuchi, these exhibitions highlight and support the works of Sydney-based artists Kien SituCrossing Threads®, Shireen Taweel and Sofiyah Ruqayah, utilising our ground-floor gallery space and windows out onto Haymarket’s streets.

View the Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah roomsheet here.

View the Holding Patterns:Sofiyah Ruqayah wall labels here.

Watch or download a transcript of 4A TALKS // Sofiyah Ruqayah & Reina Takeuchi here.


To coincide with the exhibition, 4A presented an artist talk with Sofiyah Ruqayah in conversation with 4A Assistant Curator Reina Takeuchi. The interview explores how inspiration, rest and balance have guided the artist through these unprecedented times. Ruqayah also reflects on her experience of isolation and personal research into animal and marine life, and how these learnings have informed her 4A show.

Listen to the talk below:


Sofiyah Ruqayah (b. 1992, Sydney) is a Sydney-based artist working across drawing, installation, collage and painting to explore the strange territories between human and nonhuman realities. She is interested in themes of mutation, dream and spirit worlds. Drawing upon imagined and felt connections between various bodies, presences and memories, as well as familial and cultural myths of embodiment, Sofiyah’s practice invites us to speculate on our nonhuman origins and intertwined fates. In 2020, Sofiyah is undertaking a 12-month studio residency at Parramatta Artists’ Studios and will present her first solo exhibition at 4A in October, as part of the Holding Patterns exhibition series. She has exhibited both locally and internationally, including group exhibitions at Lubov Gallery (New York), Peacock Gallery (Sydney) and at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre (Sydney) with Woven Kolektif, a collective of emerging Australian artists with personal ties to Indonesia.


Exhibition Documentation: 

All images: Kai Wasikowski

A Vietnamese woman in a grey jumper and jeans crouches down to look into a glass orb on a furry blue sculpture

Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah(installation view), 4A Centre forContemporary Asian Art, Sydney

A woman in a grey jumper and jeans looks at blue distorted words that spell 'I suspect I should be disappointed' on a white gallery wall

Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah (installation view), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney.
Floor: Sofiyah Ruqayah, Harbingers of Doom(detail), digital collage print on satin, faux fur, plywood, storm glass, dimensions variable, courtesy the artist.
Wall: Sofiyah Ruqayah, Self-fulfilling prophecies, 2020, digital collage print on paper, pins, 124.9 x42cm, courtesy the artist. 

Close-up of a tear drop-shaped storm glass filled with a watery solution

Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney.
Sofiyah Ruqayah, Harbingers of Doom (detail), digital collage print on satin, faux fur, plywood, storm glass, dimensions variable.

 

The words 'I suspect I shall be disappointed' digitally collaged from blue eel skin and pinned on a white gallery wall

Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney.
Sofiyah Ruqayah, Self-fulfilling prophecies
, 2020, digital collage print on paper, pins, 124.9 x 42cm.
Three elongated floor sculptures made from blue faux fur embedded with tear drop-shaped storm glasses
Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah (installation view), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney.
Floor: Sofiyah Ruqayah, Harbingers of Doom(detail), digital collage print on satin, faux fur, plywood, storm glass, dimensions variable, courtesy the artist.
Wall: Sofiyah Ruqayah, Self-fulfilling prophecies, 2020, digital collage print on paper, pins, 124.9 x42cm, courtesy the artist. 

A woman with black hair looks into a reflective storm glass on a blue faux fur floor sculpture

Holding Patterns: Sofiyah Ruqayah (installation view), 4A Centre forContemporary Asian Art, Sydney.
Floor: Sofiyah Ruqayah, Harbingers of Doom(detail), digital collage print on satin, faux fur, plywood, storm glass, dimensions variable, courtesy the artist.
Wall: Sofiyah Ruqayah, Self-fulfilling prophecies, 2020, digital collage print on paper, pins, 124.9 x42cm, courtesy the artist. 

 

Return to Holding Patterns exhibition page

On the Move: The Dion Family

WOLLONGONG ART GALLERY, WOLLONGONG. 1 DECEMBER 2019 – 23 FEBURARY 2020.

Artists: Matt Chun, Pia Johnson and Naomi Segal.

Venue: Wollongong Art Gallery, 46 Burelli Street, Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Delving through more than a century of the Dion family, an indelible part of the Illawarra’s social fabric as members of the Chinese diaspora and operators of the region’s bus services, On the Move tells a story of migration, survival, acceptance and community spirit of a remarkable family through archival material and responses from contemporary artists.

The Dion family, whose name evolved from Chong Da On to Chong Di On then Di On before eventually settling with Dion, arrived in Australia in the late 1800s as part of a larger migration driven by the prospects of alluvial goldmining. The family eventually arrived in the Illawarra in 1907, where they quickly established themselves as prominent members of the community, playing an important role in creating the multicultural social fabric of the Illawarra that we know today. They did this by building on a successful market garden family business before forming a bus service in 1923, which imparted a great community sentiment over the decades through their committed service and hospitality. The company was established by Tom Dion who commandeered a 1923 Model T Ford fitted with timber seating to accommodate twenty passengers. The family, over several generations, are widely admired by the residents of the Illawarra, with a particular fondness for the memory that during the Great Depression the Dions routinely allowed locals to ride their buses free of charge if they could not pay fares due to mass unemployment and economic hardship. The Dion’s Bus Service continues to operate a fleet of buses in Wollongong and surrounds today.

The Dion family story represents a fascinating example of the important contributions Chinese-Australians have made to Australia and, indeed, the nation’s perception of itself as an inclusive and culturally diverse society. This exhibition at Wollongong Art Gallery presents a selection of curated objects drawn from the family’s vast archive of material, along with the presentation of new commissions by contemporary Australian artists that distil this historical archive and history.

Artist Biographies

Matt Chun (Lives and works Bermagui, Australia) is a studio artist, independent writer and children’s author, working from his seaside studio in Bermagui, a small town on Yuin country in regional NSW. He also divides his time between Melbourne and Taipei. Matt lives, works and travels with his 8-year-old son, making portrait, landscape and travelogue studies across a range of media. He has undertaken tenures as artist-in-residence in Australian at Casula Powerhouse, Nishi Gallery and New Acton Precinct, and in Taiwan at both Bamboo Curtain Studio and Guandu International Art Festival. His first Taiwanese solo exhibition was held at Pon Ding Space, Taipei, in September 2019. As a writer, Matt is primarily interested in Australian national identity and the visual culture of colonisation, combining first-person narrative reportage with field research into the semiotics of public space. His essays have appeared in Overland Literary Journal, Meanjin Quarterly and Runway Experimental Art. Matt’s second picture book for Australian publisher Little Hare is due for release in October. His first, Australian Birds, released in 2018, has been listed as a Children’s Book Council of Australia Notable Book and is currently shortlisted for the CBCA Award for Best New Illustrator. He is currently working on a graphic novel for young children.

Pia Johnson (b. 1983, Melbourne, Australia lives and works in Woodend, Australia) Pia Johnson is a photographer and visual artist, whose practice seeks to investigate issues about cultural difference, diaspora and identity. She also has a strong practice in portrait and performance photography, working with major and independent arts organisations in Australia. Pia has exhibited throughout Australia, the USA, China, Japan and Mexico. She has been a finalist in many photography awards, and is regularly invited as a guest speaker and artistic advisor for a range of organisations. Her work is collected in private and public collections including the National Gallery of Victoria. Recent highlights include solo exhibitions Cusp (2019) at Stockroom, She that came before me (2018) at Manningham Art Gallery, being a finalist in the Ravenswood Australian Women’s Art Prize (2019), group exhibition All That We Can’t See (2018), her curatorial exhibitions The Family Mantle (2018) and Chinese Whispers and Other Stories (2017), and an artistic residency at National University of Singapore (2018).

Naomi Segal  (b.1998, Sydney) Naomi Segal’s practice draws from her experience of loving and being loved. Inspired by the generosity of her Shanghainese family, her art-making often meditates on food, gifts and physical affection as expressions of love that can traverse linguistic and cultural barriers. More recently, Segal has created comics, drawings and letters as transmissions of love to her Toronto-based partner. Her work occurs through experiments with modes of display and tactile mark-making processes. She is also an avid maker of zines.

Segal has exhibited at Artereal Gallery, Newcastle Art Gallery, Kudos Gallery, Down Under Space, Brunswick Street Gallery and others. Her awards include the Girl Genius Award (2018) and Little Things Art Prize (2017), and is an inaugural studio resident with the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Her emergent curatorial practice began at Firstdraft in 2019 with Peach Blossom Spring.

 

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Wansolwara: One Salt Water

SYDNEY

4A HAYMARKET

UNSW GALLERIES

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art will close our offices and galleries from Wednesday 18 to ensure the health and wellbeing of our staff, creatives, audiences and wider community. The original closing date for this exhibition has been brought forward. View the documentation of this exhibition below. 

Wansolwara: One Salt Water is a series of exhibitions, performances and events from across the Pacific and throughout the Great Ocean. Wansolwara – a pidgin word from the Solomon Islands meaning ‘one-salt-water’ or ‘one ocean, one people’ – reflects not a single ocean, but rather a connected waterscape that holds distinct and diverse cultures and communities. Through art, performance and conversation, the project celebrates the depth and diversity of contemporary visual and material culture throughout these regions, placing customary practices alongside contemporary articulations in art, writing and the moving image.

Unfolding across multiple sites over the summer of 2020, Wansolwara: One Salt Water profiles the creativity of the region through multidisciplinary forms. Artists Terry Faleona, Ruha Fifita, Rebecca Ann Hobbs, Shivanjani Lal, Paula Schaafhausen and Vaimaila Urale all present significant bodies of work that trace connections to the Pacific through language, tradition, dance and ceremony. Commissioned by 4A and UNSW Galleries, artist and curator Léuli Eshrāghi presents O le ūa na fua mai Manuʻa a focus within the exhibition that expands the Pacific from a geographical region to consider networks and exchange facilitated by the Great Ocean. The project brings fresh international perspectives to current endeavours to embody and awaken Indigenous sensual and spoken languages through works that focus on language, the body, gender, sex, desire and pleasure. It features works by asinnajaq, Sarah Biscarra Dilley, Sebastián Calfuqueo Aliste, Mariquita Davis, Amrita Hepi, Caroline Monnet, Faye Mullen, Shannon Te Ao, Angela Tiatia and Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu.

4A and UNSW have also commissioned Troppo Galaktika, a Sydney-based collective to curate the third iteration of Club 4A focused on the continuing and contemporary cultures of the Pacific. This evening of food, parades and performances weaves its way from 4A to a karaoke club in Haymarket, animating the streets of Sydney with performances that occur outside the gallery and within the living, pulsating nightlife of the city.

Alongside the exhibition a series of academic modes of enquiry elucidate key themes of the project. Australian based early-career writers Mitiana Arbon, Winnie Dunn, Enoch Mailangi and Talia Smith have been commissioned to participate in the Wansolwara Writers Program. Their critical responses to the exhibition will be shared on FBi Radio, through podcasts and in a special edition of 4A’s biannual online journal the 4A Papers available in May 2020. A day-long symposium at UNSW Art & Design and series of public programs will further illustrate, through research, the depth and diversity of creativity from the region.

Creatives: Sebastián Calfuqueo Aliste, Mitiana Arbon, asinnajaq, Mariquita ‘Micki’ Davis, Sarah Biscarra Dilley, Winnie Dunn, Léuli Eshraghi, Terry Faleono, Ruha Fifita, Troppo Galaktika, Amrita Hepi, Rebecca Ann Hobbs, Shivanjani Lal, Enoch Mailangi, Caroline Monnet, Faye Mullen, Paula Schaafhausen, José Da Silva, Talia Smith, Mikala Tai, Shannon Te Ao, Angela Tiatia, Vaimaila Urale and Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu.

Exhibiting artists at 4A: Terry Faleono, Rebecca Ann Hobbs, Paula Schaafhausen and Vaimaila Urale.

Wansolwara: One Salt Water is exhibited across both 4A (17 Jan – 29 Mar) and UNSW Galleries (17 Jan – 18 April).

Logos for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, UNSW Galleries, Sydney Festival and FBi Radio


As part of Wansolwara: One Salt Water, 4A presented a new installment of the Please Explain talks series. Please Explain: no one’s drowning, baby features artist Paula Schaafhausen, Guardian Australia Pacific Editor Kate Lyons and Professor John Church, pre-eminent expert in sea level rise, speaking to to the issue of climate change in this major Sydney Festival panel event moderated by Wesley Enoch.

Listen to the talk below.


Exhibition Documentation

240 black cards patterned with sand, tiled along two white gallery walls, with a stream of sand and a plastic lily on the floor in front

Back left:  Vaimaila Urale, Manamea ma Anivanuanua, 2020, black card and sand, 240 pieces across two walls, each wall installation measuring 5940x2520mm. Front right:  Terry Faleono, Sand, 2020, sand and plastic flower, dimensions variable. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

240 black cards patterned with sand tiled on two white gallery walls

Vaimaila Urale, Manamea ma Anivanuanua, 2020, black card and sand, 240 pieces across two walls, each wall installation measuring 5940x2520mm. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Close-up of keyboard punctuation symbols shaped in sand on black card

Vaimaila Urale, Manamea ma Anivanuanua, 2020, black card and sand, 240 pieces across two walls, each wall installation measuring 5940x2520mm. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Close-up of a strip of sand patterned with a footprint, with a plastic pink flower lying on the side

Terry Faleono, Sand, 2020, sand and plastic flower, dimensions variable. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Twelve small Polynesian figurines made from coconut oil and ocean debris, standing in a circle on a white platform

Paula Schaafhausen, Ebbing Tagaloa, 2020, coconut oil, found objects from Sydney, dimensions variable. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

A circle of small Polynesian figurines made from coconut oil and ocean debris

Paula Schaafhausen, Ebbing Tagaloa, 2020, coconut oil, found objects from Sydney, dimensions variable. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Close-up of the face of a sculpture modelled after a Polynesian God, made from coconut oil an debris

Paula Schaafhausen, Ebbing Tagaloa, 2020, coconut oil, found objects from Sydney, dimensions variable. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

A circle of small Polynesian figurines made from coconut oil and debris, with a wall mural made from 240 black cards decorated with sand behind

Front:  Paula Schaafhausen, Ebbing Tagaloa, 2020, coconut oil, found objects from Sydney, dimensions variable. Back:  Vaimaila Urale, Manamea ma Anivanuanua, 2020, black card and sand, 240 pieces across two walls, each wall installation measuring 5940x2520mm. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Three gallery windows filter sunlight onto melted coconut oil on a white platform

Paula Schaafhausen, Ebbing Tagaloa, 2020, coconut oil, found objects from Sydney, dimensions variable. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Close-up of some mounds of coconut oil with a bird feather and some leaves and found objects

Paula Schaafhausen, Ebbing Tagaloa, 2020, coconut oil, found objects from Sydney, dimensions variable. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

Image of a screen projected with a video of a woman in a matching crop top and pants dancing outside a closed shop front named 'The Polynesian Clothing Warehouse Co'

Rebecca Ann Hobbs in collaboration with the dancer Amelia Lynch, Ōtara at Night, 2011, 2:00 HD video. Soundtrack: Limb By Limb, by Cutty Ranks, on Reggae Anthology. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.

A video of a dancing woman in a matching crop top and pants projected onto a screen set up in front of metal benches

Rebecca Ann Hobbs in collaboration with the dancer Amelia Lynch, Ōtara at Night, 2011, 2:00 HD video. Soundtrack: Limb By Limb, by Cutty Ranks, on Reggae Anthology. Photo: Kai Wasikowski for 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artist.